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Tun is a refugee from Thailand who needs $1,500 to fund a cholecystectomy to remove his gallbladder.

Tun
80%
  • $1,203 raised, $297 to go
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$297
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February 16, 2021

Tun is a 73-year-old man who lives with his three daughters in Umpiem Mai Refugee Camp in Thailand. Each month, Tun’s household receives a small cash card to purchase rations in the camp, and their monthly household income is just enough to cover daily expenses. In his free time, Tun loves to read books and loves telling stories to his neighbours’ children. He is always welcoming, giving the children snacks and telling them stories from his home. Tun also loves to grow different types of vegetables around his house, sharing the harvest with his neighbours who cannot afford to buy vegetables. Before he felt unwell, Tun used to volunteer, organising cleaning groups in the camp and helping with road repairs.

Currently, Tun experiences on and off pain in his upper abdomen. He also has a slight fever and often feels nauseous. Over time, his appetite has gradually decreased, and he has lost weight. Tun has been advised to undergo a cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder. If his condition is left untreated, Tun’s symptoms will continue to worsen and he will be at risk for further health complications in the future.

After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Tun is scheduled to undergo his cholecystectomy on February 16th. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Tun’s procedure and care. Once recovered, he will able to resume gardening, volunteering, and socializing with others in the camp.

Tun shared, “I love volunteering and I am happy to help the community with whatever I can. But since I got sick, I cannot participate, and I cannot go to the monastery to help clean nor can I meditate. If I ever feel better again, I will continue to help my community with whatever I can do and I will also continue to grow vegetables around my house for my family and for my neighbours.”

Tun is a 73-year-old man who lives with his three daughters in Umpiem Mai Refugee Camp in Thailand. Each month, Tun's household receives a s...

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Tun's Timeline

  • February 16, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Tun was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Thailand.

  • February 16, 2021
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Tun was scheduled to receive treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 17, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Tun's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Tun is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Tun's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

Treatment
Cholecystectomy (Biliary Obstruction)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $3,729 for Tun's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,229 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,430
Medical Staff
$966
Medication
$12
Supplies
$187
Labs
$84
Radiology
$879
Other
$171
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients experience abdominal pain, jaundice, fever, nausea, and bloating.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients are in a great deal of pain. They cannot work regularly or even sleep comfortably.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Patients cannot afford to go to the hospital. Many people rely on medications provided by dealers who are not authorized pharmacists.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Ultrasound testing is the first diagnostic test. When the diagnosis is confirmed, surgery is scheduled. The gallbladder is removed through an incision on the right side under the rib cage. The patient usually spends 4-5 days in the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

After the surgery, the patient will no longer be in pain, and his or her jaundice will reduce.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, fever, pneumonia, heart complications, UTIs, blood clots, renal failure, bile duct injuries, retention of the bile duct stone, and death.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. Without surgery, the stones may grow larger. The patient will live in discomfort and may risk death.

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Say

Say is a four-year-old boy who lives with his mother, brother, sister, and grandfather in a refugee camp on the border of Thailand. His father returned to Burma to visit his village last year. When Thailand closed its borders because of the COVID-19 outbreak, his father could not come back to the camp. Say's grandfather is an assistant pastor in the camp and he receives his income through donations when he visits his church members for home prayers. Say goes to nursery school while both of his siblings go to primary school. His mother does all the household chores. Every month, their household receives some funding to purchase rations in the camp, which is just enough for their basic needs. They receive free healthcare and education in the camp, but specialized procedures like the care that Say needs are often not possible. In early February 2021, Say developed an inguinal hernia on his right side, which has resulted in swelling and pain. His mother has noticed that since he developed the hernia, his appetite has decreased, as eating more can sometimes cause additional discomfort. Fortunately, on March 25th, he will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Say's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on March 25th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Say's mother said, "When I heard that my son needs surgery, I became so worried because he is the youngest in our family." She is eager for the surgery to be complete and for Say to have healed.

79% funded

79%funded
$1,199raised
$301to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.