Jordan NeumeyerUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Jordan's Story

Jordan joined Watsi on September 8th, 2014. Nine years ago, Jordan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Jordan's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Reuben, a cheerful five-year-old boy from Tanzania, to fund surgery to improve mobility.

Impact

Jordan has funded healthcare for 113 patients in 11 countries.

Patients funded by Jordan

Reuben is a charming five-year-old boy from Karatu district in Tanzania, the third child born in a family of four children. He is a cheerful and active child, who particularly enjoys soccer. His family relies on farming for both sustenance and income, but the proceeds are often barely enough to meet the family's needs. Consequently, they struggle to meet medical expenses and are earnestly seeking assistance. Reuben was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus, a condition where legs curve outward at the knees while the feet and ankles touch. His legs began to bow out at the age of two, and as he continued to grow, this condition worsened, making it challenging for him to walk long distances. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, his walking became energy-intensive, and he developed an uncomfortable gait. Recently, these mobility issues have significantly impacted his participation in beloved activities like playing soccer. Concerned about the potential hindrance this untreated condition may pose when Reuben begins school, especially due to the pain he experiences while walking and the distance of the school from home, his parents sought treatment at a local hospital. However, they were compelled to halt the treatment due to the high treatment costs. Their knowledge of our medical partner's care center, Kafika House, stemmed from a doctor who attended to Reuben two years ago. Consequently, they have embarked on a quest for his medical treatment again. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Reuben receive treatment. On May 7th, surgeons will perform a reconstructive surgery that will restore Reuben's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Now, Reuben's family needs help to fund this $880 procedure. Ruben’s father says: “I hope my son will get treatment to correct his legs so that it is easy for him when he starts school.”

$214raised
$666to go

Ko Tin is a 34-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his parents and his younger brother in a village in Yangon Division, Burma. He used to be a driver before his condition got worse but now he has stopped. Currently, Ko Tin is living with his parents who are farmers and support him. The whole family’s income is just enough for their basic expenses and basic health care. Ko Tin has a wife who went to Thailand for work about four months ago but he has lost contact with her. When he has the energy and free time, Ko Tin likes playing football with friends. Ko Tin was diagnosed with a heart condition that requires replacement of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. In mid October, Ko Tin experienced fever, cough, body pain, difficult breathing, and severe fatigue when he walks a short distance. After he visited the cardiologist in Yangon Hospital, he was diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation and doctor recommend that he should receive surgery. Currently, Ko Tin feels tired, coughs often, and is experiencing difficult breathing. Sometimes, he feels pain from his legs and his arms, and he cannot sleep well at night. He will feel extremely fatigued with shortness of breath when he lays down on the floor. He also cannot walk long distances. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Ko Tin. The treatment is scheduled to take place at Pun Hlaing Hospital on December 3rd and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably. Ko Tin said, “I would like to recover as soon as possible. My parents are worried about me, and they have difficulty earning enough money to pay for my treatment. I hope my wife to return, and I would like to live as a happy family.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Keisha is a 5-month-old baby from Haiti, where she lives with parents and her older sister. Keisha is just starting to smile. Keisha has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid –the fluid which surrounds the brain– accumulates in the brain, increasing intracranial pressure. The accumulation of fluid has caused Keisha's head to expand beyond a normal range. In addition, Keisha has been experiencing another symptom--her eyes are focused downward (sometimes called “sunsetting of the eyes”). Keisha was brought to the hospital recently, needing emergency treatment for the pressure in her head. The neurosurgeon was able to temporarily relieve the pressure by removing some fluid from Keisha's head. But Keisha needs further treatment or else she will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Keisha is scheduled for surgery to put a flexible plastic tube called a shunt in her brain to redirect the cerebrospinal fluid into another part of her body. The shunt typically isn’t ever removed, and regular checkups are important to make sure it’s working. Draining the excess fluid from Keisha's brain will reduce the pressure and greatly improve the quality of her life. With proper treatment, Keisha will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Our medical partner, Project Medishare, is requesting $957 to cover the cost of surgery for Keisha at Hospital Bernard Mevs. This is the only site in Haiti where this care is currently available, and the procedure is scheduled to take place on October 19th. Keisha's family is hoping that the surgery will be a success and she can have a healthier future.

$957raised
Fully funded

Jeremia is a nine-month-old baby boy from the Ngorongoro district in Tanzania. He lives with his mother and over 20 family members in a boma, a type of family-based communal living space where the community provides for each other's basic needs. Jeremia's father works in the production and sale of sandals in the city and sends money to his family. He has been away from home for over a year. Jeremia was born with a birth condition wherein his right leg and foot is twisted inward and downward. After Jeremia’s birth, his mother had little to no understanding of this condition, and she has since lived with concerns about her son’s future. Our medical partner visited Ngorongoro earlier this year to hold outreach clinics. Jeremia's mother attended one of these medical clinics and received education about her son’s condition. She was relieved to hear that treatment options were available to help her son. Jeremia's mother appealed to her church to arrange for transportation to African Mission Healthcare's (AMH) care center in Arusha. Doctors diagnosed Jeremia with clubfoot, a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape. This causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. The medical team will begin clubfoot repair treatment for Jeremia on June 9th. After treatment and as he grows, he will be able to walk more easily, run, and play like any other children. Now, AMH is requesting $935 to fund Jeremia's treatment. Jeremia’s mother says, "I am happy that there is a possibility of treatment. I hope that all will go well and my son will be fine."

$935raised
Fully funded