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Adrian Valc

MONTHLY DONOR

Adrian's Story

Adrian joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Four years ago, Adrian joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Adrian's most recent donation supported Lib, a grandmother from Cambodia, to fund vision-restoring eye surgery.

Impact

Adrian has funded healthcare for 54 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Adrian

Agnes

Agnes, a mother of eight children, arrived in our Watsi reps' office looking frail, drained, and in deep thought. She had given up getting medical attention and had requested her children to take her home before we intervened. She is mourning her husband who recently succumbed to cancer. Furthermore, doctors recently discovered she has a high-grade stromal tumor and requires surgery to remove the ovarian mass, which has been causing her severe discomfort. She shared her story with us: during the first week of May 2020, Agnes started feeling a sharp pain in the lower part of her stomach. She thought they were just normal pains and therefore got pain medication from a nearby chemist. Days later, her pains continued to increase, this time accompanied by bleeding. Alarmed she visited the nearest health centre where she was referred to Kijabe Hospital for further review. Several tests were conducted when she visited the facility and doctors discovered that she has symptomatic uterine fibroids. She underwent surgery but later doctors discovered that she has a mass in her ovaries that requires excursion. Despite having approval from the National Health Insurance program, the amount is not enough to cover the cost of surgery and she needs financial assistance. Agnes was widowed barely a month ago after her husband's long battle to cancer. The cost of taking care of her husband has depleted the limited family resources they had. Equally, she has also been sick and had several trips that made her close the little shop they were running from their home. She has no source of income after they closed down their shop. Her kids don’t yet have a stable source of income, and with what they do have, they have been instrumental in paying for her husband’s medical bills and cost of the funeral. Agnes shared, “I recently buried my husband as a result of cancer. I have been ailing and in a lot of pain. I had to close my small shop and therefore have no source of income. I am unable to afford this much-needed surgery and request for assistance.”

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$616raised
Fully funded
Khin

Khin is a 25-year-old man from Thailand. He lives with his wife and his friend in Mae Pa Village in the north of the country. Khin and his wife moved from Burma searching for better job opportunities. His wife works in a factory as a seamstress. Khin used to work as a day laborer but since his accident he has not been able to work. His friend works as an agricultural day laborer but he does not share his income with Khin and his wife. In his free time, Khin loved to play caneball with his friends and listen to music. Khin currently has a colostomy and shared that he does not like having one. He feels embarrassed and he avoids his friends. He worries what his friends will think so he always stays at home since he received the colostomy. Aside from his symptoms, he feels sad that he cannot work and that he has to depend on his wife’s income. Furthermore, because of the COVID-19, the factory his wife works at has reduced their hours of operation. Khin underwent a colostomy, in which the end of the colon was brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for reversal. In Khin's case, his colostomy requires reversal in order to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the cost of a reverse colostomy for Khin. The surgery is scheduled to take place on August 10th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Khin said, “I feel sad that I cannot work and have to depend on my wife’s income. When I was admitted at the hospital my wife had to accompany me which also reduced the salary she received.”

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$1,500raised
Fully funded
Wai

Wai is a 14-year-old student from Thailand. He temporarily lives with his grandparents and great grandmother in Huay Ka Lote Village in Thailand, but Wai usually lives with his parents across the border in Burma. He came to visit his grandparents during his school break in mid-March 2020 after completing seventh grade, however, he was unable to return to his parents and home when Thailand closed it borders due to COVID-19. His parents are subsistence farmers and they also raise a few chickens, pigs, and goats to sustain their livelihood. When they need money to buy clothes or pay for healthcare, they sell some of their livestock. Meanwhile, his grandparents look after a landowner’s garden and land for 2,000 baht (approx. 67 USD) per month. The income that Wai’s grandparents earn from the landowner is just enough for their daily expenses. Wai is diagnosed with cataract and currently he has lost most of the vision in his right eye and is only able to see light. His right eye also looks red. Aside from that, he has no other symptoms and his eye does not hurt. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Wai. On June 16th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Wai's natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, he will be able to see clearly. Now, he needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. “I want to become a farmer when I grow up and follow in my parent’s footsteps, but I also want to become a nurse if I receive a chance to do so. I overheard my parents say that they don’t have enough money to continue supporting my studies once I graduate from grade eight, so I’m not so sure whether I’ll be able to continue my studies after next year,” said Wai.

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$1,500raised
Fully funded
Dina

Dina is a student from Tanzania. She is the sixth born in a family of eight children. She is currently in form one at school and her best subjects are mathematic and biology. She wishes to be a nurse in future. Dina is a very social person and very hard working both at home and school. She helps her mother with home chores and looking after her siblings. Her parents are small-scale farmers of maize, beans, and vegetables. Due to financial challenges her parents have not been able to seek treatment for her. Dina was involved in a fire accident when she was two years old. This accident has left her with contracture on her elbow and her right hand fingers have been left deformed. Dina was playing with her sibling and friends close to their home while her parents were out in their farm. There was a tree stump which had been put on fire so that the land could be used for house construction. It had past all week and most people knew the fire was out, since the fire had burned the stump leaving a big hole that went down a meter. As Dina was playing around the stump she got pushed by a friend and went head first in the stump hole. In the process of try to support herself, she landed with her right hand while her legs were left up the stump. At the bottom of the stump there was still fire burning, leading to her hand being burnt. By the time the neighbors heard her and ran to her rescue, she had sustained severe burns on her right hand. She is still not able to use her hand freely and this is affecting her studies. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Dina receive treatment. On September 30th, during her school break, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery so Dina will be able to use her hand freely again. Now, she needs help to fund this $608 procedure. Dina says, “My wrist is now released and I can move it, now I need to have my fingers released too. Please help me have my fingers treated so that I can be able to fully use my hand.”

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$608raised
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Adere

Adere is a nice thirteen year old boy who loves to go to school and study. He is in grade six and loves music. He spends his free time listening to country music and also loves to dance with his friends. His parents are farmers of teff and maize. But their harvest from their farm is very limited because of the hot and dry landscape. The population in the area is mostly supported by the government and NGOs for food and other basic needs. His parents have 12 children. Three of them are dependently living and the rest of the children are supported by their parents. Adere was born with congenital anomaly called Bladder Exstrophy. The child’s bladder is open to the air and not within the body. He leaks urine directly to his abdomen. As a result, he has bladder exposed to dirt which can cause infections and injury. Adere suffers from pain from irritation of the bladder, infection, and a bad smell from the continuous urinary leakage for the past years. In his classroom, he sits far from other students in the back alone. He mostly prefers to be alone, psychologically affected by the bad smell. His parents are always very worried and concerned because of his condition. They took him to a clinic in their area when he was a child, and the clinic told them this has to be treated in referral hospital. Their village is very rural that they couldn’t get to a hospital and the parents couldn’t bring him to the capital. Adere's brother said, “I believe he will have a normal life, free from any smell and psychological concerns.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded