Chandra's Story

Chandra joined Watsi on August 18th, 2013. Six years ago, Chandra joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Chandra's most recent donation supported Vichheka, a 26-year-old mother from Cambodia, to fund contracture release surgery.

Impact

Chandra has funded healthcare for 82 patients in 11 countries.

Patients funded by Chandra

Kenay is a sweet eleven-month-old baby boy from Ethiopia who loves to play with his mom. He is the fourth child of his parents. Kenay has started weaning and is eating Plumpy Nut, a nutrition supplement donated by the government and organizations to children with malnutrition, as Kenay was underweight. Kenay’s dad is a farmer and has land, but because of the drought, they couldn’t harvest enough, even for the family’s consumption. Initially, Kenay got his emergency colostomy from Sekota Hospital, which was supported by the community. However, he became so sick and underweight that his mother and some family members lost hope in his ability to survive. Fortunately, his mom heard about our medical partner’s care center, BethanyKids, from a social worker, and upon learning that they could get treatment for his condition, their hope increased. Bethany Kids covered the family’s transportation and accommodation to bring Kenay to the hospital, where the medical team first put him on a nutrition program for over four months to treat malnutrition. Now, Kenay’s weight is normal, and he is fit for surgery. Kenay was born with an anorectal malformation, a congenital abnormality that leads to a complete or partial intestinal blockage. He needs to undergo a series of procedures to eliminate bowel dysfunction. The long journey with multiple issues with his colostomy care has significantly impacted the psychological health of his parents, and they are requesting financial assistance with his surgery cost. Kenay is scheduled to undergo surgery to correct his condition on November 22nd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is requesting $1,500 to cover Kenay’s procedure and care costs. After his recovery, Kenay will no longer experience bowel dysfunction or be at risk of developing health complications in the future. Kenay’s mom said, “I hope my child will get treatment, and I hope he will heal after the treatment. I hope I will see him growing up and start a decent life.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Fatma is a 50-year-old mother of seven children aged between four and sixteen. She has faced considerable hardship, being a widow and the sole provider for her family, without a steady income. Fatma resides in Somalia, but also depends on the support of her niece that sells tea in Nairobi, Kenya. Unfortunately, she is unable to afford vital medical treatment. Since 2021, Fatma has been experiencing a persistent bloated feeling and discomfort in her lower abdomen. Initially treated for brucellosis and yellow fever at a local facility without improvement, the growth in her abdomen continued to enlarge, prompting both health concerns and a sense of self-consciousness due to the enlarged mass. She traveled to Kenya to seek medical advice, and further examination in Wajir suggested ovarian cancer, and the need for surgery. However, due to financial constraints, she sought help at our medical partner's care center, AIC Kijabe Hospital. Here, the diagnosis confirmed a large non-cancerous abdominal pelvic mass that needed to be removed through surgery. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Fatma receive treatment. On March 22nd, surgeons at AIC Kijabe Hospital will perform a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO) procedure to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer and prevent future surgery for benign ovarian masses. Now, Fatma needs help to fund this $1,260 procedure. Fatma is hopeful as she awaits the surgery that promises relief. She says, “I look like a seven-month pregnant lady because of the growth. It is painful. I hope to get treatment so that this pain can go away.”

$628raised
$632to go

Thaw is a two-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and elder sister in Zee Kone Village, but his family migrated to Thailand four months ago to seek better job opportunities. His father works as an agricultural day labourer, while his mother is a homemaker. Thaw’s elder brother and sister take turns working as agricultural day labourers. Thaw’s mother carefully manages their income, and their combined family income is enough to cover their daily basic expenses. Thaw receives free healthcare services at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC). On 2 July 2021, Thaw was born through emergency caesarean section. His mother noticed on the following day, while cleaning Thaw’s body, that he was born with a worrying condition that makes it challenging to go to the bathroom. Thaw’s mother immediately informed the doctor, who then referred Thaw to hospital in Ayeyarwady Division. Unfortunately, due to a lack of facilities, he did not receive the necessary treatment at this hospital. He was subsequently recommended to go to Yangon Hospital. However, due to financial limitations, Thaw’s mother could not afford to take him to Yangon Hospital, leading her to cease efforts to seek Thaw’s treatment. Fortunately, Thaw was able to defecate through a fistula however Thaw began to experience troubling symptoms, including at present, Thaw is passing stool through the fistula, experiencing constipation with bowel movements occurring every four or five days, with a distended abdomen. Thaw has been diagnosed with imperforate anus with fistula and his doctors recommend a colostomy. A colostomy is a surgery that creates an opening for the colon through the abdomen. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1500 to fund Thaw's surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital scheduled January 31st. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully alleviate him symptoms. Thaw’s mother expressed her concerns saying, “I want my son to have a healthy, long life. I was always worried about him, and he couldn’t receive treatment due to lack of money. Now, with the help of BCMF and donors, he can undergo surgery. Thank you."

$1,338raised
$162to go

Nay is a 31-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his mother, two sisters, two brothers-in-law, two nephews, and two nieces in a village in Karen State along the Burma border. Nay works in Thailand as a day laborer, spending one week working in Mae Sot and then returning for two days to his village. Nay’s mother is retired and one of his sisters is a homemaker, taking care of her children. The other sister and two brothers-in-law are day laborers on a farm in Karen State. They also grow vegetables for family consumption. His nephews and one niece go to school. Their monthly income is enough for basic needs and they make an effort to pay for basic health care. In his free time, Nay enjoys helping in his community and fixing electronic items. In July 2023, Nay began to experience blurred vision in his right eye. He has intermittent pain and discharge. These symptoms have made it increasingly difficult for him to see clearly. Nay feels uncomfortable seeing only with his left eye and feels sad and depressed about his condition. Nay was diagnosed with retinal detachment, a condition in which the retina pulls away from the supportive tissue in the eye, resulting in vision loss. If left untreated, he could lose vision entirely in the right eye. Nay is scheduled to undergo surgery to reattach his retina on January 18th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the cost of this procedure and care. After the surgery, Nay's vision will hopefully be restored, and he will resume his daily activities comfortably. Nay said “I was stuck and hopeless while the doctor was telling me that I would need a surgery. I don’t even know how to explain about my health problem to my family. I worry they will feel so sad and worry about me. I am unhappy and feel tired emotionally. After learning that I have donors who will help me paying for my treatment in Chiang Mai, I feel like my hope has returned and I'm wishing my vision would repair and I'll be able to continue my career in the future."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Davies is a 14-year-old student in the 9th grade. He is the firstborn in a family of 3 children. His parents separated a few years ago, and both he and his siblings were left in the custody of his mother who is working hard to raise them well. His mother sells utensils in a local market to provide for the family. During the school holidays in March this year, Davies stepped on a broken glass that left him with a deep cut on his foot. His mother took him to a health center where the bleeding was managed and the wound was stitched. However, after a few days back in school, his leg started to swell. He was diagnosed with a blood infection and given medication. The recovery was smooth and the swelling stopped, leaving a small blister on the leg. Davies started to walk again and went back to school. However, after a few weeks, the blister got worse. He has undergone an emergency debridement surgery, he urgently requires a flap cover surgery to heal. The condition has made it difficult for him to walk and attend school. Fortunately, our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) is helping Davies receive treatment. On September 8th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to help him walk easily again and resume his studies. Davies's family needs help raising $1,185 to fund the procedure and treatment. Davies’ mother says, “This treatment has really destabilized me and I can't provide for them as I used to. Davies loves school and he really wants to go back.”

$1,185raised
Fully funded