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Meet another patient

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Success! Xyrie from the Philippines raised $1,279 to fund treatment for her birth condition.

Xyrie
100%
  • $1,279 raised, $0 to go
$1,279
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Xyrie's treatment was fully funded on April 15, 2022.

Photo of Xyrie post-operation

April 21, 2022

Xyrie underwent treatment for her birth condition.

Xyrie’s surgery was successful! Her family is so happy to see her more comfortable now that she doesn’t need a colostomy bag. They shared how excited they are that she can now play like all the other kids do.

“We don’t have to buy her colostomy supplies anymore, and can now start her potty training,” her mother shared excitedly. “We’re really grateful to Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines for all your help,” she added.

Xyrie’s surgery was successful! Her family is so happy to see her more comfortable now that she doesn't need a colostomy bag. They shared ho...

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April 4, 2022

Xyrie is an adorable 18-month-old girl from the Philippines. She loves to watch educational videos and is learning the alphabet. Her mother, who works as a public school teacher, is the sole breadwinner of their family. With her mother’s income, Xyrie’s family has tried hard to access care for her medical needs.

Xyrie was born with an anorectal malformation, a congenital abnormality that leads to a complete or partial intestinal blockage. She needs to undergo a series of procedures to eliminate bowel dysfunction.

Xyrie is scheduled to undergo surgery to correct her condition on April 6th. Our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines, is requesting $1,279 to cover the total cost of Xyrie’s procedure and care. After her recovery, Xyrie will no longer experience bowel dysfunction or be at risk of developing health complications in the future.

“It will be so much more convenient for Xyrie to move without the colostomy bag, and we don’t have to buy her colostomy supplies anymore. I also won’t have to worry that she’ll be bullied when she grows up,” Neriza, her mother shared. “The help provided by WSFP and Watsi are really of big help to our family,” added Neriza.

Xyrie is an adorable 18-month-old girl from the Philippines. She loves to watch educational videos and is learning the alphabet. Her mother,...

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Xyrie's Timeline

  • April 4, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Xyrie was submitted by Abegail Joy Cervania, Marketing and Communications Officer at World Surgical Foundation Philippines.

  • April 6, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Xyrie received treatment at Our Lady of Peace Hospital in Philippines. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 8, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Xyrie's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 15, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Xyrie's treatment was fully funded.

  • April 21, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Xyrie's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 20 donors

Funded by 20 donors

Treatment
Anorectal Malformation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,279 for Xyrie's treatment
Hospital Fees
$277
Medical Staff
$330
Medication
$180
Supplies
$166
Labs
$201
Radiology
$11
Other
$114
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Children born with anorectal malformations have dysfunctional bowels due to closure or partial closure of the anus.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Children with anorectal malformations are at risk for growth and motor development impairments and other severe complications. The child may also feel isolated or stigmatized given the dysfunctional bowel movement.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Teenage and late presentation for treatment of anorectal malformations is not uncommon in the developing world. Some of the reasons for late presentation include but are not limited to illiteracy, poverty, lack of awareness, and limited trained pediatric surgeons. In rural areas, babies with this condition can be considered cursed and are marginalized.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The anus will be surgically created within the sphincter muscle of the patient.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The procedure gives the child a new chance at life without the shame of dysfunctional bowel movement, the need for a different diet, and dependence on his/her parents for irrigation and ostomy pouch. A better quality of life awaits every child who undergoes the procedure.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Some of the potential side effects or complications include infection of the surgical site, narrowing of the anal canal, inability to control bowel movements, and rectum collapse.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

World Surgical Foundation Philippines programs are known throughout the country so patients often travel from other islands and provinces where care isn't available to access treatment in the capital city.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Patients with minimal bowel passage and without access to surgery opt for dilatation or irrigation to help pass stool easily.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Agnes

Meet Agnes, a hardworking 39-year-old farmer and strong single mother. Two of her children live with her brother in a rural area of the country, while her other children live with Agnes in a house in a small shopping center. Agnes works hard to sustain her family. She does laundry in her neighborhood during the day, while selling vegetables in the evening. During the planting, weeding and harvesting seasons, Agnes goes to the village and works on people's farms. Sometimes she is paid with money, and sometimes she is given food in return for her work. Nine months ago, she was pricked by a maize stalk on her lower left limb. She was walking with difficulty because of the pain that resulted from the wound, and she ended up falling. Agnes traveled to a local facility because of pain and swelling in her leg, and was provided with pain medication and bandages. However, Agnes was referred on to another hospital, where her leg could be X-rayed. The X-ray revealed that Agnes had sustained a fracture in her lower leg. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, can help. On September 1st, Agnes will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation, at AIC Kapsowar Hospital. After this procedure, Agnes will be able to walk without pain and swelling, enabling her to return to her daily activities, and the work that she needs to do in order to earn an income. African Mission Healthcare Foundation is seeking $941 to fund her procedure and medical care. Agnes says: "My family depends on me in everything. With my condition, I cannot work and am afraid that my children will suffer. Kindly help me get through my treatment and be able to provide for them.”

39% funded

39%funded
$375raised
$566to go
Mo

Mo is a 72-year-old woman who lives with her friend and friend’s grandson in Burma. During her free time, she enjoys selling vegetables that she foraged. She and her friend are both domestic workers, but Mo had to stop working two months ago due to her worsening condition. Once she stopped working, they began having difficulty purchasing food for themselves. However, Mo shares that her neighbors kindly started providing them with donated food, helping them get by. One day while washing clothes, Mo noticed that her lower left leg and foot were swollen and in pain. Over time, she developed multiple ulcers on the swollen area. She eventually stopped working and sought medical treatment at a nearby village clinic. However, the medication she received unfortunately did not help her condition, and she could not seek treatment elsewhere due to financial constraints. Over time, the ulcers became larger and more painful, preventing her from putting any weight on her left foot and walking. Her condition is also causing her to experience weakness, difficulty sleeping, a decreased appetite, and emotional distress. After a worried neighbor took a picture of Mo and posted it on Facebook explaining her situation and requesting the assistance of donors, a charity group saw the post and traveled to Mo’s house. One of the group's members is a doctor and recommended that she visit a hospital due to her leg being badly infected. The charity group members brought her to our medical partner's care center Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH). There, Mo underwent a physical examination and was diagnosed with chronic ulcers due to Buerger’s disease, a condition that affects blood vessels in the body, causing them to swell. This can prevent blood flow and lead to clots forming. Her doctor recommends that her left leg, which has began turning black from the knee down, be amputated as soon as possible due to it being severely infected. Mo shared that neither she nor the charity group have enough money to fund her needed surgery. Fortunately, a doctor recommended Mo to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, who is helping her receive treatment. On August 4th, surgeons will perform a leg amputation, which will hopefully alleviate Mo from her pain and discomfort. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Mo shares, “At first, I felt hopeless, and I would cry every day and night. I had no one that I could ask for help. I am no longer able to bear this pain. I want to say thank you to everyone who has helped me.”

73% funded

73%funded
$1,107raised
$393to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Agnes

Meet Agnes, a hardworking 39-year-old farmer and strong single mother. Two of her children live with her brother in a rural area of the country, while her other children live with Agnes in a house in a small shopping center. Agnes works hard to sustain her family. She does laundry in her neighborhood during the day, while selling vegetables in the evening. During the planting, weeding and harvesting seasons, Agnes goes to the village and works on people's farms. Sometimes she is paid with money, and sometimes she is given food in return for her work. Nine months ago, she was pricked by a maize stalk on her lower left limb. She was walking with difficulty because of the pain that resulted from the wound, and she ended up falling. Agnes traveled to a local facility because of pain and swelling in her leg, and was provided with pain medication and bandages. However, Agnes was referred on to another hospital, where her leg could be X-rayed. The X-ray revealed that Agnes had sustained a fracture in her lower leg. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, can help. On September 1st, Agnes will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation, at AIC Kapsowar Hospital. After this procedure, Agnes will be able to walk without pain and swelling, enabling her to return to her daily activities, and the work that she needs to do in order to earn an income. African Mission Healthcare Foundation is seeking $941 to fund her procedure and medical care. Agnes says: "My family depends on me in everything. With my condition, I cannot work and am afraid that my children will suffer. Kindly help me get through my treatment and be able to provide for them.”

39% funded

39%funded
$375raised
$566to go