Mason's Story

Mason joined Watsi on April 7th, 2014. Eight years ago, Mason joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Mason's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Emmanuel, a bright student from Tanzania, to fund clubfoot repair surgery so he can walk easily.

Impact

Mason has funded healthcare for 84 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Mason

Bo is an eighth grader who lives in the school dormitory during the school year. During his free time, he likes to play the guitar, cook, and garden. He recently had his arm is amputated to help treat his bone cancer condition, so he is no longer able to play guitar anymore. His parents and his siblings live on the Thai-Burma border. His brother and his mother are day labourers while his father is retired. In May 2021, Bo began to experience pain in the top of his left forearm, close to his shoulder. In June 2021, the top of his left forearm began to swell until it spread towards his shoulder. The swelling grew very large, encompassing his left shoulder and upper forearm. Bo was in a lot of pain and could not use his left arm. Doctors diagnosed him with bone cancer and amputated his left arm to help stop his cancer from spreading further. He has also undergone chemo treatment after his amputation and now his doctor wants to do an MRI to assess his prognosis and plan for any further treatment that may be needed to protect his health. An MRI is an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $814 to cover the cost of Bo's MRI and care, scheduled for March 11th. Bo said, "Since I finished my surgery and finished chemo injection, I am able to continue my studies without any pain. I hope that I will be able to continue my studies until I gradate from school."

54%funded
$445raised
$369to go

Nyo is a 58-year-old woman. She and her husband are agricultural day laborers, but Nyo had to stop working two years ago due to poor vision. Since COVID-19 led to lockdowns in April 2020, her husband only receives work from his employer when there is a worker shortage so their income has been very limited. Nyo shared that she likes to meditate with prayer beads and listen to the news about her homeland Myanmar and music on the radio. Nyo is experiencing a cataract in her right eye. She can only see shadows, and the vision in her right eye is worsening. As a result, she cannot do household chores, and her husband has to help her to eat and guide her to the bathroom. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), is helping Nyo receive treatment. On January 4th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Nyo’s natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Nyo’s procedure. Nyo shared, “If I can’t work or I can’t see, I will have to beg to eat because my husband cannot work. My husband and I were so happy to learn that an organization will help pay for the cost of my treatment. We are thankful to the donors and BCMF.” Nyo added, “When I have money, I want to open a small dry foods shop in my house. This way, when my husband and I are no longer able to continue to work as day laborers because of our age, we can chose a way to earn extra money while staying at home.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

John is very talkative and welcoming 46-year-old man. He arrived to the hospital with pain and distention for 3 days before admission to Kijabe Hospital this week. He had an x-ray and an endoscopy on the same day that revealed he has a Sigmoid Volvulus a condition in which the sigmoid colon wraps around itself, causing a closed-loop obstruction. This condition causes continued abdominal discomfort. He's now scheduled for a laparotomy and sigmoid colectomy to rectify the condition and needs financial support. Barely two weeks ago, John was very excited that he had found a job and was looking forward to his first day at work. Two days before he had to report to work, he noticed that he had not passed stool for some days. He started feeling uncomfortable but thought that he will be well soon enough. The day he was waiting for had arrived and he reported to work very happily but uncomfortable because his condition had worsened. He opened up to his immediate supervisor who advised him to go back home and seek medical attention. His supervisor went ahead to offer him some money to cater for the transport fee. John went to the terminus and boarded a matatu to head back home. Along the way, the pain worsened and was unbearable and he started vomiting. He requested the driver to drop him off at a nearby hospital. Luckily, the matatu was almost near our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital. The driver pulled over and helped him catch a taxi to Kijabe as fast as he could. He was admitted as an emergency case under the general surgery team. John is the father of six children, with his firstborn now 20 years old and married. Four of his children are in high school and the youngest is yet to join the school. Eight months ago, John lost his job as a security guard in a flower farm. After he was dismissed, he used the money he was given as service fees to buy a motorcycle, with which he started a bodaboda taxi business. His wife is involved in farming and mostly she sells the farm produce to supplement their family's earnings. John shared, “I feel sad for myself and my family because now I cannot do anything to provide for them as I am in hospital. I would really like to go back to work and earn enough for them.”

$616raised
Fully funded