biran ceesay
biran's Story

biran joined Watsi on August 17th, 2013. 23 other people also joined Watsi on that day! biran's most recent donation supported Tusingire, a small-scale farmer from Uganda, to fund uterine prolapse repair surgery.

Impact

biran has funded healthcare for 25 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by biran

"We would like to ask for help for the treatment of our son. We are greatly concerned for his future," share the parents of 14-month-old Archiel. Archiel lives with his family in the Philippines, and has been diagnosed with unilateral clubfoot. "Archiel cannot walk, he is only capable of rolling from left to right," shares our medical partner, International Care Ministries (ICM). "His mother observed that he has poor locomotive and speech development. This makes it hard for them to address his needs and keep him safe. One parent has to stay in the house and watch him all the time and that prevents his parents to work and sustain their family's needs." "Archiel gives his parents so much joy," ICM continues. "Though he cannot speak or walk, he manages to give happiness to his family by smiling and giggling when he is happy. Those simple moments are greatly cherished by the family. His parents are working together to supply for the needs of the family, but still, their income is not even enough for the needs of the children. That is why it is very hard for them to provide for his treatment." For $1,500, Archiel will receive treatment and surgery to correct his clubfoot. After surgery, "Archiel will be more comfortable in facing challenges in learning and development. As part of him is being treated, this can pave the way that other conditions can also be addressed. This surgery will also increase the quality of life of their family as it address the emotional needs, physical needs, and economic needs that is attached to his condition. With the surgery, he can now also start learning and developing his locomotive skills which will also hasten all other learning stages he has to face in his age," ICM adds. "We have been praying that our time to work for our family will be more than what we can do now," Archiel's parents add, "So the future of our children will be brighter. We also would like our life to become a testimony that God truly touches lives and hearts to help the poor like us. We would like to see Archiel grow, walk, go to school and fulfill whatever dream he has."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Meet Rabira, an eight-year-old son of peasant farmers from Ethiopia. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), explains: “Rabira was born with a condition called ‘imperforated anus.’ For the last eight years he has lived with a colostomy that enables him to pass stool.” Also known as anorectal malformation (ARM), Rabira’s condition involves a blockage of stool flow and/or an incorrect alignment of the anus and rectum. Although Rabira has a colostomy, meaning that his colon is linked to an artificial opening so that he can effectively pass stool, his treatment is not complete. ARM still causes vomiting, pain, bloating, and malnutrition, and there is a stigma surrounding it. “Rabira has suffered from social stigma and colostomy complications,” AMHF reports. “[Rabira’s parents] do not have any money to cover any amount of the bills that Rabira's treatment will generate. That is why he has endured all these years without receiving treatment.” AMHF continues, “[They] are very eager to send him to school once he is cured.” This will be possible for $1,500, with which a new anal opening will be created. According to AMHF, “Rabira will undergo a PSARP (the next step following a colostomy) and then two to three months from now he will undergo the final stage of the surgery (colostomy closure).” After surgery, “Rabira will be able to pass stool normally. He will have a chance to attend school, work towards his dreams, and will no longer be under social stigma," AMHF shares. Furthermore, the discomfort caused by this condition will decrease dramatically, further improving Rabira’s quality of life. “Rabira wants to be a ball player but he has a very hard time playing with his peers because of the colostomy. He hopes to be able to play and go to school once he is well,” AMHF tells us.

$1,500raised
Fully funded