Neeraj KumarMONTHLY DONOR
Neeraj's Story

Neeraj joined Watsi on July 9th, 2014. Seven years ago, Neeraj joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Neeraj's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Dom, a traditional pottery maker from Cambodia, to fund hip replacement surgery so she can walk again.

Impact

Neeraj has funded healthcare for 112 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Neeraj

Poe is a 45-year-old man who lives with his wife in a hut in a village in Myawaddy Township in Burma. Poe and his wife are agricultural day labourers, but he had to stop working two to three months ago, when his condition worsened. The income she earns is usually just enough to cover their daily expenses, but if she cannot find work, they have to borrow money to make ends meet. Around seven years ago, Poe got bamboo splinters in his left foot while working on a farm. He was able to pick out the splinters and applied traditional medicine to his foot, which healed. A little while later, he developed pain where he had the splinters before and went to a nearby clinic. A nurse checked his foot but told him that she could not find anything wrong with his foot. The nurse gave him pain medication and Poe went back home. After he took the medication, he felt better. Six or seven months later, his pain returned, and he also developed an infection. When he went back to the clinic, the nurse checked his foot and told him to go to a hospital since he signs of a severe infection. The nurse also gave him medication. He then went to Myawaddy General Hospital, where he had the ulcer cleaned with an antiseptic solution and was given medication. When he went home, he felt better. Two years ago, the pain and ulcer returned but in a larger area then previously. He went back to Myawaddy General Hospital, where he received an x-ray. He was told that his foot was infected due to his previous injury. His foot was cleaned again with an antiseptic solution, and he was given antibiotics. After he took the medication, he felt better again. Just a few months ago, Poe’s foot started to hurt again. However, he was not worried about his foot because the last time his foot had hurt, he had had the ulcers drained. When the pain and swelling increased in his foot, he was no longer able to work. Although he wanted to go to the hospital, he did not have enough money to go this time since he was not working. His brother then told him to go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) in nearby Mon State since it is more affordable. When Poe arrived at MCLH at the end of November, he was admitted after the doctor examined his foot. He received another x-ray and was told that the ulcers and an infection had spread to multiple areas. He was also told that because of how advanced his condition is, his foot could never heal fully, and the only option at this point was to amputate his foot. “I’ve been to many hospitals and clinics already,” said Poe. “The doctor told me that if I amputate my foot my condition will no longer return. So I am happy to go ahead with the procedure.” Currently, Poe’s left ankle and feet is swollen and painful. The pain is worse at night and when the temperature drops. He has multiple ulcers in his foot with discharge and he feels extremely uncomfortable. Some areas of his foot are itchy and painful while he has lost sensation in the top of his foot and areas around his ankle. Cannot put any weight on his left foot due to the pain and has to be pushed in a wheelchair since he arrived at MCLH. He's hopeful about feeling better soon and getting back to working. Poe shared, “In the future I want to buy one or two cows to breed and rear them to earn an income. I also want to grow and sell vegetables."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Loisi is a mother of three children between the ages of 2 and 12 years old. She separated from her husband around the time when her youngest child was seven months old. Loisi lives with her children and her mother, and she owns a small business selling vegetables to support her family. One of the locations where she sells is at our medical partner's care center and she learned that treatment may be possible to help her finally heal. In 2019, Loisi had a Cesarean section during the birth of her youngest child. It took up to four months for her wound to heal and, six months later, her abdomen never decreased and continued to grow. Loisi's business has suffered as a result. She has difficulty carrying large baskets of vegetables and walking long distances, and she has had to spend parts of her income on new clothing. She also shared that mockery from the community regarding her appearance has affected her self-esteem. Loisi visited the hospital where she received a C-Section but was not able to receive help. However, when selling vegetables at the care center, a nurse referred her to a surgeon. Loisi was diagnosed with a hernia, a condition where part of the abdominal wall is damaged or weakened, causing parts of the small intestine or abdomen to bulge outward. If not treated, hernias may cause pain and discomfort and, in rare cases, cause life-threatening strangulation of blood flow to part of the intestines. On October 5th, surgeons will perform a hernia repair surgery. AMH is requesting $575 to help fund this procedure. Loisi is hopeful that this surgery will improve her ability to sell vegetables and provide for her family's well-being, as well as restore her position in her community. She shared, "This condition has caused me a lot of mockeries, and it even cost me my marriage. I believe, after the surgery, I will regain the size of my normal tummy. I will live an improved life."

$575raised
Fully funded

Naw Eh is a 11-year-old girl who lives with her mother, five brother and two sisters in a refugee camp. She and her siblings study in the refugee camp while her mother weaves traditional indigenous Karen shirts to earn extra income for their household. In her free time, Naw Eh loves to play with her younger brother at home. Sometimes, she will play with her friends close to her house. She wants to be an English teacher at a primary school in the future. In late July 2021, Naw Eh went out to buy some snacks from a shop. On the way to the shop, she slipped and fell on the muddy road. When she fell she hurt her left leg. Since she was able to walk slowly, the medic in the camp did not think her leg was broken and only gave her pain medication. On 19 August 2021, Naw Eh lost her grip when she was sitting down in a chair and fell down. This time she could not stand up or walk. After a doctor at Mae Sariang Hospital diagnosed her with a fractured femur, she was referred to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. At that hospital, the doctor told Naw Eh's brother that they want to do an MRI of her leg to check if she has any underlying conditions that caused her to break her femur so easily. With support from Watsi, the MRI was possible and now the surgeon has determined that surgery is required to help her leg heal properly. Currently, Naw Eh suffers from pain in her left leg and she cannot move or put weight on that leg. If she moves her leg, the pain increases. Her brother needs to help her use the bedpan as she cannot walk to the toilet. He also needs to help her get dressed. She is taking pain medication to help her sleep at night. She is worried that if her condition is not treated properly, she will never be able to walk again. She misses going to school and wants to continue her studies in grade four once her school reopens. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Eh will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for September 2nd and will cost $1,500. After surgery, Naw Eh will no longer experience pain in her leg and she will be able to get herself dress and be able to walk to the toilet. Naw Eh said, "I am worried that if I do not receive surgery and receive proper treatment, I will not be able to walk again."

$1,500raised
Fully funded