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Success! Htet Aung from Burma raised $1,500 to treat a neural tube defect on his face.

Htet Aung
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Htet Aung's treatment was fully funded on June 2, 2016.

Photo of Htet Aung post-operation

July 22, 2016

Htet Aung received successful surgery to treat the defect on his face.

After surgery, Htet Aung’s vision is improving. He can see clearly and can read books much better than before. Now, Htet Aung is able to go back to school and his mother also can go back home and can do house chores. His mother and siblings no longer worry for Htet Aung’s condition.

Htet Aung said, “I am not shy to go out with friends and can go back to school soon.”

His mother shared, “I want all donors and staff that were involved in my son’s treatment to be happy and healthy. I also wish and pray that the donors and hospital can help people more in the future.”

After surgery, Htet Aung's vision is improving. He can see clearly and can read books much better than before. Now, Htet Aung is able to go ...

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May 24, 2016

“I want to be a car driver and see the country when I grow up,” says 12-year-old Htet Aung. He is a third grade student from Burma, and likes to watch television, play sports, sing and play with toys.

When Htet Aung was born at home in his village, his mother noticed a small bump on the bridge of his nose, directly between the eyes. About six months later, doctors diagnosed this bump as an encephalocele. This is a neural tube defect caused by the failure of the neural tube to close completely during fetal development.

The growth of the mass has been slow but steady over the years and affects Htet Aung’s vision. To read, he has to bring the book very close to his face. The mass is generally not painful but occasionally, he will feel sharp pangs. It also causes him tearing.

Besides this encephalocele, Htet Aung has been in relatively good health. However, he is becoming increasingly sensitive about the mass on his face.

Htet Aung’s family tried to find him proper medical services at a larger hospital about ten years ago. However, they realized they could not afford the expensive surgery that he would need to remove the growth. Htet Aung’s father works as a carpenter and his siblings work in a sewing factory– their income is not enough to pay for major surgery in addition to supporting their family.

After learning about Burma Border Projects (BBP) from a neighbor, Htet Aung travelled four hours with his mother to reach BBP for treatment. $1500 will cover the cost of his operation to surgically remove the growth, as well as any additional transportation and hospital costs before and after the procedure.

Although Htet Aung’s family is nervous about possible adverse affects of the surgery on his vision or cognition, they are eager for him to finally receive treatment. After the operation, Htet Aung will be able to return home and lead a normal childhood.

“I want to be a car driver and see the country when I grow up," says 12-year-old Htet Aung. He is a third grade student from Burma, and like...

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Htet Aung's Timeline

  • May 24, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Htet Aung was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • May 30, 2016
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Htet Aung received treatment at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • June 01, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Htet Aung's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 02, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Htet Aung's treatment was fully funded.

  • July 22, 2016
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Htet Aung's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.