chirag khanijauMONTHLY DONOR
chirag's Story

chirag joined Watsi on October 9th, 2014. Five years ago, chirag joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. chirag's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Beatrice, a farmer and market vendor from Kenya, to fund a fracture repair surgery.

Impact

chirag has funded healthcare for 66 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by chirag

Beatrice is a quiet lady in her early 50’s who has been blessed with six children, now ages 14-27. She runs a small grocery at the marketplace to provide for her family. Beatrice's husband doesn’t have a stable job. He does casual jobs across the village such as clearing bushes to meet the needs of his family. Beatrice and her family live in a two-bedroom house constructed with mud. They depend mostly on their daily jobs for food and save a little to pay school fees for their children and bills at the end of the month. A week ago, Beatrice sustained a left arm injury after fainting. Beatrice was brought to Kapsowar Hospital and an X-Ray was done which confirmed a fracture to her left humerus. Beatrice shared that she has a history of fainting and subsequently falling. Beatrice is in pain and she is unable to attend to her normal day-to-day things now. Beatrice is concerned that she can’t cook for her family or run her grocery business due to her injury. Beatrice had a cast applied about a week ago and was discharged to go home to look for funds for her surgery. A week later, Beatrice returned to the hospital with no hope of raising funds for her surgery. Their family is unable to raise the required amount with their low wages only able to afford daily needs like meals and clothing. Fortunately, our medical partner can help. On September 7th, Beatrice will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation procedure. Beatrice will no longer be in pain, she will be able to attend to her grocery business and take care of her family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $941 to fund this procedure. Beatrice says, “Life has never been the same since I broke my hand. I am worried about my children who need care every day. My hope is to get treated so that I can continue supporting my family.”

81%funded
$767raised
$174to go

Rhophence is struggling to speak when we meet her. She cannot pronounce words clearly or eat regularly due to a mandibular mass. She was diagnosed with Mandibular Fibrous Dysplasia, which is also causing her teeth to loosen on the affected area. She is scheduled for a 10-hour surgery at our Medical Partner's Care Center Kijabe Hospital. Her chronic mandibular swelling started back in October 2020 as a small swelling and has gradually increased in size, so Rhophence was forced to visit the hospital. She was treated for pain in their local health centre and discharged home. But, the swelling worsened and Rhophence opted to visit Kijabe in May 2021. Several tests revealed the Mandibular Fibrous Dysplasia diagnosis and surgery was recommended. She does not have the funds for the various procedures to relieve her pain. She is a single mother of four children aged between 30 and 18 years. She comes from a remote village along the Kenyan coast. She is currently jobless with no source of income and stays with her younger brother who she depends on for survival. The surgery is estimated to cost about $4,500. She has active national health insurance coverage that has only approved $2,000. She is unable to raise the remaining amount. She fundraised money for travel fare to come to Kijabe and she is now being hosted in the local centre by a relative. Rhophence shared, "This swelling is so painful. My mouth is deformed and I cannot even speak clearly. It’s sadly starting to give a bad odour making people close to me uncomfortable. This is affecting my life. I need these surgeries to normalize my life.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Chaw is a 35-year-old woman who lives with her husband and two children in Burma. Her husband is a fisherman, who earns 10,000 kyat (approx. 10 USD) per day selling his catch at the market. However, she shared that since the coup d'état in February, he cannot work because he is afraid of being taken away. Her husband has tried to find other work, but nobody wants to hire him because they also have the same problem. About a year ago, Chaw was diagnosed with diabetes. She could not always afford to pay for medication, and only able to purchase it occasionally. One day, while she was doing household chores, she accidentally injured her left foot with a knife. The wound worsened, until she sought treatment at a local clinic, where it was recommended that she seek treatment at a hospital. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) is helping Chaw to receive treatment. Chaw visited BCMF's care center where a doctor examined her foot. While examining her, the doctor diagnosed her with a diabetes-related cellulitis ulcer and recommended surgery. Currently, the skin around Chaw's ulcer is red, she has a fever and experiences severe pain in her left foot, especially at night. On May 11th, she will undergo a wound debridement procedure, and now she needs help to fund the $694 procedure. Chaw shared, "our family has low income during these difficult times and we cannot pay for treatment. Our two children are staying with their grandmother because my husband has to take care of me while I am admitted at the hospital."

$694raised
Fully funded

Thomas is a very charming, playful, and friendly 6-year-old. He's the second-born in a family of four children. His parents say he has been requesting for them to send him to school like his older brother, but they have not been able to enroll him in kindergarten due to his health condition. Both of his parents are small-scale farmers of maize and vegetables, which they use mainly for their food and only sell some of their harvest to be able to buy other basics. Thomas was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. This condition started when Thomas was three years old, and over time his legs have worsened. His legs have curved inwards, forming knock knees. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Thomas now walks with a gait and has pain after a long day of play and walking. Thomas' parents initially wanted to seek treatment for him, but the village health clinic was not able to treat the condition and advised them to go to a referral hospital. This posed some financial challenges. Fortunately, through a community outreach program of Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center called Plaster House, Thomas was able to be sent to ALMC Hospital, traveling over twelve hours from their village. Thomas has been scheduled to have both of his legs corrected through surgery, but his parents cannot afford the cost of his care and are in need of financial support. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Thomas. The procedure is scheduled to take place on April 20th. Treatment will hopefully restore Thomas's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Thomas’ father shared, "We wish to see our son walk well like other normal children, but due to financial challenges we have not been able to afford his treatment cost. Please help us."

$880raised
Fully funded

Di is a 40-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her parents, her husband, her brother, and her two children in Mae La Refugee Camp in Tak Province. Di and her family work hard to make ends meet. Her family runs a small shop selling kitchen utensils. Di's husband is a religious teacher, and he does not earn regular income. Her brother is unemployed, and her parents are retired. Di helps with the family shop while her daughter goes to the community school that is led by volunteers. Her youngest son is too young to go to school. She shared that their family income is enough for family expenses, but they are not able to save any money. Around two years ago, Di was diagnosed with an umbilical hernia. Currently, she experiences pain under her chest and her abdominal around umbilical is swollen and pain. Di is not able to do any household chores because of her condition. The pain worsens after she has meals or constipation, and her stomach will feel as hard as a stone. Fortunately, on January 19th, Di will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Di's hernia repair surgery. Once completed, the procedure will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably and be well enough to care for her family. Di shared, “Once I am better, I will try my best to take care of my family and my children's education. I want them to study in Thai school. They need to be educated, so I need to be healthy."

$1,500raised
Fully funded