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Success! Tin from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund life-changing eye surgery to prevent further vision loss.

Tin
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Tin's treatment was fully funded on January 19, 2023.
August 16, 2022

Tin is a 45-year-old man. Originally from Burma, he fled to Thailand over 20 years ago due to civil war. He currently lives with his wife, who works as a street vendor selling various snacks and vegetable, and one of his daughters, who is currently in school. His family also raises chickens, which they sell when they need cash. Tin previously worked as a farmer and a construction worker, but he has recently been unable to work due to his condition. In the future, he hopes to go back to work and help support his family.

After an incident that occurred this past April that caused him to be hit in the left eye by a mango, Tin lost his vision in that eye and began to experience headaches, swelling, severe eye pain, and dizziness when attempting to stand.

Tin eventually sought medical attention at a clinic. There, a medic checked his left eye, gave him a bottle of eye drops, and told him to seek treatment at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) since they could not treat him there. However, he did not go to MTC right away due to financial constraints. He instead hoped that his eye would recover over time with the help of eye drops. Although his pain was temporarily reduced, the bruising disappeared, and the swelling went down over time, he never regained his vision.

The pain in his eye eventually returned, and he noticed that he had a white spot on his left pupil. As the white spot increased in size, his eye progressively became more painful and began to itch. He now experiences discharge and watering in his eye, as well as difficulty sleeping.

At the beginning of this month, a small lump appeared near the white spot on his left pupil. The lump gradually increased in size until it bursted on August 13th. After the discharge and bleeding from the lump stopped, he asked his friend to take him to MTC right away. When he arrived at the clinic, he was told to come back on Monday since there were not any eye specialist medics working on the weekend.

When Tin returned on Monday, a medic examined his left eye, and he was diagnosed with corneal perforation, a condition resulting from the cornea being penetrated and damaged. Tin was also told that his eye is infected. He now must undergo surgery at our medical partner’s care center, Mae Sot General Hospital, to remove his left eye as quickly as possible before the infection spreads to his right eye.

Fortunately, Tin was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for financial assistance accessing treatment. On August 17th, surgeons at our medical partner’s care center will perform an enucleation to remove his left eye. Now, BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Tin’s life-changing procedure.

Tin shares, “I feel very depressed and worried about my eye. I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I lost vision in both of my eyes. I want to receive surgery quickly to prevent my right eye from becoming infected. Without your help, I don’t think I would be able to receive further treatment. Therefore, I want to say thank you to the donors and the organization for agreeing to support my treatment costs.”

Tin is a 45-year-old man. Originally from Burma, he fled to Thailand over 20 years ago due to civil war. He currently lives with his wife, w...

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Tin's Timeline

  • August 16, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Tin was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • August 17, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Tin was scheduled to receive treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 18, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Tin's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 19, 2023
    FULLY FUNDED

    Tin's treatment was fully funded.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Tin's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

Funded by 34 donors

Funded by 34 donors

Treatment
Enucleation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $3,058 for Tin's treatment
Subsidies fund $1,558 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,270
Medical Staff
$393
Medication
$17
Supplies
$400
Labs
$86
Radiology
$550
Other
$342
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience blurred or dim vision, shadows or blind spots in the field of vision, sensitivity to light and glare, double vision, eye pain, headache, nausea, and vomiting.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

In the case of an eye tumor, the patient is at risk of the cancer spreading.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The healthcare system in Burma does not permit the average citizen to receive proper eye examinations. This lack of attention to ocular health is due to a variety of reasons. However, a low optometrist-to-population ratio and insufficient funds are the leading causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery will only be performed if the pressure in the eye is stable. The time it takes to stabilize the pressure in the eye depends on the severity of damage to the eye.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of a malignant tumor, removing the eye will actually reduce pain for the patient.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, scarring, persistent swelling, wound separation, and the need to undergo additional surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Burma has 309 ophthalmologists and 150 eye nurses. Fewer than half of the ophthalmologists perform surgery, and almost two-thirds confine their practice to the cities of Yangon (with a population of about six million) and Mandalay (about three million), where many people have the financial capacity to meet high out-of-pocket healthcare expenses. Aside from these main facilities, there is roughly one ophthalmologist for every 500,000 people, and eye health screening and treatment for children and adults is neither comprehensive nor consistent.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Son

Son is a 21-year-old mother of two. She and her husband have two sons - one is four years old and the other is one year old. Both she and her husband are construction workers. When not working outside on construction sites, she is a busy mother caring and cooking for her active children. Four months ago, on the way home from work, Son was in a motor vehicle collision. She injured her left shoulder and received a hard blow to the face, fracturing her left orbital bones. Her family took her to a government hospital to repair the bones surrounding her eye. The traumatic injury also damaged the muscle and nerve function of her shoulder, which was not repaired. This is a devastating injury for their young family, as it can cause a significant loss of function and ability to perform tasks of daily living. Son has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on her left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. She has pain and is unable to lift her left arm. She cannot work in construction or manage her household, which has also been very hard for her husband. Son traveled to our medical partner's care center to receive treatment. This is the only center in the whole country where this treatment is available. On October 17th, she will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, she hopes that her arm will be functional and she can work, do housework, and care for her children. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, is requesting $709 to fund this procedure. She says: "After surgery, I hope I can use my left arm. This treatment will help me in the future to return to work."

73% funded

73%funded
$519raised
$190to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.