Brennan ZelenerMONTHLY DONOR
Brennan's Story

Brennan joined Watsi on September 13th, 2013. Seven years ago, Brennan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Brennan's most recent donation traveled 9,000 miles to support Lesina, a loving and hardworking mom from Malawi, to fund treatment for uterine fibroids.

Impact

Brennan has funded healthcare for 87 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Brennan

Lesina is a married mother of two. Her firstborn was born in 1995 and has special needs that require a lot of support from Lesina. Lesina likes spending a lot of time with her and ensures her safety all the time. Her other child is 13 and is a 5th grade student. Lesina sells tomatoes at a nearby market while her husband is a driver. They own a three-bedroom iron sheet-roofed house for shelter. She also raises some local chickens with free-range farming, but shared that most of them were stolen. Currently, her family has no land where they can do farming and usually has to buy food from the market. Lesina was well until 2019 when she started having a lot of abdominal pains and other symptoms. She went to a clinic and was given medication which helped for while. But, her condition kept recurring. In 2020, she started feeling a hard mass on the left side of her abdomen and when she came to the hospital again the clinician ordered a cancer screening for her. During the procedure, the nurse felt a mass that is suggestive of uterine fibroids. She was referred to a gynecologist who after scanning and examination confirmed the diagnosis of uterine fibroids and ordered surgical intervention of a procedure called total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) which is the full removal of the uterus. Fibroids are abnormal growths that develop in or on a woman's uterus. Sometimes these growths become quite large and cause severe abdominal pain and heavy bleeding. If left untreated, fibroids can continue to grow, both in size and number and the symptoms will become worse. The fibroids' pain may increase and the heavy bleeding may become worse leading to anemia which may be fatal. After the surgery, it is expected that Lesina will stop having abdominal pains and heavy bleedings and will lead a full, healthy life. She is scheduled for surgery on January 3rd and is appealing for financial support. Lesina says, “I have heard that some uterine fibroids can burst and cause serious problems, I don’t want that to happen to me. My handicapped firstborn needs me in sound health to continue caring for her. Kindly support my surgery.”

80%funded
$1,091raised
$272to go

Lydia is a small-scale farmer and mother of ten children. Her oldest child is now forty years old and her youngest is eighteen years old. Her husband stays at home, as his old age keeps him from engaging in income-generating work anymore. Her children can only provide minimal support, so Lydia engages in small-scale farming to provide for her family. About thirty years ago, Lydia began to experience troubling symptoms, including swelling on her neck that was initially small and painless but has rapidly increased in size. Due to limited income, she has not been able to seek treatment before. However, Lydia recently visited our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), for another health condition and shared more about her situation with the doctors. She shared that she experiences airway obstructions and has difficulty sleeping. Additionally, she experiences pain in her eyes and ears that affects her hearing and ability to light a fire in the kitchen which is needed for cooking. Upon review, doctors diagnosed her condition as a non-toxic goiter, and thyroidectomy surgery iss recommended to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. On October 5th, Lydia will undergo a thyroidectomy at AMH's care center to remove all or part of her thyroid gland. AMH is requesting $333 to fund this procedure. Lydia shared, “I have been for the majority of my life covering my neck whenever I go to the public because of the huge neck swelling and feeling uncomfortable. I pray that I may look normal again through surgery. I hope to comfortably continue with farming once I am stable.”

$333raised
Fully funded

Naw Dah is a 40-year-old woman who lives with her husband, four daughters and three sons in a refugee camp in Northern Thailand. Six of her children attend school in the camp, while Naw Dah looks after her youngest daughter at home. Due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, her husband has had difficulty finding work outside of the camp for the past few months. The family survives on money they receive through a food card each month from an organization called The Border Consortium. Since 2016, Naw Dah has suffered from frequent, painful urinary tract infections. After she received an x-ray at a local hospital in April 2020, she was referred for further treatment and diagnosed with kidney stones. She received treatment in September 2020, but at follow-up appointments, the doctor told her that she still had fragments of the kidney stone, and she returned for multiple x-rays and oral medications. During her most recent follow-up in August 2021, the doctor told her that the stones are now 6mm in size and scheduled her for another ureteroscopy. She is unable to pay for surgery and was referred our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for assistance accessing treatment. On September 3rd, she will undergo a ureteroscopy and now, she needs help raising $1,500 to fund her procedure and care. Naw Dah shared, "I am a bit scared as I already underwent treatment twice, but I really want to get better. So I put my trust in God and I will go through this pain again so that I will be free from this pain in the future."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Kishimwi is a playful and friendly young boy who is currently having a hard time walking. Kishimwi has a younger sibling, and his parents are small-scale maize and vegetable farmers who grow food for their family. His father also works as a hawker selling Maasai beads, belts and sandals in order to make extra income. Kishimwi was diagnosed with genu valgus, causing his legs to bend inward to form knock knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. Kishimwi's parents noticed a slight bent in his leg when he was three years old, but became alarmed when the problem worsened over the past year to the point where walking became difficult. Kishimwi experiences pain when participating in daily activities, so his parents decided to seek treatment for him at a local hospital in their village. The family was advised to give Kishimwi foods containing high calcium and calcium supplements to strengthen his bones and prevent his legs from bending further. However, the effects were negligible and Kishimwi's legs became more bent. Fortunately, an older patient's parent told the family about Watsi's medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC), and the family traveled to the hospital hoping for treatment. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Kishimwi. The procedure will take place on June 29th. Treatment will hopefully restore Kishimwi's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Kishimwi’s father hopes his son's pain will be alleviated after this care, "We have used medication and foods containing high calcium but none has helped. Please help treat my son because as you can see his legs are badly affected."

$880raised
Fully funded

Joseph is a 59-year-old who relocated from his homeland to Kenya, where he has been for over 20 years. Joseph is a father to one child. His wife left their family many years ago. Currently, Joseph works as a day laborer and is especially well known for his tree cutting skills. He and his son stay with a family on their farm, where he often works. Several days ago, Joseph experienced an extremely painful accident. He fell from a tree when he was cutting tree branches. As a result, Joseph sustained multiple severe injuries, including multiple left rib fractures with a pneumothorax, and a closed intertrochanteric femur fracture on his right leg. He was rushed to our medical partner's care center Kapsowar Hospital, where he received emergency care and a chest tube was inserted to drain fluids surrounding his lungs caused by the impact of the incident. Since his admission, his condition has improved. Joseph was also put on traction to restore and maintain straight alignment and length of the fractured bone. Joseph is still bedridden and in pain, and is not able to walk and work. Despite this, he is optimistic that he will recover soon with proper treatment. Joseph requires funding for the fixation of his fracture to facilitate a full recovery. He is unable to raise any amount for his surgery, and appeals for financial support. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On April 27th, Joseph will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will help Joseph recover from his pain and restore his mobility, allowing him to return to walking and working. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1,016 to fund his procedure. Joseph shared, “My hope is to be healed and be on my feet again so that I can continue with my daily duties."

$1,016raised
Fully funded

Than is a 42-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her husband, three daughters, three sons, son-in-law and granddaughter. Than and her family moved from Burma to Thailand ten years ago in search of better job opportunities. Her husband, her oldest daughter, one son, and her son-in-law work as day labourers on their employer’s farm, growing and harvesting tapioca, corn, and cabbage. Her two other sons go to school, while her youngest daughter and her granddaughter are too young to go to school. Than and her second oldest daughter are homemakers. On November 7th, 2020, Than discovered that she had an incisional hernia. Currently, Than experiences abdominal pain throughout the week and has to take pain medication to decrease her pain. She feels uncomfortable when she sits, and when she is in pain, she has to walk or lie down for the pain to ease. Fortunately, on January 28th, she will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Than's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 28th and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably and go about her daily activities normally. Than shared, “I was so happy when I learned that I was to go to Mae Tao Clinic [and later Mae Sot Hospital] for treatment. My children are also happy that I will receive treatment with help from donors.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded