African Mission Healthcare

Tanzania

Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC)

Patients at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC)

Noah is a 3-year-old boy from Tanzania. He is the second-to-last child in a family of 4 children. His family resides in a remote village known in Simanjiro, Tanzania. Noah’s mother is a homemaker and also assists her husband with agricultural activities, given that farming is their primary source of sustenance and income. Noah takes pleasure in helping others and enjoys solving puzzles alongside his friends. When Noah was merely eight months old, he was crawling around the house and ventured into the kitchen alone, just as his mother was occupied with washing chores. Inadvertently, he encountered a pan which slipped from the stove, causing hot water to spill onto the left side of his body, resulting in severe burns on his left armpit and elbow. Noah’s parents swiftly transported him to the nearest medical facility for urgent treatment. After receiving initial first aid, he was subsequently discharged with instructions for proper wound care. Despite these efforts, his wounds took two months to fully heal. Even after healing, noticeable damage to the skin remained on his left axilla (armpit) and elbow, which subsequently restricted the range of motion in his left arm, leading to his discomfort while crawling. The gravity of the situation became apparent to Noah’s parents, who were initially unaware of the necessity for further medical intervention to enhance their son’s quality of life. Noah was diagnosed with burn scar contractures affecting his left axilla and elbow. The contractures tighten the skin around the arm such that he is unable to use his hand without discomfort. Recognizing the significance of their son’s well-being, Noah’s parents humbly seek assistance to ensure he receives the requisite treatment to enhance his quality of life. Fortunately, our medical partner African Mission Healthcare (AMH) is helping Noah receive treatment. On August 14th, surgeons will perform a burn contracture release surgery to enable him to use his hand with ease and improve his quality of life. AMH needs help raising $874 to fund the procedure. Noah’s father says, “We are excited for his treatment as this condition has made him less interactive with his peers, and we are hopeful for a positive outcome from the treatment."

$555raised
$319to go

Nageli is an 11-year-old girl, living in a small, remote village in Ngorongoro, Tanzania. She is a diligent student, currently attending primary school. While she aspires to become a nurse, she and her family - her parents and two siblings - live within the confines of a Maasai society, so that her family’s sustenance and income revolve around livestock husbandry. When Nageli was five years old, her mother entrusted her to retrieve a flask of hot tea from the kitchen. On her way back to her mother, Nageli stumbled, spilling the hot tea onto her neck. Due to their village's remoteness, and the absence of a nearby health center, the family administered first aid at home. Because proper wound care wasn't available, Nageli endured a prolonged healing process. While traditional remedies were employed, her wound persisted for three to four months. During an outreach visit to their village, a team from our medical partner encountered Nageli, and informed her parents about a potential treatment for their daughter’s condition. With the aid of their church community, Nageli and her father undertook the journey to our medical partner's facility, hoping to find a solution for the burn scar contractures that have developed, stiffening Nageli's neck, and limiting her neck's range of motion. Fortunately, African Mission Healthcare is helping Nageli receive treatment. On August 16th, surgeons will perform a burn contracture release surgery to ease the stiffness in Nageli's neck, which will improve her range of motion. Now, her family needs your help to fund this $639 procedure. Nageli says: “I wish to walk and have fun again with my friends while going for long walks to fetch water and firewood.”

$300raised
$339to go

Baraka is a 15-year-old boy who is in fifth grade, and resides with his uncle in Arusha. Seven of Baraka's ten siblings have passed away, as has his mother, after a prolonged bout of ill health. Baraka's father lives in a different region of the country, and has entrusted his care to the uncle, who has six children of his own. When Baraka was a young child, he fell onto a lighted stack of firewood while playing. He sustained severe burns - which were successfully treated - but which have left him with residual scar contractures around his mouth, and on and under his arm. Baraka lived with these contractures for a long time, until he met a neighbor, who told Baraka and his uncle about Plaster House. Baraka's uncle was unable to bring Baraka to Plaster House, so their neighbor, Charles, undertook to do so. Baraka is looking forward to treatment, as the contractures have negatively affected his confidence when he is interacting with other people. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Baraka receive the care that he needs. On August 16th, surgeons will perform burn contracture release surgery, which will enable Baraka to have improved mobility, functionality and appearance. Now, he needs your help to fund this $874 procedure. Baraka says: “I desire an improvement in my facial appearance. Right now, I lack confidence in how I look. I hold the hope that this treatment will bring about a substantial transformation in my appearance.”

$310raised
$564to go

Mabasa is a four-year-old child from Tanzania. Like any other child, he is filled with dreams, curiosity, and a boundless spirit. He comes from a mid-sized family with five siblings. However, his journey has taken an unexpected turn that threatens to overshadow his bright future. Born to hardworking farming parents, Mabasa was a healthy and joyful baby. Yet, at age two, he began to experience a troubling transformation that has left his family deeply concerned. Mabasa’s parents, dedicated farmers who work relentlessly to provide for their family, noticed something amiss when their son’s legs started to bend as he took his first steps. This struck them with concern and fear. The condition worsened as months passed, casting a shadow of uncertainty over their child’s future. Mabasa was diagnosed with left genu valgus. Colloquially known as "knock-knee," genu valgum is a condition in which the knees bend inward, and can cause pain, difficulty walking, and arthritis. Mabasa's left leg has curved inward, affecting his mobility. To their dismay, the doctors could find no apparent cause for Mabasa’s condition and suggested a healthy nutrition regimen and medications to improve his overall health. Mabasa’s parents followed these recommendations, but despite their unwavering efforts, there was no sign of improvement. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Mabasa. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 14th. Treatment will hopefully restore Mabasa's mobility, allowing him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Mabasa’s father says, “I wish for my son to have a bright future and that this condition won’t be a problem in the future.”

$584raised
$296to go

Catherine is a three year old toddler and is the second child in a family of two children. She lives in Tanzania. She is a quiet and laid-back child who doesn’t speak much. She enjoys spending time with her mother, who is employed as a pharmacist. This sometimes requires her mother to take her to work. Catherine’s father is a carpenter, crafting furniture in Mpanda. Both parents work diligently to meet their family’s needs, but their income is limited, preventing them from covering substantial medical expenses. Catherine has clubfoot of both legs. She began displaying signs of bowed legs when she started walking. Her legs gradually bowed outward, and while the defect was mild, it worsened as she grew older. This condition causes discomfort when she walks, making it challenging to ascend stairs or squat. During one of our partner's outreach visits, the medical team had the opportunity to meet Catherine and her parents. After a brief assessment, the team diagnosed her with fluorosis and bilateral bowleggedness. Following our visit, the family was advised to seek treatment at the medical centre. In August, after a two-day journey, Catherine arrived at the centre. She quickly felt at ease, as she was familiar with some of the medical team members. Following an initial meeting, she was scheduled to see an orthopaedic surgeon. Fortunately, Catherine's family traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, The Plaster House NGO. There, the team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 14th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $935 to fund Catherine's clubfoot repair. After treatment, her legs will be corrected and she can grow up active and healthy. Catherine’s mother says, “I wish my daughter to be better, this condition limits her so much and I feel sorry for her because she has a hard time keeping up with her friends.”

$776raised
$159to go

Simwenda is a three-year-old boy from Tanzania. He resides in a village in the Mpanda district. His parents, hardworking farmers, work daily to provide for their family’s subsistence needs. Simwenda was born with a clubfoot - a birth abnormality in which the foot is twisted out of shape or position. The tissues connecting the muscles to the bone (tendons) are shorter than usual, causing the foot to twist and making walking and wearing shoes difficult. Simwenda’s parents, with limited resources and no access to medical insurance, could only watch their son’s condition worsen for three years. It broke their hearts to see him suffer. The nearest hospital could not provide the treatment he needed. Simwenda’s parents shared their son’s story with their community, hoping for help and learned that services would be available at the Plaster House, a care center of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). However, Simwenda's parents encountered a significant obstacle in obtaining care: transportation costs. Their village is hundreds of miles from Arusha, where the medical care center is located. Simwenda’s family organized a fundraising event to raise money for the transportation and additional expenses of the journey. Upon Simwenda’s arrival at the center, he received a warm welcome. The medical team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 15. AMH is requesting $935 to fund Simwenda's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk with less struggle. Simwende’s mother says: “Despite our financial situations, we have tried so hard to get him treatment. I hope this time around our son has a chance to get treatment.”

$832raised
$103to go

John is a 2-month-old baby from Tanzania. He resides in a modest home with his parents and two siblings. His mother is a devoted stay-at-home mother, while his father works as a carpenter. His father’s income is enough to cover the family’s basic needs. After John's birth, the doctors realized he was born with a congenital condition and advised his mother to seek specialized care. His right foot was twisted inward and downward. They started him on casting at the hospital for three weeks, hoping it might help him heal. However, it became apparent that his condition was more complex and would require surgical intervention as the only viable option to give John a chance at a more mobile and fulfilling life. However, the financial burden proved to be overwhelming for John’s family. Living on a modest income, they could not afford the surgical treatment cost. They had to make a hard decision to stop their son’s treatment. Sometime after discontinuing their son’s treatment, John’s mother learned about our medical partner the Plaster House and the services it provides. Fueled by love and hope for her son, she sought assistance from the center. John underwent a comprehensive wellness assessment; however, the family cannot raise money for his treatment and is appealing for financial assistance. John has clubfoot on his right foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. The Plaster House team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 19. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $935 to fund John's clubfoot repair. After treatment and as he grows he will be able to walk comfortably, wear shoes, enjoy playtime with his peers, and reassure his parents that their son is free from disability. John’s mother says: “I hope my son’s treatment will be smooth and he will turn out okay after his treatment.”

$767raised
$168to go

Samwel is a five-month-old baby from Gilalumpa, Tanzania. He is the youngest child in his family, born into a polygamous family of two wives and eleven children. The family relies on livestock-keeping as their primary livelihood but lack the means to generate sufficient income to cover expenses. They reside in a communal boma or community enclosure consisting of seven small mud huts, each hut divided into two rooms, which accommodate their entire family. Samwel’s mother, Namag, gave birth to him at home, and while the delivery went smoothly, Samwel developed some health issues a few days later. Observing an abnormality in Samwel’s left foot, the family initially took no action as they had no understanding of the condition. When a concerned neighbor noticed his foot, the family sought medical treatment. However, due to their financial situation, the family was unable to afford the necessary care. Fortunately, doctors offering mobile clinic services set up camp near the family's home. Samwel’s parents managed to attend the clinic, where the doctors recommended assistance from Fly Medical Services (FMS) for transportation to Arusha where treatment would be available. Samwel has congenital clubfoot of left foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape or position as the tissues connecting the muscles to the bone (tendons) are shorter than usual. Clubfoot causes difficulty walking and wearing shoes. Samwel's family was able to travel to visit our medical partner's care center, The Plaster House NGO. There, the team will begin clubfoot treatment on September 22nd. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $935 to fund Samwel's clubfoot repair. After treatment, Samwel’s quality of life will significantly improve as he grows. The treatment will enable him to walk comfortably, wear shoes, and alleviate any concerns his parents may have about his condition and his future. Samwel’s mother says: “I would like my son to be well. I want him to enjoy long walks with his brother when he grows up.”

$769raised
$166to go