Tyler and Kate McEnteeMONTHLY DONOR
Tyler's Story

Tyler joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Six years ago, Tyler joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Tyler's most recent donation traveled 8,500 miles to support Meshack, a young baby from Kenya, to fund life-changung treatment for hypospadias.

Impact

Tyler has funded healthcare for 79 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Tyler

Daw Mya is a 59-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her daughter, granddaughter, son, daughter-in-law, and grandson in Yangon, Burma. Daw Mya is currently too ill to work, but her daughter works as a seamstress in a factory. Her granddaughter goes to school, her son is a taxi driver, her daughter-in-law looks after their son at home. Her daughter and her son both help look after Daw Mya and try to support her as best they can. Daw Mya was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Daw Mya feels tired and experiences heart palpitations with chest pain. She has no appetite and cannot sleep well at night, and both of her legs are swollen. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Daw Mya. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 21st and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Daw Mya said, “I want to get better soon so that I can help my family. I want to help them because my daughter-in-law is always looking after me and her child [my grandson], so she cannot work. If I can look after the household chores and take care of the family, they can go to work and earn more income for our family. I cannot go anywhere because of my condition. They always take care of me and they spend too much of their money on me.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Otete is a joyful 5-year-old and the fifth-born child in a family of five children. He is a cheerful, happy, and hardworking boy for his age. Otete is already taking part in helping at home with daily life activities, like taking their father’s cattle with his older siblings out for grazing around the village. He has not had the chance to enroll in school yet due to the condition of his right leg. Otete’s parents come from a pastoralist region where their major source of a living is livestock keeping. Otete was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgum, or bow-leggedness. This condition causes his legs bow inward so that his knees touch. Bow-leggedness is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has pain after just a short distanced walk, and mornings can be a struggle. His parents shared that his legs are very painful when he tries to stand. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Otete. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 9th. Treatment will hopefully restore Otete's mobility, allowing him to return to some of his normal life activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Otete’s father shared, “We are concerned our son will not be able to walk by himself anymore if his legs are not set correctly. Please help our son as the cost is too high for us to afford.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Shamra is a 3-year-old baby girl from Tanzania. She is the firstborn of two children in her family. Shamra has clubfoot of her left foot. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes her difficulty with walking and wearing shoes. She needs surgery to help re-position her foot correctly. Currently, Shamra and her sibling are being looked after by their grandmother because their mother has been sick for a long time and is unable to care for herself and her children. Given her age, their grandmother shared with us that she is really struggling to provide and care for both her daughter and and her grandchildren. Shamra’s grandmother sells boiled maize and groundnuts by the roadside in order to feed and care for her sick daughter and her grandchildren. Shamra's father has been absent for some time and does not provide support for their family. Their family appeals for financial support for the care that Shamra needs. Fortunately, Shamra traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery and ongoing treatment starting on January 19th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Shamra's clubfoot repair. After treatment, she will be able to walk and play easily again. Shamra’s grandmother shared, “Please help my granddaughter as we are going through a very challenging situation and we have no means to raise the money we need. Thank you for any support you can provide.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Pamela is wheeled into the consultation room wincing in pain. She briefly smiles but gets back to a serious face. Pamela is a widow whose husband passed away in 1993. After his passing, family conflicts forced her to move from their home village in Migori and settle in a crowded, more run-down neighborhood near Eastleigh. She used to work as a tailor but, after she needed a wheelchair in 2011, she has been unable to work. Pamela lives in a single room tin-roofed house and the local church helps to support her rent. She doesn’t have an ID so it has been hard for her to access local services such as medical support. Pamela told us that she has been relying on well-wishers and their local church for survival and her closest relatives live in Migori and rarely are able to offer her support. Pamela arrived to the hospital with bladder calculus with recurrent UTI that requires an urgent cystolithotomy, a curative laparotomy procedure, to aid relieve her stomach pains that have been recurrent for many years now. According to her neighbors who brought her to the facility, she had been in severe pain the whole night, and the medicine that she received from a nearby dispensary were not helping her. Pamela has been through a lot medically and socially. In late 2011, she suffered from TB of her spine and underwent spinal surgery. She has been using a wheelchair since then. In mid-2017, her stomach pains started and in November 2019, she underwent several tests and was booked for surgery at a hospital. She didn’t have funds so she went back home and continued managing her pains with pain medication. Upon hearing about Watsi's Medical Partner Kijabe Hospital, she came hoping for treatment. On November 7th this year, she was reviewed by the doctors and several tests were done which revealed her condition and need for surgery. She was discharged home and booked for a follow up appointment and possible surgery next week (November 23rd) but because of the pains, she was rushed back to the hospital. Pamela shared with us, “This is my only option to get rid of the pains. I have tried several medications but they are not working. I really need assistance to get this surgery. “

$616raised
Fully funded

Megan is a 3-month old baby girl from Tanzania, and the only child to her single mother. Megan was born with clubfoot and spina bifida, which contributed to her acquiring hydrocephalus. Megan’s father left their family when her mother was five months pregnant and they lost any contact with him. Megan's grandmother, who was also a single mom after her husband passed away at a young age, depends on selling second-hand clothes. Her income is very limited to be able to provide for her children and be able to afford school fees. Due to this, Megan's mother was not able to continue with her studies due to financial challenges and joined her mother in selling second hand clothes. Megan has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of her condition, Megan has been experiencing an increasing head circumference. Without treatment, Megan will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Megan that will treat her hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 21st and will drain the excess fluid from Megan's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Megan will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Megan’s mother says, “I have no one to run to for help and support, all my relatives have told me they can no longer support us in any way and yet my daughter is suffering. Please help save my daughter.”

$1,300raised
Fully funded