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African Mission Healthcare

12,979 donors have funded healthcare for 7,909 African Mission Healthcare patients.

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African Mission Healthcare is a non-profit organization dedicated to expanding the reach and quality of healthcare in Africa.

AMH operates in 9 African countries. It supported care for over 80,000 people across the continent in 2012 alone. Among other care centers, treatments funded through AMH are provided at Kijabe Hospital in Kenya, Arusha Lutheran Medical Center in Tanzania, and MSM Medical Center in Ethiopia.

AMH’s work has been noted for being rooted in values of sustainability, efficiency, accountability, and commitment to the poor. More information about AMH can be found on its website.

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Byereta

Byereta is a 58-year-old farmer and policeman, and a married father to seven children. Two of his daughters are married, while the other five are still studying in school. His wife is a small scale farmer. He shared that because of having many children in school, he had to acquire loans to pay their school fees and support their family. In February of 2020, Byereta visited the hospital with a swelling that caused him unbearable pain. He was diagnosed with a right inguinal hernia and it was recommended that he have surgery, but he was called for training and never underwent the procedure. After his training, he was re-examined and surgery was again recommended to ensure a complete recovery. Because of the hernia, Byereta has difficulty bending down or carrying out any strenuous activity. If not treated, the hernia may become strangulated. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is helping Byereta to receive treatment. Fortunately, on May 22nd, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at AMH's care center. Now, AMH is requesting $230 to fund Byereta's surgery. Once complete, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Byereta shared, “I have suffered a lot with this condition because my finances can't enable me pay for my bill on my own due to overwhelming bank loans and the little balance I receive. I use it to buy soap, salt, and paraffin to light the lamp at home. My situation is getting worse yet my entire family looks up to me. I kindly ask for your support so that I can regain my health and continue working effectively for the betterment for my health and my family.”

20% funded

20%funded
$46raised
$184to go
Kyomukama

Kyomukama is 50-year-old small scale farmer and a mother to three sons, all whom are still studying in school. She proudly shared that one is at the university in his third year, another one in his first year, and the last one has just completed senior four in school. All of their schooling has been supported by their uncle, who adopted them, as Kyomukama's husband passed away in 2004. Kyomukama first felt pain on her lower abdomen a while ago, but was not overly concerned at the time. She went to a clinic and was given some supportive treatment, which did not completely relieve her of her condition. As her condition got worse, Kyomukama began experiencing other troubling symptoms including pain and discomfort. Due to excessive bleeding, she often felt fatigued or experiences brain fog temporarily. Upon visiting our medical partner's care center, Kyomukama was diagnosed with a uterine myoma, also known as a non-cancerous tumor. She needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $219 to fund Kyomukama's surgery. On May 25th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Kyomukama will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain. Kyomukama shared, “I hope that once I have undergone operation, my health problem will be solved and I will be able to get back to my activities like my farming with ease.”

64% funded

64%funded
$142raised
$77to go
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