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Success! Jackson from Tanzania raised $689 to fund a mass removal.

Jackson
100%
  • $689 raised, $0 to go
$689
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Jackson's treatment was fully funded on January 14, 2020.

Photo of Jackson post-operation

November 25, 2019

Jackson underwent a mass removal.

Jackson had a successful surgery that has helped remove the congenital mass on his left leg that was increasing in size each making walking painful and difficult for him. Through this treatment, he is now able to walk well and without pain that was caused by the mass. He is still going on with regular dressing of his post-surgical wound.

Jackson’s mother says, “I am so happy to see my son’s leg normal for the first time all because of your help. Thank so much.”

Jackson had a successful surgery that has helped remove the congenital mass on his left leg that was increasing in size each making walking ...

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October 15, 2019

Jackson is an only child from Tanzania. Both of his parents depend on small scale farming of maize and vegetables and only sell a few crop harvests and do not make much income.

Jackson traveled to our medical partner’s care center to receive treatment. On October 16th, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, Jackson needs help to raise $689 to fund this procedure.

Jackson’s father says, “We have tried to seek treatment for our son ever since he was born with no luck. The doctors at your hospital can treat him but we can’t afford the cost, help us. ”

Jackson is an only child from Tanzania. Both of his parents depend on small scale farming of maize and vegetables and only sell a few crop h...

Read more

Jackson's Timeline

  • October 15, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Jackson was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Tanzania.

  • October 16, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Jackson received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC). Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 22, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Jackson's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 25, 2019
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Jackson's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • January 14, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Jackson's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 20 donors

Funded by 20 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $689 for Jackson's treatment
Hospital Fees
$577
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$11
Supplies
$49
Labs
$52
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There are so many different kinds of masses so it is difficult to state what the significance is.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The process depends on the location of the mass and whether it is cancerous or benign.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but just watching the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Cha

Cha is a 20-year-old young man from Burma. He lives with his father, older sister, brother-in-law, and three nieces in Hpapun Township of Karen State. Cha is a student and his oldest niece goes to school while the other two are still too young to attend. His father and brother-in-law are subsistence farmers while his sister is a homemaker. In his spare time, Cha loves to play cane ball and football with his friends. He also likes to help his family with farming during school holidays. Cha goes to the nearest high school to his village, located four to five hours away by motorbike in the village of Day Bu Noh. During the school year he lives in a dormitory and he does not have to pay for school and dormitory fees. On May 6th, Cha was getting ready to move back home for the summer holidays. He borrowed his friend’s motorbike and started the trip back to his village. Not long after he left Day Bu Noh Village, his motorcycle slipped on the uneven dirt road and he fell from the motorcycle. The next thing Cha remembered was waking up at a clinic in Day Bu Noh Village with his friend beside him. When he asked his friend what had happened, his friend told him that some of the villagers had found him unconscious on the side of the road and brought him to the clinic. The medic at the clinic examined Cha and told him that his lower jaw was fractured but they could not treat him at the clinic. The medic gave him injections and oral medications to help control the pain. Cha’s friend, who works for the district’s office in the Day Bu Noh village, told his superiors about Cha’s situation and that Cha did not know how he could receive treatment at another clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand where another friend works. However, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, Thailand had shut its borders to neighboring countries. His friend’s superiors were able to arrange for Cha to be brought to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), accompanied by Cha’s friend. Cha was discharged from the clinic in Day Bu Noh Village on May 15th and started to make their way to MTC. After they crossed over into Thailand on a boat, Chan and his friend arrived at MTC on May 16th. At the clinic, the medic examined Cha before telling him that he will have to go to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for an x-ray. He also received some oral pain medication from the medic and, on May 20th, Cha received an x-ray at MSH. The x-ray showed that Cha had fractured his lower jaw in two locations, the left side and in the middle, as well as that the fracture was now infected. He was told that he will need to receive injections to treat the infection and that he will need surgery to help his jaw heal properly. Currently, Cha’s jaw is swollen and painful. He cannot eat solid food and is only able to eat boiled rice and drink liquid food. One of his teeth hurts and he cannot open his mouth wide. He is not able to speak properly, and his lower jaw is extremely painful, especially on the left side. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Cha will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for May 29th and will cost $1,500. The surgery will help Cha to be free from the pain and he will be able to talk properly again. “I feel sad that I cannot help my family during this summer holiday,” Cha said. In the future, Cha said that he plans to continue his studies next year at Mu Traw Junior College in Day Bu Noh Village. He is also interested in working with his friend at the district office in the branch that looks after the environment, forest, and wild animals.

79% funded

79%funded
$1,186raised
$314to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.