Melissa RowlandMONTHLY DONOR
Melissa's Story

Melissa joined Watsi on August 12th, 2014. Eleven months ago, Melissa joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Melissa's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Ndaanya, a five-year-old boy from Tanzania, to fund clubfoot repair surgery.

Impact

Melissa has funded healthcare for 21 patients in 7 countries.

All patients funded by Melissa

Tun is a 73-year-old man who lives with his three daughters in Umpiem Mai Refugee Camp in Thailand. Each month, Tun's household receives a small cash card to purchase rations in the camp, and their monthly household income is just enough to cover daily expenses. In his free time, Tun loves to read books and loves telling stories to his neighbours’ children. He is always welcoming, giving the children snacks and telling them stories from his home. Tun also loves to grow different types of vegetables around his house, sharing the harvest with his neighbours who cannot afford to buy vegetables. Before he felt unwell, Tun used to volunteer, organising cleaning groups in the camp and helping with road repairs. Currently, Tun experiences on and off pain in his upper abdomen. He also has a slight fever and often feels nauseous. Over time, his appetite has gradually decreased, and he has lost weight. Tun has been advised to undergo a cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder. If his condition is left untreated, Tun's symptoms will continue to worsen and he will be at risk for further health complications in the future. After seeking treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Tun is scheduled to undergo his cholecystectomy on February 16th. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Tun's procedure and care. Once recovered, he will able to resume gardening, volunteering, and socializing with others in the camp. Tun shared, “I love volunteering and I am happy to help the community with whatever I can. But since I got sick, I cannot participate, and I cannot go to the monastery to help clean nor can I meditate. If I ever feel better again, I will continue to help my community with whatever I can do and I will also continue to grow vegetables around my house for my family and for my neighbours.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Herrieth is a one-month-old beautiful girl and the firstborn to her young parents who recently graduated from college. Herrieth’s father graduated as a clinical officer, while her mother graduated as a nurse. Unfortunately, both parents have not been able to get an employment opportunity yet. They now help each other make a living through a small business of selling fish in order to be able to raise and take care of their baby. Herrieth was born with a bilateral clubfoot, which her parents were informed is treatable, but due to financial challenges they couldn’t afford the treatment cost. If not treated, Harrieth will not be able to walk properly as she develops and her chances of growing up with disability will be very high. Her parents got to know about Watsi's medical partner and the possibility for their daughter to have her feet corrected, thus they are asking for help. Fortunately, Herrieth's family traveled to visit our medical partner's care center, Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre and The Plaster House. There, surgeons will perform clubfoot repair surgery on January 12th and provide critical follow-up care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Herrieth's clubfoot repair. After treatment, as she grows older, she will be able to walk easily, run, and play. Herrieth’s mother says: “We would love to see our daughter lead a normal life without the challenges that come along with being disabled. Please help her.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Joan is a 15-year-old student from Kenya. She is the third born in a family of five children, and is very calm and tends to be quiet. Joan is a hard-working, optimistic girl who hopes to excel in school, and she is currently in Grade Seven. Her dream is to become a teacher in future. In the second week of December, Joan was involved in a road accident as a pillion passenger which almost cost her her life. Her vehicle came into a head-on collision with a car, and she lost consciousness for more than three hours. Ultimately, Joan suffered a severe femur fracture and skin lacerations. Because she could not lift her leg, she was put on traction to bring stability to her leg. She is in pain on her right leg and unable to walk. Now, she needs to undergo a fracture repair procedure to heal her injury and avoid risk of further complications. Unfortunately, this procedure is costly for Joan and her family. Her mother is a potato farmer, while her father is ill and currently unable to work in the farm. Joan's mother is the sole breadwinner of the family, and she has found it hard to educate her children due to the family's income. Joan and her family live in a mud-built house that is not in good condition and they are unable to repair it due to lack of money. The family has raised some money for the surgery thus far, but needs more financial support to raise the total cost. They appeal for financial help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 17th, Joan will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After she is fully recovered, Joan will be able to walk with ease and will be able to pursue her dream of becoming a teacher. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,016 to fund this procedure. Joan shared, "My prayer is to finish school, have a good job and support my mum and my siblings."

$1,016raised
Fully funded