C

Christopher Nichols

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Christopher's Story

Christopher joined Watsi on April 18th, 2014. Six years ago, Christopher became the 160th member to automatically support a new Watsi patient every month. Since then, 5,880 more people have become monthly donors! Christopher's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Yang, a grandmother from Cambodia, for vision-restoring cataract surgery.

Impact

Christopher has funded healthcare for 30 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by Christopher

B. Kuma

B. Kuma, a beautiful and adorable six-month-old girl, lives about 500 kilometers from Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. Her parents are poor farmers and their income is not enough to feed the family well. Thus far, B. Kuma has been fed exclusively on breast milk. B. Kuma was born with an anorectal malformation called imperforate anus, which means she has no opening where the anus usually should be. As a result, she cannot pass stool in a normal way. Due to her condition, B. Kuma developed a bowel obstruction and had to have an emergency colostomy. A colostomy is a surgical procedure in which a piece of the colon is redirected to an alternative opening in the abdominal wall so that waste material can exit the body. However, B. Kuma has had numerous issues with the colostomy, including complications such as leakage and irritation. Her family has suffered throughout this process. They went to a number of hospitals in search of treatment, and they are very worried about their daughter's condition. Children born with birth defects-- and indeed, their parents too-- often fall victim to social stigmas and discrimination. For these reasons, B. Kuma and her parents risk social and psychological problems if she cannot be treated. "I can't pay for my child's medical bill and that worries me for the past six months," says B. Kuma's father. "I did not know what to do. But we heard from another hospital that our child can get the treatment for free at Bethany Kids (a facility run by Watsi's medical partner), and we came here hoping for help." Fortunately, we can help fund B. Kuma's $1,500 procedure, during which doctors will surgically repair her malformation. After her surgery, B. Kuma should be able to pass stool normally, eliminating the risk of future health complications and social barriers.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Htet Aung

“I want to be a car driver and see the country when I grow up," says 12-year-old Htet Aung. He is a third grade student from Burma, and likes to watch television, play sports, sing and play with toys. When Htet Aung was born at home in his village, his mother noticed a small bump on the bridge of his nose, directly between the eyes. About six months later, doctors diagnosed this bump as an encephalocele. This is a neural tube defect caused by the failure of the neural tube to close completely during fetal development. The growth of the mass has been slow but steady over the years and affects Htet Aung's vision. To read, he has to bring the book very close to his face. The mass is generally not painful but occasionally, he will feel sharp pangs. It also causes him tearing. Besides this encephalocele, Htet Aung has been in relatively good health. However, he is becoming increasingly sensitive about the mass on his face. Htet Aung's family tried to find him proper medical services at a larger hospital about ten years ago. However, they realized they could not afford the expensive surgery that he would need to remove the growth. Htet Aung's father works as a carpenter and his siblings work in a sewing factory-- their income is not enough to pay for major surgery in addition to supporting their family. After learning about Burma Border Projects (BBP) from a neighbor, Htet Aung travelled four hours with his mother to reach BBP for treatment. $1500 will cover the cost of his operation to surgically remove the growth, as well as any additional transportation and hospital costs before and after the procedure. Although Htet Aung's family is nervous about possible adverse affects of the surgery on his vision or cognition, they are eager for him to finally receive treatment. After the operation, Htet Aung will be able to return home and lead a normal childhood.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded