Grace GareyMONTHLY DONOR
Grace's Story

Grace joined Watsi on June 22nd, 2012. Seven years ago, Grace joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Grace's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Nkwikaize, a 60-year-old woman from Uganda, to fund a hysterectomy so she can keep farming.

Teams
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Watsi

16 members

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Watsi OGs

6 members

Impact

Grace has funded healthcare for 302 patients in 17 countries.

All patients funded by Grace

San is a 41-year-old woman who lives with her husband, daughter, and son in Burma. Her children are students, but the schools are closed due to a COVID-19 outbreak and teachers' strike against the military coup earlier this year. San and her husband rent land and grow sesame and sunflowers. They shared that their income last year from selling their harvest was about 1,500,000 kyat (approx. $1,500 USD) for the year, which is only enough to cover their daily expenses and basic health care. Unfortunately, the rainy season was late this year, and they could not grow any sesame as a result. San's family is worried about the impact this will have on their income and their family. Starting in May, San felt tired and developed a fever, so she visited the local clinic and received medication for her symptoms. While her fever reduced, she still felt tired, and her heartbeat increased. Three days later, her son developed a fever and also went to the local clinic. While there, San was able to share more about her condition with the clinicians. The doctor listened to her heart, gave her an injection and medication, and told her to come back if she continued to feel unwell. That night, San experienced heart palpitations and could not sit or lie down for long periods. On May 29th, she visited the Magway General Hospital, where she received oxygen, an injection, a blood test, and an electrocardiogram (ECG). Doctors also recommended an echocardiogram and a chest x-ray, which she received in follow-up care on May 31st. After reviewing the results of her tests, the doctors shared that San's heart valve does not work well and suggested meeting with a cardiologist for further testing. While the military coup made it challenging to find a cardiologist, San visited her brother's town for treatment. After further testing, a cardiologist diagnosed San with mitral valve stenosis and told her that she needed surgery to replace a damaged heart valve. Currently, San feels tired and suffers from heart palpitations when she walks short distances and cannot lie down for long periods. Fortunately, San was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), to help afford her surgery. On October 3rd, San will receive treatment, and BCMF is requesting $1,500 to help directly fund her procedure. San said, “I would like to get better soon because my family had to try hard to borrow enough money for my treatment. This year, we will not be able to earn a profit from our farm. This year is very difficult for everyone. I would like my daughter and son to finish their studies. I would like to work hard for my family’s future. After I recover from my operation, I want to open a shop in my village to earn more money. I will try to send my daughter and son to school until they graduate. Thank you so much for supporting the cost of my surgery.”

89%funded
$1,340raised
$160to go

Joan is a playful and happy three-year-old girl. She's the third born in a family of four. Their family lives in a rental house in a small town in Kenya. Her father works as a shopkeeper, and her mother is a housewife. Joan's father earns limited wages from the business, especially during the difficult times caused by the COVID pandemic. Having been blessed with four children, Joan's father's income is often not enough to cater to the basic needs of his children and also pay for the health care that Joan needs. Joan was brought to the hospital with recurrent tonsillitis and pain when swallowing for more than a year now. She has difficulty sleeping, and breathing when she sleeps. These symptoms are attributed to enlarged tonsils that are blocking her airways. Her mother also reported that when Joan has an active infection, she is not able to feed well and even has difficulty in breathing during the day. Before they came to Kapsowar Hospital, Joan's mother had been taking her to a health facility for treatment with antibiotics, though they have not been effective. Our surgeons have recommended that Joan’s condition is best treated surgically and have booked her for a tonsillectomy. The surgery will improve her general well-being and bring her peace during the night and aid in proper feeding. Joan's family is requesting any well-wisher to support them so that their daughter can undergo surgery. Joan will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare. Fortunately, she is scheduled to undergo a tonsillectomy on April 23rd. African Mission Healthcare is requesting $420 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will be able to sleep and breathe peacefully throughout the night. Joan's mother shared, “I want my child to get treated so that she can breathe well and sleep well. Thank you for your support.''

$420raised
Fully funded

Losieku is a nine-year-old boy and the youngest child born to his mother, who has six children. He is a friendly, cheerful and hard-working boy. He has not had the chance to go to school yet, though his father says he has plans to enroll him in school next year if everything goes well. Losieku lives in Northern Tanzania. The majority of people in this area are traditional Maasai and are livestock farmers. Losieku's father has a few goats that Losieku and his siblings take out to graze. They also practice small-scale farming of maize and vegetables as a source of food. About three years ago, Losieku was out playing with his siblings. He fell and his left hand went into an open fireplace where a bit of hot charcoal was burning below ashes. He sustained burns which were treated at home using traditional herbal medication due to lack of money and distance to the closest hospital. Over the years, the skin around his fingers has contracted and he is unable to straighten them. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is helping Losieku receive treatment. On March 3, surgeons at AMH's care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery so that he will be able to use his fingers freely. Now, he needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Losieku’s father shared, "it’s really challenging for my son to carry out his daily activities because of his hand. He is a hardworking boy, and if he gets his hand corrected, it will help him do more with ease.”

$874raised
Fully funded