Grace GareyMONTHLY DONOR
Grace's Story

Grace joined Watsi on June 22nd, 2012. Eight years ago, Grace joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Grace's most recent donation traveled 8,300 miles to support Thay, a baby girl from Burma, to fund brain surgery to heal her hydrocephalus.

Teams
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Watsi

16 members

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Watsi OGs

6 members

Impact

Grace has funded healthcare for 314 patients in 17 countries.

All patients funded by Grace

Thay is a one-year-old girl from Burma. She lives with her parents, grandfather, three sisters and a brother in a village. Thay's mother looks after her and her brother at home, her grandfather is retired, and her sisters go to school. Thay's father works as a porter, but has has difficulty finding work for over a month. With the increasing number of internally displaced people settling in their village due to the humanitarian crisis, there are now many individuals competing for the same work. When Thay was around eight months old, her parents noticed that her head was increasing in size. As a result, Thay cannot yet sit up or crawl. She is only able to turn her head, and will cry if she cannot see her parents. Thay was recently diagnosed with hydrocephalus, which has causes fluid to build up in her brain. Without immediate surgery to alleviate the intracranial pressure, Thay is at risk of developing severe, potentially fatal medical complications. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund the insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for Thay, which will drain the fluid that has accumulated in her brain. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 20th and, once completed, will greatly improve Thay's quality of life as she grows up. Thay's father said, "I am thankful to every organisation and everyone for supporting my daughter’s treatment cost. Because of you, I believe that my daughter will receive surgery and be healthy and live a normal life after treatment."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Aurelia nervously looked around the room and tightly clinged to her mother as our local Watsi rep met with her family at the hospital. Aurelia is the only child in her family. Her mother stays at home with her and has no source of income. Her father works as a volunteer cleaner at a local parish. The catholic priest heading the parish gives him $50 for upkeep and food. Aurelia's father lives in a single room provided for by the church, while her mother lives with Aurelia in their ancestral home in Shinyalu, Kenya. Aurelia does not have a medical insurance coverage and relies on support from friends and well-wishers. Aurelia is an 8-month-old baby and has been unable to pass stool normally since her birth. Doctors have diagnosed her with congenital condition and she needs a colostomy surgery to help treat her condition. If left untreated, the condition may cause complications with her spine, anus, heart, trachea, esophagus, kidneys, arms and legs, and digestive and urinary systems. When the beautiful bouncing baby girl was born in February, her parents and doctors realized that she could not pass stool. She was attended to and advised to visit the health facility in Shinyalu after three months. She went to the hospital but they didn’t have a pediatric specialist. They were referred to a bigger facility with pediatric surgery services. Their family went back home since they could not afford it. For several months, Aurelia has been straining to pass stool until a local priest intervened. The parish raised some amount for fare and consultation and they referred them to our medical partner's care center BethanyKids Hospital where similar services are offered. Aurelia's family visited the hospital on November 1st and doctors have recommended urgent surgery. Aurelia's father says, “My baby is jovial and active. But this condition is causing her a lot of strain especially when going to the bathroom. We are hopeful she will recover and be well.”

$1,152raised
Fully funded