Profile 132x132 7eae8fe4 c303 42d3 b761 46eb37ce6109

Grace Garey

MONTHLY DONORCofounder at Watsi

United States   •   watsi.org   •   Born on November 16

Grace's Story

Grace joined Watsi on June 22nd, 2012. Seven years ago, Grace joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Grace's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Son, a rice and vegetable farmer from Cambodia, to fund a myringoplasty.

Teams

Team avatar 48x48 watsi logo new

Watsi

14 members

Team avatar 48x48 chase katie mark gsvc planning

Watsi OGs

6 members

Impact

Grace has funded healthcare for 292 patients in 17 countries.

All patients funded by Grace

Losieku

Losieku is a nine-year-old boy and the youngest child born to his mother, who has six children. He is a friendly, cheerful and hard-working boy. He has not had the chance to go to school yet, though his father says he has plans to enroll him in school next year if everything goes well. Losieku lives in Northern Tanzania. The majority of people in this area are traditional Maasai and are livestock farmers. Losieku's father has a few goats that Losieku and his siblings take out to graze. They also practice small-scale farming of maize and vegetables as a source of food. About three years ago, Losieku was out playing with his siblings. He fell and his left hand went into an open fireplace where a bit of hot charcoal was burning below ashes. He sustained burns which were treated at home using traditional herbal medication due to lack of money and distance to the closest hospital. Over the years, the skin around his fingers has contracted and he is unable to straighten them. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is helping Losieku receive treatment. On March 3, surgeons at AMH's care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery so that he will be able to use his fingers freely. Now, he needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Losieku’s father shared, "it’s really challenging for my son to carry out his daily activities because of his hand. He is a hardworking boy, and if he gets his hand corrected, it will help him do more with ease.”

100% funded

$874raised
Fully funded
Saw Ki

Saw Ki is a 10-year-old boy living with his parents, sister and a brother in Mae Ra Ma Luang Refugee Camp in Thailand. Saw Ki is in grade two and his siblings also attend school in the camp. At school, Saw Ki’s favorite subject is Koraen literature. In the future, he would like to become an agricultural day laborer and work hard like his father. On the morning of January 30, 2021, Saw Ki was playing with his friends when he slipped on some rocks and fell onto his left arm. Right away, his left arm became extremely painful and his left arm looked deformed. Saw Ki was brought to the refugee camp’s hospital run by Malteser International (MI) Thailand. After a medic completed a physical examination, the medic told him that they thought his left forearm was broken. Saw Ki was referred to Mae Sariang Hospital to receive an x-ray. There, the doctor confirmed that his left forearm was broken and referred him to Chiang Mai Hospital for surgery right away. Currently, Saw Ki cannot move his left hand and he is in a lot of pain. He has been receiving pain medication while waiting for surgery. This surgery is costly for Saw Ki and his family. Saw Ki's father used to work as an agricultural day laborer in nearby villages, but he can no longer work since the refugee camp went into lockdown following the outbreak of Covid-19. His mother is a homemaker. Although their household receives a cash card with 2,200 baht (approx. 74 USD) every month to purchase rations, this amount is not enough. Their family struggles to make ends meet without Saw Ki’s father’s income, and they appeal for financial support. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Saw Ki will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for February 2nd and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Saw Ki will no longer be in pain and he will be able to return home, play with his friends and also continue his studies. Saw Ki shared, "I want to play a lot of games with both of my hands, like before. I am not scared of receiving surgery."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Collins

Collins is a young boy from the northeastern slopes of Mt Kenya in Meru County, Kenya. He is 5 years old and is the firstborn in a family of two children. His mother is a housewife, while his father is a mason. Collins was born with clubfoot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. Since birth, he has had serial casting treatment, but his condition has yet to improve. Both his mother and his sibling also have neglected clubfoot conditions. Collins has difficulty with walking and wearing shoes, and is unable to play with other kids. In January 2020, he was able to undergo a left posterior medial release (PMR) with Watsi support, and his foot has corrected well. As a result of the surgery, he is able to wear his left shoe and his walking has improved. However, his right foot is still deformed and requires surgery for him to be able to walk comfortably and confidently on both feet. Fortunately, Collins' family traveled back to our medical partner's care center, AIC Cure International Hospital. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on his right foot on January 11th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,286 to fund Collins's clubfoot repair. This surgery will be very impactful for Collins because he will be able to walk, play, and enjoy life like other children. His mother is grateful for the support for his first surgery, and again appeals for support for this procedure as their income level is not high enough to afford his needed care. Collins' mother shared, “I would like to thank CURE Hospital and AMH-Watsi who made possible my son’s first surgery. May the almighty God bless you. I continue to plead for support for the planned surgery on his right foot so that he can fully walk without any difficulty.”

100% funded

$1,286raised
Fully funded
Haruna

Haruna is a 10-year-old student from Tanzania. Haruna is the fourth born child in a family of five children. He is currently in Class Five, and his best subjects are mathematics and social studies. Haruna is a big lover of football, which his father says he picked at an early age. Unfortunately, a few months ago, his father has had to stop him from playing football due to the level of deformity in his legs and risk of getting a fracture. Haruna was diagnosed with genu varus. His legs bow outwards at the knee so that they do not touch. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has difficulty walking for a distance and he is no longer able to play football, the sport he loves. The procedure Haruna needs is costly for his family. Haruna's parents are small-scale farmers of maize, beans and tobacco. They are able to get their food from the harvest of maize and vegetable and some little money from selling tobacco harvest. Now, they are appealing for financial support for Haruna's cost of care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Haruna. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 3rd. Treatment will hopefully restore Haruna's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Haruna shared, “I would like to be able to walk well and play like my friends. Please help me get this treatment."

100% funded

$880raised
Fully funded
Mo

Mo is a 22-year-old student from Thailand. He lives along with his father in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. While living in the camp, Mo finished high school and is now completing post-high school education. Their household receives 480 baht (approx. $16 USD) each month as part of their food support from an organization called The Border Consortium. However, this amount is not enough to cover their daily needs. Therefore, Mo's father works as a seasonal agricultural day laborer in a nearby village. He is able to earn an extra 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) in a month but this amount is still not enough and they shared that they struggle to make ends meet despite having free basic health care and education in the camp. In early September, Mo started to feel dizzy frequently, especially whenever he stood up. At first, he thought he would feel better after he rested and slept. However, he was unable to sleep well for about a week and was suffering from insomnia. After a medic examined him he was referred to the local hospital for treatment. The doctor at the local hospital referred him to Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) to see a neurologist. After he returned to the camp, Mo rapidly started to lose his vision in both of his eyes. An NGO called Malteser International Thailand (MI) was able to arrange Moses’ travel documents, he was brought to CMH on October 5th, 2020. The next day, he received a CT scan which showed that he has a mass in his brain and a build-up of cerebrospinal fluid in his brain due to the mass. Because of the severity of his condition, the doctor scheduled him to receive surgery right away on October 9th. The mass will be removed and sent for biopsy. He will also undergo a procedure to receive a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt to drain the excess fluid from his brain. Currently, Mo has a headache, and he is not able to move his eyes from side to side. He needs his father to accompany him wherever he goes because he can no longer see far. He spends most of his time lying down in bed and needs to be pushed in a wheelchair to get around due to his new vision problems. Mo sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo a brain mass removal surgery on October 9th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. “Life suddenly become darker without me knowing why," said Mo. "It is extremely difficult for me to even go to the toilet [by myself]. I cry while I lay in bed for many hours. I really miss seeing colors."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded