Timothy Y HahnMONTHLY DONOR
Timothy's Story

Timothy joined Watsi on December 3rd, 2014. Six years ago, Timothy joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Timothy's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Sylvia, a future doctor from Kenya, to fund clubfoot repair surgery.

Impact

Timothy has funded healthcare for 80 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Timothy

Jelly is a 50-year-old woman living in Thailand. She lives with her youngest son, cousin, younger brother, sister-in-law as well as her niece and nephew in Mae La Refugee Camp. In the camp, Jelly and her household receive 1,200 baht (approx. 40 USD) every month on a cash card, to purchase rations. Jelly looks after the household chores, while her cousin and her sister-in-law are teachers at a school, each earning 1,000 baht (approx. 34 USD) per month. Her brother is a famous cook in the camp who earns a few hundred baht cooking for public events. Jelly's niece and her son are students, and her other son studies at a migrant school in nearby Mae Sot. She cannot support him financially and he receives a scholarship to study for free. Jelly loves going to church every Sunday with her family, and also loves to play with her niece and nephew. Three months ago, Jelly was brought to Mae Sot Hospital when she developed blurry vision. At the hospital, an ophthalmologist checked both of her eyes. After the examination, the doctor diagnosed her left eye with a cataract, a condition where the lens in the eye gradually becomes clouded. Currently, Jelly can only ascertain if it is dark or bright outside with her left eye. She is unable to see distant things clearly with her right eye. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement eye surgery for Jelly. On February 2nd, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Jelly's natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, Jelly needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Jelly shared, "My blurred vision causes me stress and it is difficult for me to do anything. When I cook, the smoke makes my eyes dry so I cannot see anything and now I am in too much discomfort to cook for my family because of my blurred vision.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Lewis is a 3-year-old boy from Kenya. He the second born of five children in his family. Just two weeks after Lewis was born, Lewis' mother was bathing him at home when she noted that his testes were not descending. She thought this may happen time, but as days and months went on, this did not change. Two years later, Lewis’ parents took him to a nearby hospital for review. Lewis was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Lewis has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. His family was referred to BethanyKids Hospital for further treatment, but his family waited a little over six months to save enough funds to afford the visit. Upon visiting BethanyKids, the doctors recommend he needs an orchidopexy procedure. Lewis’ parents do not have stable jobs. His father is a construction handyman and his mother owns a small eatery in the neighbourhood. The income from both parents is not enough to feed the family of five children. Both parents are determined to see Lewis treated, but they are not in a position to raise the required amount of money. Lewis and his parents are appealing for financial help. Lewis will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo a corrective surgery called a bilateral orchidopexy on December 28th. AMHF is requesting $569 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Lewis' father shared, "I would really like Lewis to have a family of his own in future, but to do so he must undergo a surgery that is way beyond our capability. As a family, we are requesting for financial help to cater for the surgery.”

$569raised
Fully funded

Yar is a 18-year-old girl from Thailand. She lives with her parents, three younger sisters and three younger brothers in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. Yar and her parents are all too ill to work and are homemakers, while her siblings are students. Her family relies on the monthly food allowance they receive from an organization to get by. They also grow vegetables for themselves to supplement this income. Yar completed grade nine, but felt too ill to return to school this year. In her free time, she likes to weave traditional Karen bags for her siblings and help her mother with household chores. One day in early January 2020, Yar started to experience neck pain, fevers, and chills. When she went to the refugee camp’s hospital, run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC), she was diagnosed with tonsillitis and was given oral paink medication and antibiotics. During her follow-up appointment, the medic gave her more of the same medications. After her follow-up appointment, Yar felt a small growth with her tongue inside her bottom left jaw behind her front teeth. She told the medic about this at her next appointment, but it was not checked out and she received more oral medication each week until the beginning of June 2020. During this time, the mass increased in size. In June, she was referred to Umphang Hospital, which then referred her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for surgery. IRC brought Yar to MSH, where she received a physical examination, a CT-scan, and a biopsy of the mass. The CT result indicated that the mass was benign. In July, when she went back to MSH for her follow-up appointment, the doctor removed the mass in her mouth as well as five of her lower front teeth during surgery. Since the surgery, Yar has experienced swelling where the mass was removed. Daily, she experiences an achy pain in her lower left jaw, her neck and her back. The mass has also returned and is increasing in size. IRC referred Yar to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing treatment in Chiang Mai Hospital. After reviewing a CT scan to confirm her diagnosis, the doctor in Chiang Mai recommended she move forward with surgery to remove the tumor. Now, she is scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on December 3rd. She is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Yar shared, "I am scared to receive surgery but I believe that I will be recovered after that so I am happy."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Nay Kaw is an 11-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, two older brothers and two younger sisters in a village in Karen State. Nay Kaw and his sister are both students. He is a grade one student since leaving the monkhood last year. His father is a farmer. Nay Kaw was born with a small mass on his right wrist. Once Nay Kaw's mother was able to save up and send him to Mae Tao Clinic for treatment in Thailand, Nay Kaw had the mass surgically removed in July at Mae Sot Hospital. After surgery, the biopsy revealed that the mass was caused by a hemangioma. As a result of this, the doctor referred him for further treatment in nearby Chiang Mai. Since his surgery, the pain in his wrist has decreased. However, if something touches his right wrist or if he has to carry something heavy in his right hand, he is in a lot of pain. Doctors want Nay Kaw to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $814 to cover the cost of Nay Kaw's MRI and care, scheduled for October 8th. "I want my right hand to be normal and I do not want to have an unusually large wrist," he said. "If the pain in my hand decreases, I will help my mother with the housework. If my hand will be without pain and I will be able to play with my friends at school, I will be happy with my friends again. In the future I will go school and become a good person."

$814raised
Fully funded

Israel is a baby boy from Tanzania and the last-born in a family of two children. His mother delivered him at home with the help of midwives and soon noticed her son's left foot was not straight. She was scared to tell her husband or her parents-in-law as she was scared they might accuse her of bringing disability into their family. It took her almost two months to be able to summon up the courage and inform her husband about their son's condition. Her husband was understanding and they decide to seek a doctor's advice at a local hospital near their village. They were informed that the condition was treatable but they would have to be referred to the district hospital. They inquired on the cost of the treatment but the cost turned out to be too expensive for them to afford. Thus they were forced to return home hoping they would be able to raise the money one day and have their son's foot corrected. Both parents depend on small-scale farming for their living, which they shared is barely enough to meet their basic needs. They heard about the Plaster House from a relative and decide to try seeking help. The medical team shared that Israel has clubfoot of his left foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre, will perform clubfoot repair surgery on September 2nd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Israel's clubfoot repair. After treatment, when he grows up, he will be able to walk easily. Israel’s mother says, “I am scared my son would be discriminated if he does not have this condition corrected. Please help us.”

$935raised
Fully funded