Satu MuiluMONTHLY DONOR
Satu's Story

Satu joined Watsi on July 19th, 2015. Six years ago, Satu joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Satu's most recent donation supported Ericka, a baby girl from Guatemala, to treat and manage a rare genetic disorder.

Impact

Satu has funded healthcare for 11 patients in 5 countries.

All patients funded by Satu

Angelica is a newborn baby girl from rural Guatemala. She was born one month prematurely. She was small and weak when she was born, and acquired an infection in her eyes and now her lungs. When she came to see us at the clinic, she was very sick, but now she is doing much better after receiving hospital care. Unfortunately, her mother had to receive antibiotics that are unsafe for breastfeeding. Since her mother had to stop breastfeeding while taking the medications, she lost her ability to make milk and now Angelica is acutely malnourished. Her mother says her heart breaks because she is unable to give her daughter enough milk to make her stop crying. Angelica lives with her parents and her older siblings in a humble one-room wood house with a tin roof. Her mother is worried because she can see her daughter losing weight, and she does not have enough milk to feed her. Since she spends so much time caring for Angelica and her father works as a day laborer in the coffee fields, barely making enough money to support basic living costs, they cannot afford the extremely expensive formula Angelica needs to survive. Although Angelica's life is in danger now, the treatment she needs to be a healthy and happy baby is simple. She will receive formula with the protein, calories, and nutrients she needs to grow and develop. Her immune system will grow stronger with the formula, and she will no longer cry from hunger. This treatment will not only save Angelica's life, but will mean she is no longer at risk for seizures, diarrhea, and long-term developmental delays due to her lack of milk. "My desire is that my daughter gets better and can grow healthily," her mother said. "I want to see her get big so that she can go to the school and study and be a person like you all that helps the people that need it."

$1,016raised
Fully funded

San is a 53-year-old woman from Burma who lives with her son and older brother. When she was 34 years old, working as maid in Bangkok, San began noticing her fatigue, inability to carry heavy loads, swelling of her face and joints, back pain, and shortness of breath. She frequently vomited and gasped for breath. Our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP) shares, “San went to a hospital in Bangkok, and the doctor diagnosed her with rheumatic heart disease (RHD).” After the diagnosis, San’s symptoms forced her to quit her job. Her other children, living abroad in Malaysia and Australia, send enough money home to cover daily living expenses. RHD is a chronic heart condition arising from complications with rheumatic fever, especially common in developing countries. This can lead to rheumatic mitral stenosis, which causes a heart valve to malfunction, decreasing blood flow to the rest of the body. The upper heart chamber swells as pressure builds, and blood and fluid collect in the lung tissue, making it difficult to breathe. San was diagnosed with rheumatic mitral stenosis. Now, she suffers from numbness in her back, lack of appetite, heart palpitations, and shortness of breath. $1500 will cover the cost of her surgery. BBP, explains, “Following the surgery, San should be able to work again. She should be able to not suffer from fatigue, numbness, or shortness of breath.” San shares, “I enjoy my work as a maid or seamstress, and if I can regain my health, I want to go back and work in Bangkok again.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

This is Mary Gold, a 39-year-old woman who lives in the Philippines. Mary Gold has an angiomyolipoma, a common variety of benign tumor, in her right kidney. “Mary Gold is experiencing a tingling pain in her right flank area, which she rated an eight out of ten on the pain scale. Furthermore, she has a mass that has been growing for the past seven months,” explains our medical partner, International Care Ministries (ICM). Although this type of tumor is benign, it can impair kidney functionality or even lead to the dilation and eventual rupture of blood vessels in the area. ICM reports, “Mary Gold’s daily activities are limited because of her condition. With an enlarged abdomen, it is uncomfortable for her to move around and perform necessary activities such as household chores, laundry, and fetching water.” For $1,395, we can fund surgery to remove Mary Gold’s right kidney. “With treatment, she will be freed from the pain her tumor brings and from the increasing possibility of bleeding," ICM says. ICM describes Mary Gold as “responsible and patient in taking care of her family.” They continue that she “really wants peace with everyone. Whenever her husband gets angry, she always walks out of the room so as to avoid arguments. Whenever she has nothing else to do, she usually entertains herself by watching TV shows.” “I really want to be well. Though there is a strong feeling of fear, I am trying to stay strong. I am excited to be well and take care of my family without out pain,” Mary Gold explains.

$1,395raised
Fully funded

Meet Rabira, an eight-year-old son of peasant farmers from Ethiopia. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), explains: “Rabira was born with a condition called ‘imperforated anus.’ For the last eight years he has lived with a colostomy that enables him to pass stool.” Also known as anorectal malformation (ARM), Rabira’s condition involves a blockage of stool flow and/or an incorrect alignment of the anus and rectum. Although Rabira has a colostomy, meaning that his colon is linked to an artificial opening so that he can effectively pass stool, his treatment is not complete. ARM still causes vomiting, pain, bloating, and malnutrition, and there is a stigma surrounding it. “Rabira has suffered from social stigma and colostomy complications,” AMHF reports. “[Rabira’s parents] do not have any money to cover any amount of the bills that Rabira's treatment will generate. That is why he has endured all these years without receiving treatment.” AMHF continues, “[They] are very eager to send him to school once he is cured.” This will be possible for $1,500, with which a new anal opening will be created. According to AMHF, “Rabira will undergo a PSARP (the next step following a colostomy) and then two to three months from now he will undergo the final stage of the surgery (colostomy closure).” After surgery, “Rabira will be able to pass stool normally. He will have a chance to attend school, work towards his dreams, and will no longer be under social stigma," AMHF shares. Furthermore, the discomfort caused by this condition will decrease dramatically, further improving Rabira’s quality of life. “Rabira wants to be a ball player but he has a very hard time playing with his peers because of the colostomy. He hopes to be able to play and go to school once he is well,” AMHF tells us.

$1,500raised
Fully funded

“Two years ago, Paw May began to feel pain in her abdomen,” shares our medical partner, Burma Border Projects (BBP). The pain was initially treated with medicine, but returned two months ago. After traveling to Thailand to find healthcare, 50-year-old Paw May was found to have kidney stones. Kidney stones form when a change occurs in the normal balance of salts and minerals found in the urine. When these stones attempt to pass through the body, they can cause a great deal of pain, fever and chills. BBP explains, “Paw May is no longer able to carry on with her daily household work.” As a mother to three children—two of whom are still in high school—Paw May works hard to take care of her family. According to BBP, “Her son and husband both cultivate rice and grow vegetables to eat. Paw May and her family live hand-to-mouth and are very self-sufficient.” Though this self-sufficient lifestyle supports the family most of the time, Paw May and her husband often have to borrow money and are looking for Watsi support to help out with treatment. $1,500 will fund the treatment Paw May needs to treat her condition. She will undergo a surgical procedure to remove her kidney stones, and receive transportation to and from the hospital. The funding also covers post-operative care and medication. With this treatment, Paw May will no longer run the risk of infection and increased discomfort, as surgical intervention will impede the growth of the kidney stones and prevent future problems. BBP tells us, “After surgery Paw May will be able to return home, where she will be able to return to her domestic chores and help her children.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded