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Rabira from Ethiopia raised $1,500 to treat anorectal malformation.

Rabira
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Rabira's treatment was fully funded on September 13, 2015.
November 4, 2015

Rabira did not receive surgery as planned.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, shares: “Rabira was scheduled to undergo an anorectoplasty to treat anorectal malformation.” However, in Rabira’s pre-operative appointment, doctors found that in addition to his anorectal malformation, Rabira also has a heart disease. Because the condition was just discovered, Rabira’s surgeon decided not to risk administering anesthesia at this time.

Rabira’s surgery has been cancelled for now, but when he is eligible for surgery, he will be re-eligible for Watsi funding.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, shares: "Rabira was scheduled to undergo an anorectoplasty to treat anorectal ma...

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August 19, 2015

Meet Rabira, an eight-year-old son of peasant farmers from Ethiopia. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), explains: “Rabira was born with a condition called ‘imperforated anus.’ For the last eight years he has lived with a colostomy that enables him to pass stool.”

Also known as anorectal malformation (ARM), Rabira’s condition involves a blockage of stool flow and/or an incorrect alignment of the anus and rectum. Although Rabira has a colostomy, meaning that his colon is linked to an artificial opening so that he can effectively pass stool, his treatment is not complete. ARM still causes vomiting, pain, bloating, and malnutrition, and there is a stigma surrounding it. “Rabira has suffered from social stigma and colostomy complications,” AMHF reports.

“[Rabira’s parents] do not have any money to cover any amount of the bills that Rabira’s treatment will generate. That is why he has endured all these years without receiving treatment.” AMHF continues, “[They] are very eager to send him to school once he is cured.”

This will be possible for $1,500, with which a new anal opening will be created. According to AMHF, “Rabira will undergo a PSARP (the next step following a colostomy) and then two to three months from now he will undergo the final stage of the surgery (colostomy closure).”

After surgery, “Rabira will be able to pass stool normally. He will have a chance to attend school, work towards his dreams, and will no longer be under social stigma,” AMHF shares.

Furthermore, the discomfort caused by this condition will decrease dramatically, further improving Rabira’s quality of life.

“Rabira wants to be a ball player but he has a very hard time playing with his peers because of the colostomy. He hopes to be able to play and go to school once he is well,” AMHF tells us.

Meet Rabira, an eight-year-old son of peasant farmers from Ethiopia. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), expl...

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Rabira's Timeline

  • August 19, 2015
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Rabira was submitted by Beatrice Njoroge, Curative Medical Support Program Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • August 21, 2015
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Rabira was scheduled to receive treatment. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • September 1, 2015
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Rabira's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 4, 2015
    FUNDING ENDED

    Rabira is no longer raising funds.

  • November 4, 2015
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Rabira's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

Funded by 40 donors

Funded by 40 donors

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.