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Aareet Mahadevan

MONTHLY DONOREngineering. Social impact.

Canada   •   aareet.com

Aareet's Story

Aareet joined Watsi on December 9th, 2014. Six years ago, Aareet joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Aareet's most recent donation traveled 8,400 miles to support Zainabu, a bright young student from Tanzania, to fund mobility-restoring knee surgery.

Impact

Aareet has funded healthcare for 76 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Aareet

Zainabu

Zainabu is a 10-year-old student and the youngest in a family of six children. She is an intelligent, social, and hard-working girl both at home and at school. She is currently in class four and will be joining class five next year. Her best subjects are English and Swahili, and she proudly shared that she was position three in her class in the final exams this year. Go Zainbau :)! Zainbau loves to help her mother with home chores. Her parents are small scale farmers who sell maize, sorghum, and vegetables to make a living. They use most of their harvest of food for their family and are able to sell a few harvests in order to buy other basics. Zainabu was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus, or bowleggedness. This condition causes her legs to bow outwards at the knee. It is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, she has great difficulty with walking. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Zainabu. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 5th. Treatment will hopefully restore Zainabu's mobility, allow her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Zainabu’s father shared, “My daughter has been having difficulty walking for a while, but I was unable to help her due to financial challenges. My family and I are grateful for your help."

74% funded

74%funded
$657raised
$223to go
Nay Kaw

Nay Kaw is an 11-year-old boy from Burma. He lives with his parents, two older brothers and two younger sisters in a village in Karen State. Nay Kaw and his sister are both students. He is a grade one student since leaving the monkhood last year. His father is a farmer. Nay Kaw was born with a small mass on his right wrist. Once Nay Kaw's mother was able to save up and send him to Mae Tao Clinic for treatment in Thailand, Nay Kaw had the mass surgically removed in July at Mae Sot Hospital. After surgery, the biopsy revealed that the mass was caused by a hemangioma. As a result of this, the doctor referred him for further treatment in nearby Chiang Mai. Since his surgery, the pain in his wrist has decreased. However, if something touches his right wrist or if he has to carry something heavy in his right hand, he is in a lot of pain. Doctors want Nay Kaw to undergo an MRI, an imaging procedure that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of bodily organs. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $814 to cover the cost of Nay Kaw's MRI and care, scheduled for October 8th. "I want my right hand to be normal and I do not want to have an unusually large wrist," he said. "If the pain in my hand decreases, I will help my mother with the housework. If my hand will be without pain and I will be able to play with my friends at school, I will be happy with my friends again. In the future I will go school and become a good person."

90% funded

90%funded
$740raised
$74to go
Jane

Jane is a middle-aged woman from Kenya and a mother of three. She is a grocer in her hometown of Kapsokwony and lives in a rental house. Jane separated with his husband eight years ago when he remarried. That is when she decided to start her grocery business to, as she shared, "at least to get things going and put something on the table." Her children had to stop their schooling in grade 8 because she was unable to pay for their school fees. Jane’s condition begun over 10 years ago. She visited the nearest health facility but they could not help her condition hence she was asked to visit a better hospital for further investigations. Doctors examined her and she was diagnosed with a goitre that needed surgery. Not being the only one in the village with the same condition, Jane turned to herbal medicine just like the rest in her community. She continued using herbal medicines for many years but her condition did not improve in fact her condition was worsening. She could not work for long, she had difficulty in swallowing, and she lost weight and increased sensitivity to cold. She stopped using herbs and feels now she needs the right treatment which is through surgery. She started looking for solutions but everything seemed impossible without money. It was not until one evening when she was listening to the radio and heard the news about a free medical camp that was organized by Kapsowar Mission Hospital in their area. That is when Jane decided to seek consultation from Medical Partner's doctors. She was diagnosed with a multinodular goitre and was asked to come to the hospital for it to be removed surgically. Because of her socioeconomic status, Jane is unable to pay for her surgery but she is a strong believer and has a lot of hopes that she will receive treatment and get healed. She is requesting anyone reading her story to support her in raising money for her surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Jane receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on September 10th at our medical partner's care center. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. This procedure will cost $673 and she and her family need help raising money. Jane says, “I want this mass to be removed for two reasons; so that I can continue with my daily duties and also that the people in my community learn that herbal medicines cannot cure and they should seek medical care at the hospital.”

100% funded

$673raised
Fully funded
Poe

Poe is a five-year old boy who lives with his family in Shwe Koke Ko village of Karen State in Burma. In his free time, Poe likes to play with his friends and toys. He also likes to eat sweets. Poe does not go to school because of his condition. Poe's mother and father are divorced, and both are remarried. His father lives and works in Bangkok, Thailand and he contributes to Poe’s financial wellbeing by giving the household 5000 baht (approx. $167 USD) per month. His mother does not provide the family with any extra income. Poe stays with his grandmother and great grandmother from his father's side. His grandmother works as a cleaner. The rest of the family does not currently have work. When Poe was eight months old, he got a severe fever and his family took him to the Wang Pha clinic near Mae Sot, Thailand, which is the same place where he was born. He was admitted at the clinic for three days, but his condition did not improve. Doctors at the clinic told his family to take him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. The family immediately took him to MSH and he was admitted for one week. At MSH, he received a blood test and was diagnosed with Thalassemia, a blood disorder. He received a blood transfusion and after the transfusion, Poe felt better, but only temporarily. His family went back for three follow-up appointments to MSH, where he had blood transfusions each time. When he was one year and five months old, the family could not afford going to MSH any longer, so they took Poe to Myawaddy Hospital. He received another blood transfusion and an IV line. He was admitted for three days at the hospital. Although he felt better after getting discharged in Myawaddy, since his condition is chronic, he needs regular blood transfusions to stay healthy. It became increasingly difficult for the family to pay for Poe’s care, however, they decided to come to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) for further help in 2016. Since then, he has received many blood transfusions at MTC, sometimes monthly and sometimes bi-monthly. With these treatments, he is able to survive. However, his condition also affects his spleen, the organ that filters blood. To prevent further problems, medics at MTC told his family that doctors need to remove Poe's spleen. Since it cannot be done at MTC, he needs to go back to MSH to undergo the operation. Currently, Poe has frequent bloody noses, coughs up blood, and has blood in his stool. He feels better after having a transfusion, but it wears off in the weeks following the procedure. When its nearing time for another transfusion, he feels weak and tired. When asked what he wants to do when he grows up, Poe was adamant that he wanted to be a medic. “I want to help people,” he said. “When he sees people that are sick, he always tells me he feels sorry for them,” added his great grandmother.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded