Tina HsiehMONTHLY DONOR
Tina's Story

Tina joined Watsi on November 9th, 2018. Three years ago, Tina joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Tina's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Votey, a mother from Cambodia, to fund fracture repair surgery following an accident.

Impact

Tina has funded healthcare for 42 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by Tina

Arnold is a 40-year-old married man with three children; aged 15, 10, and 3. He is a truck driver and his wife helps take care of their family and home. Since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, his work has decreased. Also, his driving license is currently expired which means that he cannot work as a truck driver until he's able to renew the license. Since last year, Arnold has had a chronic cough. He sought medical care and tested negative for Tuberculosis more than four times; he was frequently put on antibiotics. Late last year, he started noticing a protruding swelling on his neck along with his persistent cough. He again sought medical attention from a health center and was referred to the public hospital. At the hospital, they suspected that he had a goiter and was referred to Partners in Hope (PIH) for thyroid tests since the other facility had no reagents for these tests. At PiH, Arnold was diagnosed with goiter. Doctors recommend that he has his thyroid removed in a procedure called thyroidectomy. A goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland; a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck. Although goiters are usually painless, a large goiter can cause a cough, irritation and may also cause difficulty in swallowing and breathing. Arnold is afraid that his thyroid might grow bigger if he does not have it removed. It is expected that after surgery, the symptoms will heal and his neck will return to its normal size. Arnold appeals for financial assistance as he is not financially able to pay for the surgery. Arnold says, "My worry is that the goiter might grow bigger. I hope to get treatment before the condition worsens."

71%funded
$727raised
$288to go

Isaack is an energetic 21-year-old from Kiambu County in Kenya. He is the fourth born in a family of seven. His mother works as a housewife and his father works as a small businessman and lives in western Kenya. Isaack works on construction sites and enjoys playing football during his free time. Last Sunday, Isaack was playing football with his friends when he bumped into a fellow player and fell. Instantly they knew his injury was serious because his tibial shaft assumed a C-like shape and begun to swell. Isaack was brought to Nazareth Hospital. The fracture was stabilized with a splint. Isaack was instructed to go home and await for potential surgery while the swelling went down. Upon review by the surgeon, an implant is recommended to ensure he heals. When Isaack was informed of the money required for surgery he asked the surgeon if there was any other treatment option because he had no way to raise the funds necessary and his family was not in a position to contribute to his bill. The surgeon explained that the nature of the fracture requires surgery for proper healing and referred him to the Watsi-AMH program. If not treated the fracture on Isaack’s left leg may heal with a deformity leading to reduced functionality of his left lower limb, thus affecting his mobility, which is an important for allowing him to work and earn money to support himself and his family. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner AMH can help. On September 2nd, Isaack will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. If treated, the fracture on Isaack’s left leg will heal without any deformity and allow him to walk with ease. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. Isaack remarked, “I look forward to the day I will be able to play on the football field again and go to work with ease so that I can fend for myself as I am used to.”

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Jackson is a 2-month-old baby boy and the youngest in his family of four. He was born in December to the joy of his grandmother and parents. During his initial examination after birth, Jackson was found to have a swelling in a private area. The nurse advised Jackson’s mother that the condition did not require any urgent attention. While at home, his mother noticed that whenever she was bathing him and touched the area, Jackson experienced a lot of pain and would cry a lot. A few days later, Jackson’s mother took him to the nearest hospital to their home. During the examination, the doctor diagnosed Jackson with a bilateral inguinal hernia. Jackson was prescribed some pain medication and scheduled for follow-up visits at the clinic, but his condition did not improve. A friend of his mother heard about Jackson’s condition and referred them to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center BethanyKids Hospital. There, the doctor recommended hernia repair surgery to relieve Jackson of his pain and reduce the chances of him having any future complications. However, Jackson's parents cannot afford the cost of his care. His mother is a small-scale farmer, while his father does casual jobs at a construction site. They make a humble living and sometimes rely on Jackson’s grandparents for food. The family does not have National Health Insurance Fund coverage, and appeals for financial support for Jackson's surgery. Fortunately, on February 22nd, Jackson will undergo hernia repair surgery at our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $554 to fund Jackson's surgery. Once completed, this procedure will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and grow up to be a happy, healthy boy. Jackson’s grandmother shared, “It feels very sad for a parent when their newly born baby is experiencing some pain. It is more painful to the parents if they cannot raise the required amount to cater for the baby’s treatment. My prayer is for Jackson to receive treatment.”

$554raised
Fully funded

Myo is a 16-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents and four brothers in northern Rakhine State. Myo is a student in grade nine and his four brothers also go to school. However, they have been unable to study since the Covid-19 pandemic shut all schools. Myo’s parents are day laborers, and their family's combined income is just enough to cover their daily expenses since Myo and his brothers’ schooling is free. To survive with limited income, they forage for vegetables and fish. If they fall ill, they use traditional medicine, which is more affordable then going to a clinic or a hospital. Myo was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, which is the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Myo cannot walk long distances or climb stairs because of his tiredness. Sometimes, he cannot breathe very well. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Myo. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 7th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Myo shared, “I am worried about my health and I feel sorry for my parents. Because of my health problems, my father had to work more days to earn more money. Also, my mother cannot work because she accompanies me and has to take care of me. I hope my school will reopen soon so that I can go back to school. One day I hope that I can become a teacher. I want to teach because there are not enough teachers in my village.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded