Thailand

Showing all patients at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital

Khin

Khin is a 39-year-old woman who lives with her family in Hpa-An Township, Karen State, Burma. Both her children are in preschool. She and her husband are subsistence farmers, growing rice during the rainy season on rented land. The rest of the year, her husband collects leaves used to make roofs, works as a daily labourer or collects branches to sell. Khin was born with a scar the size of an ant bite on her upper lip. Her parents thought that it would disappear or heal on its own but the scar developed into a growth and increased in size. Her parents passed away when she was young and after that she went to live with her brother’s family. By the time she was around 20 years old, the growth had become large and soft, covering the area between her upper lips and her nose. When the pain became unbearable in 2005, her uncle dropped her off at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Thailand, a free clinic close to where her uncle used to work. At this point, the growth had become so large that dragged her upper lip down and extended into her nostrils. At MTC, she was seen by doctors and medics, before she was diagnosed with a hemangioma. At this point, the growth had worsened, and she was bleeding from her lips. In April 2006, Khin went to Chiang Mai Hospital and had the hemangioma removed surgically. The growth later has returned. Overtime, the hemangioma has increased in size and become hard. It has now expanded into Khin’s nostrils, especially her left nostril, which causes her to have difficulty breathing at times. She feels uncomfortable but is not in pain. Sometimes she also feels like she has a blood clot in her nostrils during her nosebleeds. Because the nosebleed can start at any time and can last anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, her life revolves around managing her nosebleeds. She is unable to work or sleep properly, and if she is about to have a nosebleed, she is unable to eat. The nosebleeds have also affected her ability to earn an income for her children and continues to impact her social life. “When I socialise, I do not feel comfortable and some people think I have a disease that I can infect them with,” said Khin. “So, I hope to get better after surgery, and I hope I will no longer have nosebleeds. I don’t want to bleed, and I want to socialise with my friends and family happily. [Right now] my friends won’t even touch me.”

84% funded

84%funded
$1,268raised
$232to go
Naw Htee

Naw Htee is a 30-year-old woman from Thailand. In 2006, Naw Htee and her family fled from Karen State, Burma to Thailand because there were conflicts between the armed groups and the country's military in their village. She now lives in a refugee camp with her family. In 2010, Naw Htee felt a severe toothache while she and her parents were visiting her village in Burma. She went to the nearest local clinic, where she had her molar teeth extracted. After the procedure, Naw Htee was in extreme pain; she could not even open her mouth as she used to. She was told that pain after tooth extraction is normal and that the pain will be diminished if she takes painkillers. Naw Htee tolerated the pain and hoped for the pain to be gone. Since then, Naw Htee could barely open her mouth. Naw Htee was too afraid to tell about her condition to anyone. She carried this burden for almost 9 years, until she decided to seek help. She then visited the clinic in the refugee camp. After trying oral medication and since her condition remained the same, she was referred to Mae Sariang General Hospital (MSGH) in July 2019. There, she received an x-ray, and the doctor diagnosed her with Ankylosis of the Temporamandibular joint [TMJ], stiffness of a joint due to abnormal adhesion and rigidity of the bones of the joint of jaw. She was then referred on to Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) as MSGH does not have capacity to treat her condition. Once at CMH, the doctor told Naw Htee that she needs to undergo a special x-ray prior to receiving treatment. Doctors want Naw Htee to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose her condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $469 to cover the cost of Naw Htee's CT scan and care, scheduled for February 5th. Naw Htee mentioned, “I wanted to be a healthy, strong and supportive mother, even without the support of their father.”

48% funded

48%funded
$335raised
$358to go
Sar

Sar is a four-year-old girl from Thailand who lives with her parents and three sisters. Her mother is a homemaker, looking after household chores, while her father works as an agriculture day laborer. In her spare time, Sar likes to play with toys with her friends. Seven months ago, when Sar was on the way to buy snacks, a hen suddenly flew over to her and poked her right eye, protecting her baby chickens. Although Sar's eye turned red, her parents did not take her to any hospitals. They bought eye drops for her, but the medicine did not make her feel any better. Sar underwent a CT scan at Mae Sot Hospital but the doctor was not able to help her. She was referred to Chiang Mai and there she underwent an MRI. After the MRI, the doctor recommended surgery to remove her right eye. She received enucleation of her eye on July 25th, 2019. After enucleation, the doctor recommended an MRI to see if there is any problem post operation. She is now admitting in the hospital and will undergo the MRI on 25th February, 2020. Doctors want Sar to have an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs, to help them continue to follow an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $968 to cover the cost of Sar's MRI and care, scheduled for February 25th. Sar's father said, "My daughter is healthy and playing happily with friends after we came back from treatment in Chiang Mai. The doctor told me that they will do MRI for my daughter to check if there is any abnormal growth or problem after surgery and if there is no problem after the MRI result, the doctor will implant an artificial eye in the next eight month for my daughter."

19% funded

19%funded
$185raised
$783to go
Myat

Myat is a two-month-old boy who lives with his family in Hpa-An Town, Karen State, Burma. His father passed away when his mother was two months pregnant with him. Myat’s mother is a homemaker and she takes care of him at home. All of his sister and brothers are students. Myat’s grandfather drives a tricycle taxi. On 6 June 2019, Myat was born without any complications at HGH. Since he was born, his mother noticed that he has been passing white coloured stools, but she did not do anything about it because she thought it was normal. When he was just over a month old, his mother noticed that Myat’s navel was bigger than normal. His mother then took him to HGH. The doctor examined his navel and told his mother not to worry too much and he also told her come back if it becomes bigger. A few days later, Myat’s mother noticed that his navel has become bigger and his mother took him to the hospital again. The doctor again took a look at Myat’s navel and advised his mother to take him to a hospital in Yangon for treatment. However, Myat’s mother did not have money to go to Yangon. On 6 September 2019 Myat received an X-ray at Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) and was given a diagnosis of a bulging navel and biliary atresia, a childhood disease of the liver in which one or more bile ducts are abnormally narrow, blocked, or absent. Currently, Myat still passes white coloured stools. He also has a bulging navel which never goes away. His mother is very much worried for him, especially that she just learned about his liver disease. Myat’s mother said, “I would like him to be like other children. I feel bad for him but at the same time happy that an organization Burma Children Medical Fund will help him for his treatment.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Ngwe

Ngwe is a 63-year-old woman from Burma. She and her husband work on their small farm, growing rice for their own consumption. In the off season, they grow cucumbers in their backyard and sell them so they can buy food. They have three children, and they are all married and live on their own. In August 2019, Ngwe’s granddaughter accidentally hit her in her right eye. Although her eye became painful and swollen, the symptoms receded after three days. In mid October, while Ngwe was cultivating in her farm, Ngwe began to experience a blurry vision in her right eye. She also has pain in both her right upper and lower eyelids. These symptoms have made it increasingly difficult for her to see clearly. Ngwe was diagnosed with retinal detachment, a condition in which the retina pulls away from the supportive tissue in the eye, resulting in vision loss. If left untreated, she could lose vision completely. Ngwe is scheduled to undergo surgery to reattach her retina on December 17th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. After his surgery, Ngwe's vision will hopefully be restored, and she will resume her daily activities comfortably. Ngwe said, “I’ve always been careful not to be in debt. But now, I had to borrow money from a neighbour! If not my eye but some other body part, I would not even seek treatment. It’s a difficult feeling. I need my eyesight back so that I can move around more easily and be more productive with my work.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
So

So is a 40-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his family in Myawaddy Township, Karen State. He is a carpenter while his wife is a homemaker. His mother is retired, and his son goes to school. In his free time, So loves to read the newspaper and magazines, as well as going to the pagoda. In mid-2016, So felt lightheaded one day while working. His friend rushed him to the nearest clinic where the doctor completed a physical examination. He was told that his lightheartedness was caused by the hot weather and he was told to drink more water. The following day, So felt lightheaded and developed a headache. He went to the clinic near his house, where he received an injection and oral medication. This time the doctor told him that his symptoms were due to hypertension and told him to come back to the clinic if he did not feel better. So underwent MRI on 14th of September 2019. The result of MRI shows that there is extraaxial mass with rim calcification along right frontal convexity. The doctor told So that he requires surgery to remove the mass. Presently, So still experiences frequent headaches and bouts of dizziness. He cannot sleep well, and he has trouble focusing. So sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. he is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on October 24th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. So said, "I am ready for surgery. I believe that I will be healthy after that. Now, after taking medications from the hospital, I feel like I have less headache and less dizziness."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
So

So is a 40-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his family in Myawaddy Township, Karen State. He is a carpenter while his wife is a homemaker. His mother is retired, and his son goes to school. In mid-2016, So felt lightheaded one day while working. His friend rushed him to the nearest clinic where the doctor completed a physical examination. He was told that his lightheartedness was caused by the hot weather and he was told to drink more water. The following day, So felt lightheaded and developed a headache. He went to the clinic near his house, where he received an injection and oral medication. This time the doctor told him that his symptoms were due to hypertension and told him to come back to the clinic if he did not feel better. Two days later, So went back to the clinic. The doctor completed a physical examination and suspected So has a problem with nervous system. He was treated with medications but he does not feel better. Currently, So still experiences frequent headaches and bouts of dizziness. He cannot sleep well, and he has trouble focusing. Doctors want So to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $814 to cover the cost of So's MRI and care, scheduled for September 14th. So said, “I need to stay strong for my family. I want to have a successful surgery and I want to continue to support my family.”

100% funded

$814raised
Fully funded
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