Adrian's Story

Adrian joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Seven years ago, Adrian joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Adrian's most recent donation supported Alazar, a 4-year-old toddler from Ethiopia, to fund abdominal surgery.

Impact

Adrian has funded healthcare for 96 patients in 13 countries.

Patients funded by Adrian

Alazar is a sweet boy from Ethiopia. He is the seventh child in his family. Five of the children are girls and two are boys. He loves to sing songs, go to church, try martial arts, and drink juice. His dad is diabetic and his condition causes him to faint often. He has government health insurance and gets treatment in a local government hospital. Because of his condition, Alazar's dad cannot work. His mom makes traditional bread and sells it on the street to feed her children. She makes her bread by firewood and this makes it hard for her to always have the smoke of the wood making the bread. She is the only one who works for income in their family, but her older children help with housework. They bring water from the spring carrying it on their back. She proudly sends all her children to school. Alazar underwent an earlier colostomy, in which the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for closure. In Alazar's case, his colostomy requires closure in order to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,009 to cover the cost of a colostomy closure for Alazar. The surgery is scheduled to take place on January 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Alazar's mom said: “After he gets the treatment and heals I will praise my Lord. I will tell everyone who knows me about the hand of God. I did ask God ‘to heal my baby. You gave me this child; don’t take it away from me. I always cry and pray.’ I hope God has heard my prayer leading me to you. I will go to my church and testify what God did to all community in the church.”

$1,009raised
Fully funded

Srey Vin is a newly married 22-year-old and a mother of a four-month-old son. Her family lives some distance from Phnom Penh, where she and her husband both work in a garment factory that produces name-brand shoes and athletic wear. Srey Vin loves spending time with her baby and listening to the radio or watching music videos on YouTube. While she was pregnant, a large mass suddenly grew around Srey Vin's mandible, or jawbone. She went to a clinic near her home but was not able to receive help. The clinic suggested that Srey Vin travel two and a half hours to our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), for consultation. At CSC, Srey Vin was diagnosed with a giant cell granuloma - a benign tumor that grows from bone cells. They most often occur in the front portion of the lower jaw. These tumors can grow rapidly, cause pain and destroy bone. The tumor has grown very large in Srey Vin's jaw. As a result, she experiences discomfort and difficulty eating and talking. She worries about the tumor growing even larger. Fortunately, the surgeons at CSC can help Srey Vin. On November 7th, Srey Vin will undergo surgery to remove the mass and place a bone graft from her left fibula onto her mandible. Hopefully, this procedure will decrease the pain and discomfort Srey Vin experiences and improve her ability to talk and eat. Her family needs help to fund the $726 operation. Srey Vin shared, "I hope I can remove this growth so I stop worrying all the time and can take care of my son."

$726raised
Fully funded

Sephania is a baby from Simanjiro, Arusha in Tanzania. He lives among the Maasai people. He comes from a large family of six siblings, raised by a single mother. His father died shortly after he was born, and his mother depends on her brothers, who are cattle breeders. They help provide basic needs for the family since his mother does not work and has no means to earn a living. Sephania was born with both his legs twisted inward and downward. His mother was informed that there was treatment for the condition. She could not afford transport money at the time and had to wait for almost 2 years before she was able to collect enough money to travel to a medical center. She arrived at our center with an escort, who helped her translate as she only speaks Maasai. After a brief assessment with our team, we set up a treatment plan for Sephania, starting with a series of castings. Sephania has clubfoot on both feet. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. Fortunately, Sephania traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on May 12th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Sephania's clubfoot repair. After treatment, he will be able to walk easily. Sephania’s mother says, "It has taken a while to be able to come for treatment. I hope my son will get treatment that will help with his foot’s condition."

$935raised
Fully funded