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Ron Green

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

Ron's Story

Ron joined Watsi on January 3rd, 2014. Six years ago, Ron joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Ron's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Glory, a four-year-old girl from Tanzania, to fund corrective surgery to help her walk and play.

Impact

Ron has funded healthcare for 74 patients in 12 countries.

All patients funded by Ron

Kyomukama

Kyomukama is a 51-year-old woman from Uganda. Kyomukama is a mother of seven and is a small-scale farmer while her husband is a primary school teacher. Their firstborn is now 31 years old and is married already. All their other six children are in school and the cost of their school fees is a major challenge for the family. Kyomukama started having backaches about five years ago. She visited different clinics and could only get tablets to relieve her pain. This pain has persisted over time and has now spread to her legs, abdomen and joints. She came to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Rushoroza Hospital to seek medical advice. At Rushoroza, she presented with chronic pelvic pain and scan results show she has intra-uterine fibroids. If not treated, pain could stop her from doing her day to day survival activities and her quality of life will continue to be be affected negatively. Kyomukama can no longer do heavy work and has no peace at all due to her pains; her production in agriculture has been reduced. During her free time, she likes making handcrafts but has now started making them full time since she can’t go to the fields to practice farming. She is seeking financial support for the surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Kyomukama's surgery. On October 7th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Kyomukama will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve. Kyomukama says, “My family cannot afford the surgery charges and I am in a lot of pain. I will resume farming as soon as possible once given treatment.”

100% funded

$228raised
Fully funded
Mo

Mo is a 22-year-old student from Thailand. He lives along with his father in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. While living in the camp, Mo finished high school and is now completing post-high school education. Their household receives 480 baht (approx. $16 USD) each month as part of their food support from an organization called The Border Consortium. However, this amount is not enough to cover their daily needs. Therefore, Mo's father works as a seasonal agricultural day laborer in a nearby village. He is able to earn an extra 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) in a month but this amount is still not enough and they shared that they struggle to make ends meet despite having free basic health care and education in the camp. In early September, Mo started to feel dizzy frequently, especially whenever he stood up. At first, he thought he would feel better after he rested and slept. However, he was unable to sleep well for about a week and was suffering from insomnia. After a medic examined him he was referred to the local hospital for treatment. The doctor at the local hospital referred him to Chiang Mai Hospital (CMH) to see a neurologist. After he returned to the camp, Mo rapidly started to lose his vision in both of his eyes. An NGO called Malteser International Thailand (MI) was able to arrange Moses’ travel documents, he was brought to CMH on October 5th, 2020. The next day, he received a CT scan which showed that he has a mass in his brain and a build-up of cerebrospinal fluid in his brain due to the mass. Because of the severity of his condition, the doctor scheduled him to receive surgery right away on October 9th. The mass will be removed and sent for biopsy. He will also undergo a procedure to receive a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt to drain the excess fluid from his brain. Currently, Mo has a headache, and he is not able to move his eyes from side to side. He needs his father to accompany him wherever he goes because he can no longer see far. He spends most of his time lying down in bed and needs to be pushed in a wheelchair to get around due to his new vision problems. Mo sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. He is now scheduled to undergo a brain mass removal surgery on October 9th. He is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. “Life suddenly become darker without me knowing why," said Mo. "It is extremely difficult for me to even go to the toilet [by myself]. I cry while I lay in bed for many hours. I really miss seeing colors."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Johnson

Johnson is an 8-month baby boy from Tanzania. Johnson, the last born child in a family of four, and already is a very active and friendly little boy. Johnson's parents are both subsistence farmers. Johnson was born in a local hospital where his parents were informed that his spine was not fully formed, thus resulting in a condition known as spinal bifida. Because Johnson's condition was not severe, they were informed that he wouldn’t need treatment and that it would close on its own. As their family continued to attend clinics they were told to wait till Johnson gets to five months old for him to have any kind of treatment. At five months they took him to hospital for the treatment but the cost was too high for them to afford and they had to return home. As time went by, Johnson's mother saw that his condition could end up complicated if he didn’t get treatment soon and end up greatly affecting Johnson later in life. She decided to seek treatment. She went to Mt Meru and was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC for more help.  Johnson was born with spina bifida, a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Johnson is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,015 to cover the cost of Johnson's spina bifida closure surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on September 7th. This procedure will hopefully spare Johnson from the risks associated with his condition, instead allowing him to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Johnson’s mother says, “We are concerned if our son does not get his spine corrected, it might affect his ability to walk. Please help my son.”

100% funded

$1,015raised
Fully funded