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Solomon Kabetemere

MONTHLY DONOR

Solomon's Story

Solomon joined Watsi on November 29th, 2017. Six months ago, Solomon joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Solomon's most recent donation supported Charity, a mother from Kenya, to fund a gallbladder removal surgery.

Impact

Solomon has funded healthcare for 8 patients in 4 countries.

All patients funded by Solomon

Charity

Charity is a 28-year-old woman from Kenya. She is the eldest in her family and is now married and has a newborn baby who is two months old. Her husband works as a clerk at a local dairy factory, where he earns enough to feed their family. Charity was working at the same factory, but was laid off from her job due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She is not currently working and spends her time at home taking care of her child. Since August 2020, when Charity was pregnant, she started experiencing pain in her upper abdomen that radiated to the back. Charity had visited several different health centers but showed no improvement, and later decided to come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Nazareth Hospital. She underwent a scan, which showed that she has a large gallstone. The doctor recommended that she undergo a cholecystectomy. Without treatment, Charity's condition may become more complicated and cause her gall bladder inflammation, or a blocked bile duct or pancreatic duct. However, Charity is unable to meet the cost of her care and appeals for financial support. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare. is helping Charity receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a cholecystectomy on March 9th at our medical partner's care center. Surgeons will remove the gallbladder due to the gallstone causing pain and possibly infection. This procedure will cost $788, and she and her family need help raising money. Charity shared, "The pain is too much at times and I feel some relief when I vomit. I am hoping to get support so that I can be well and be at peace to nurse my baby."

61% funded

61%funded
$482raised
$306to go
Salmani

Salmani is a six-month-old baby from Tanzania and the second born in his family. His parents live in Arusha where they are both subsistence farmers. Salmani was born healthy, but at the age of three months, Salmani’s mother observed that his head size looked abnormal. His neck was not as strong as a 3-month-old, and she felt his other body parts were somewhat weak. As a result of his condition, Salmani has been experiencing an increasing head circumference and inability to sit on his own. His mother took him to Mount Meru Hospital and they referred their family to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC Hospital for treatment. She decided she had to wait to go because they could not afford to proceed with Salmani's treatment, doctor’s visits, or the tests required. Later on, they heard about Watsi's ALMC-The Plaster House program and how children with disabilities are able to be supported. Salmani's parents wish to see him be able to sit, walk one day, and also to see his head size return back to normal. Salmani has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Without treatment, Salmani will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Salmani that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 14th and will drain the excess fluid from Salmani's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Salmani will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Salmani’s mother shared, “Please help my son get this treatment so that we can save his life and he can be able to play like other children.”

100% funded

$1,300raised
Fully funded
Peter

Peter is a 46-year-old man from Kiambu County in Kenya. He works mostly in construction sites as a manual laborer. Peter is the second born in a family of eight. He was hit by a motorbike while crossing the road on July 27th, 2020. He was taken to a nearby hospital where an x-ray confirmed he had sustained a fracture of his left femur. An ORIF surgery was recommended but he could not afford the cost of surgery. Peter had been on traction to help treat his fracture since his admission at a government hospital. A recent standoff between the county government and health workers led to a go-slow, which has prompted patients like Peter to seek treatment elsewhere since they cannot access care currently. Peter came to our medical partner's facility and saw the surgeon who again also recommended an ORIF procedure. Peter hopes that he finally has the life-changing surgery that will restore full functionality of his leg and enable him to go back to work. If not treated Peter’s fracture may fail to unite or mal-unite leading to loss of function of his left lower limb. He is not able to personally raise the amount required for surgery given that he is a casual laborer with minimal income.  Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On October 19th, Peter will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will allow him to walk with ease and reduce the instance of complications. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. “I have been in hospital and unable to provide for myself since the accident in July. I hope that the operation will enable me to walk again so that I can fend for myself once more,” Peter said.

100% funded

$1,049raised
Fully funded
Virginia

Virginia is a five-month-old baby girl living in rural Guatemala. She was born to a single mother who stays home to care for her. Unfortunately, Virginia's mother cannot produce breast milk, which has made it difficult for Virginia to receive the nourishment that she needs in her early months of life. Because of this, Virginia was recently diagnosed with malnutrition, a condition that occurs from consuming too little protein, calories, and nutrients. In the short term, malnutrition means Virginia has little energy to grow, and that her immune system is weak, leaving her vulnerable to diseases that could further compromise her growth. If left untreated, she may also face the long-term consequences of malnutrition, such as increased risk of chronic illness and a lowered IQ. Concerned for her well-being, her mother took Virginia to our medical partner, Wuqu' Kawoq, for treatment. Beginning June 13, Virginia will receive micronutrients, formula, and food supplementation, as well as regular growth monitoring. Community health workers will also teach her mother how to create a nutrient rich diet using limited resources. The $1,162 requested will cover all expenses of her continued treatment, allowing her to gain weight, strengthen her immune system, and catch up with other children her age. Virginia’s mother says, “I am scared because I do not have breast milk to give my daughter, and we are of scarce resources so I cannot afford to buy her much. I dream to see my daughter grow up well so that she can study and in the future become a teacher.”

100% funded

$1,162raised
Fully funded