Sakhi PatelMONTHLY DONOR
Sakhi's Story

Sakhi joined Watsi on September 10th, 2015. Two years ago, Sakhi joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Sakhi's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Kidus, happy baby boy from Ethiopia, to treat his birth condition of his bladder.

Impact

Sakhi has funded healthcare for 54 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Sakhi

Kidus is a cute baby boy who loves to walk. His dad enjoys walking with him and holding his hand, and Kidus loves it when his mom carries him on her back. He also loves to watch cartoons. Kidus's dad and mom love each other so much and have a happy life together. Kidus's father is a tailor. His income is very limited and barely enough to sustain the family through the month, but love fills their home, and their lives, with happiness. When Kidus was born his parents learned that he had bladder exstrophy, a rare condition where children are born with an open bladder. His parents faced a challenge that they did not expect in their life, but they are facing it with courage. Kidus needs surgery to perform a procedure to divert his urination to the anal opening & make a pouch bladder from the bowel. He will undergo this surgery on September 28th with our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) and his family needs $1,500 for the procedure. Kidus's dad said, “For thirteen days after his birth we worked hard to get him treatment but no one in the health centres could help us. Some health workers gave us hope and some health workers did not give us any hope." He is hopeful for after surgery, “After he gets his surgery and recovers I want to tell him the truth about his condition and what we went through as a result of it when he grows up. Also, I want to tell him how he got the treatment, about the people who helped him, how God helped him and gave him this healthy life. I will tell him this so he grows up grateful and he lives to support and help others. I want him to be good and caring and God-fearing. I want him to be there for others. I believe kindness is contagious.”

99%funded
$1,493raised
$7to go

Alamunyaki is an 11-year-old boy and the fourth born in a family of five children. Alamunyaki is a very social and hard-working boy. He has not had the chance to join school due to his parent’s financial challenges. There is hope for Alamunyaki joining school because one of his uncles has offered to take him and support him in school next year. It is also Alamunyaki’s uncle who decided to seek treatment for his nephew who has burn contracture on his right hand from the elbow all the way down to the wrist and fingers, making it impossible for him to hold things with the hand. Alamunyaki’s parents are small scale farmers of maize and vegetables, which they mostly use for their own consumption and sell what they can of the harvest in order to get money to buy other commodities. They also have a few goats which Alamunyaki and his siblings help their parents in grazing. Alamunyaki was involved in a fire accident when he was two years old. He was at the fireplace with his siblings warming themselves while their mother was preparing dinner. Alamunyaki was dressed in his traditional maasai clothing which caught fire by accident. Alamunyaki sustained a severe burn and needed to be taken to the hospital but due to his parent’s financial constraints they couldn’t take him and treated him at home using herbal and traditional medicines. The skin around the burns has contracted making it impossible for him to use his right hand. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Alamunyaki receive treatment. On March 3rd, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery to he will be able to use his. Now, their family needs help to fund this $639 procedure. Alamunyaki’s uncle says: “I would like my nephew to go to school next year but I understand it’s not going to be easy if he does not have his right hand correct. Kindly help him because his parents cannot afford the cost.”

$639raised
Fully funded

Tibarimbasa is a 60-year-old lady from Uganda. She shared with us that over the course of her life, she has had 12 pregnancies all together; including three miscarriages and one lost one-year-old child. Her firstborn is 38 years old, and her last born is now 19 years old. Tibarimbasa and her husband are both small scale farmers, but her husband has had to stop for the time being due to his health condition. For the last two years, Tibarimbasa has been experiencing severe abdominal pains. She has continually visited a couple of health units for treatment, which have only managed to give her medication providing short-term relief. Tibarimbasa reports that she experiences pains all over her body, especially in her arms and her back. The pain prevents her from bending over during farming, which has affected her crop production. She occasionally suffers from mild headaches, and finds it difficult to comfortably turn while she is resting in bed. Upon arriving at Rushoroza Hospital, Tibarimbasa was diagnosed with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. If not treated, she could develop endometrial cancer. Her existing pains could worsen and stop her from doing her usual day to day activities completely. Her family currently cannot afford the surgery charges, and appeal for financial help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Tibarimbasa's surgery. On December 11th, she will undergo a hysterectomy at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Tibarimbasa will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve. Tibarimbasa shared, “I pray that I may be considered for surgery because my family cannot afford the surgery charges. I will resume farming as soon as possible to be able to take good care of my family.”

$228raised
Fully funded

Pamela is wheeled into the consultation room wincing in pain. She briefly smiles but gets back to a serious face. Pamela is a widow whose husband passed away in 1993. After his passing, family conflicts forced her to move from their home village in Migori and settle in a crowded, more run-down neighborhood near Eastleigh. She used to work as a tailor but, after she needed a wheelchair in 2011, she has been unable to work. Pamela lives in a single room tin-roofed house and the local church helps to support her rent. She doesn’t have an ID so it has been hard for her to access local services such as medical support. Pamela told us that she has been relying on well-wishers and their local church for survival and her closest relatives live in Migori and rarely are able to offer her support. Pamela arrived to the hospital with bladder calculus with recurrent UTI that requires an urgent cystolithotomy, a curative laparotomy procedure, to aid relieve her stomach pains that have been recurrent for many years now. According to her neighbors who brought her to the facility, she had been in severe pain the whole night, and the medicine that she received from a nearby dispensary were not helping her. Pamela has been through a lot medically and socially. In late 2011, she suffered from TB of her spine and underwent spinal surgery. She has been using a wheelchair since then. In mid-2017, her stomach pains started and in November 2019, she underwent several tests and was booked for surgery at a hospital. She didn’t have funds so she went back home and continued managing her pains with pain medication. Upon hearing about Watsi's Medical Partner Kijabe Hospital, she came hoping for treatment. On November 7th this year, she was reviewed by the doctors and several tests were done which revealed her condition and need for surgery. She was discharged home and booked for a follow up appointment and possible surgery next week (November 23rd) but because of the pains, she was rushed back to the hospital. Pamela shared with us, “This is my only option to get rid of the pains. I have tried several medications but they are not working. I really need assistance to get this surgery. “

$616raised
Fully funded

Scholastica is a 6-month-old baby girl from Tanzania. She is the last born in a family of six children. Scholastica was born a healthy child but, at four months of age, her mother noticed her head was growing very fast and she was not able to support it. They could not afford the cost of seeking care at the regional hospital at the time. Scholastica's parents are small scale farmers and work hard to make ends meet with their income. Eventually, they were able to get some money from relatives and took her back to the regional hospital. There, Scholastica was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Without treatment, Scholastica will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Unfortunately, she was not able to get an appointment at the regional hospital for a long time. As time went on, Scholastica's condition grew worse. Her head increased in size and her eyes began rolling down. Though they were concerned, her parents could not raise money to seek an alternative hospital for care. Eventually, their friend referred them to our medical partner's care center, ALMC Plaster House. Their friends and neighbours supported them with bus fare for the two-day journey to the hospital. Now, she is scheduled for an ETV surgery to treat her condition, and the family appeals for financial support for this procedure. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of ETV surgery for Scholastica that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 25th and will drain the excess fluid from Scholastica's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. It will also reduce the likelihood of severe fevers, vomiting, and potential brain damage. With proper treatment, Scholastica will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Scholastica’s mother shared, "We travelled for two days because we were told there is hope for my daughter to get help. Please help save her.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded