Burma Children Medical Fund

5,761 donors have funded healthcare for 1,195 Burma Children Medical Fund patients.

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Burma Border Projects provides access to medical care for people on the Thai/Burma border through its partner, Burma Children Medical Fund.

Medical assistance is inaccessible to many people living in Burma because of the high cost of treatment and lack of free healthcare. There are also an estimated 2 million Burmese people living in Thailand unable to access the Thai healthcare system.

BCMF is one of the few organizations that has a strong enough relationship with the relevant Thai authorities to facilitate the transportation to and treatment of Burmese people at Thai hospitals.

More information is available on the Burma Border Projects and Burma Children Medical Fund websites.

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Shin

Shin is a 15-year-old novice monk from Burma. He lives and studies with his brother in Aung Damar Zinyone Learning Centre Monastery in Insein Township, Yangon Division. His father is a government officer for the ministry of religious affairs and culture and his mother is a shopkeeper and sells rice and curry. Although his parents send them pocket money, they cannot always do so. Instead, Shin and his brother are supported by the monks, and he collects donations of food from the community with the other monks, during morning alms collections. In his free time Shin like to play football with his friends. Sometimes, he likes to read books and study to learn new things. Shin was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Shin has difficulty breathing, is unable to sleep at night and sometimes he has a fever during the night. He cannot walk long distances and he has difficulty walking up stairs. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Shin. The treatment is scheduled to take place on August 21 and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. “When I grow up, I want to become a monk to help those in need as well as children whose parents cannot afford to send them to school,” said Shin. “This has been my dream since I was a child.”

94% funded

94%funded
$1,414raised
$86to go
Chit

Chit is a 30-year-old man who lives with his wife, daughter, son and father-in-law in Noh Poe Village, Myawaddy Township, Karen State, Burma. Chit’s daughter and son go to school. Chit, together with his wife and father-in-law work as farmers on land they rent. Chit’s family does not have regular income, but they sell durian and betel nut that they grow in their garden. Seven years ago, Chit started to experience pain in his lower left abdomen. He also had difficulty passing urine so he went to Myawaddy Hospital for help. He received an ultrasound and an x-ray before the doctor informed him that he has a urinary tract infection (UTI) and a kidney stone. He was treated for the UTI but he did not received treatment for the kidney stone. He was given a follow-up appointment for every month, to receive medication for the abdominal pain. He continued to return for his appointments until late-2018, but when he did not feel better he followed his neighbour’s suggestion and sought help at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Thailand on 20 February 2019. When Chit arrived at MTC, he received an ultrasound as well as a urine and blood test. After the tests, the medic informed him that he has a kidney stone and he was prescribed some medication. On 29 February, MTC referred him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. At MSH, he underwent an intravenous pyelogram (IVP) and was asked to return to MSH for his follow-up appointments and he returned several times. Eventually, he was told that the kidney stone had moved into his urethra and that he would need to undergo laser treatment to break up the stone. Currently, Chit still experiences pain in his lower left abdomen and sometimes he has difficulty passing urine. He worries that his condition will get worse if he does not get treatment. Sometimes his urine has blood in it, especially when he drinks less water and he has difficulty passing urine. Sometimes, he feels like the pain of his abdominal is worse and he is not able to walk or work. He is unable to sleep, and he feels more comfortable when he lies down and rests. In his free time, Chit loves to forage for vegetables in the forest.

86% funded

86%funded
$1,293raised
$207to go
Kyin

Kyin is a 69-year-old retired teacher who lives with her 31-year-old son and 39-year-old daughter-in-law in Yangon, Burma. As a retired teacher since 2010, Kyin receives 140,000 kyat (approx. 140 USD) per month as part of her pension. She now volunteers as a teacher at a monastic school. Both her son and daughter-in-law work for a company. Kyin has another son who was paralysed in a workplace accident. He used to live with Kyin, but when her health deteriorated and she could no longer care for him, he was moved to a social care centre in Yangon. One day, in March 2016, Kyin was teaching at the monastic school, when suddenly she fainted. A medical emergency team then attended to her. When she felt better, a doctor told her that she might have a heart condition and advised her to see a heart specialist. One month after the incident, she went to a cardiologist at North Okkalapa General Hospital. There, she received an X-ray and an echocardiogram (echo). After checking her results, the doctor told her that she has a heart problem and that she can die if she does not receive appropriate treatment. The doctor prescribed her medication for her heart and told her that she will need to receive surgery if her health deteriorates. Six months ago, when Kyin received another echo and the doctor told her that she needs to receive surgery right away. However, her family could not afford to pay for her surgery. Therefore, the doctor said that he would help find them an organization that could help with paying for her surgery and medication. Currently, Kyin is unable to sleep well at night on her back and she needs to sleep propped up. She often feels tired and has shortness of breath.

81% funded

81%funded
$1,221raised
$279to go
Linn

Linn is a 24-year-old seventh grader from Burma. She lives with her parents, grandmother, an uncle and three younger sisters in Myawaddy Township, Karen State. Among her family, only her father and her mother work. Her uncle stays home and looks after her grandmother and her youngest sister, while her two other sisters go to school. To support their family, Linn’s parents work as day labourers. About six months ago, while she was studying at school, Linn started to experience dizziness and severe headaches. When she looked at the blackboard and her notebook, she had blurry double vision. However, she did not say anything to the teacher as she is new at the school and she was afraid of the teacher. When her friends found out what was happening to her, they wanted to tell the teacher, but Linn forbid them from doing so. After a month of struggling with this problem, Linn finally told her mother. She had kept it from her as she knew about their financial difficulties and she did not want to become a burden. Linn's parents took her to an eyeglass shop in Myawaddy. There, they examine her eyesight, told Linn that she does not need eyeglasses and urged her to go to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) in Thailand. Doctors want Linn to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose her condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Linn's CT scan and care, scheduled for September 2nd. As for Linn, she enjoys studying a lot. She said, “English and mathematics are my favorite subjects. I’m also interested in karate as self-defense course and I want to learn it. But, when I have time, I have to help out with household chores. I also have to set aside time to studying.”

50% funded

50%funded
$210raised
$204to go
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