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Success! Khin from Burma raised $1,500 to fund cardiac surgery.

Khin
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Khin's treatment was fully funded on October 29, 2020.

Photo of Khin post-operation

February 6, 2021

Khin underwent cardiac surgery.

Before surgery, Khin would feel tired and suffer from chest pain when she walked for a longer period of time. She had difficulty sleeping and would feel short of breath if she read or if she talked a bit. Since her heart surgery, she no longer suffers from chest pains nor does she feel tired. She can breathe well, even if she reads. “From the time that I received surgery, I feel hungry all the time and I can eat a lot,” she said. “Also I can sleep well at night.”

Khin has her future mapped out. “I will try to help my sister with chores such as cooking, washing, and sweeping. Also, I will continue to study at the university. After I graduate, I will try to work and support my parents. I will come to Yangon and work with my sister. While I work in Yangon, I will attend computer classes and English classes so that I can find a better job. However, I also thought about becoming a teacher. If I become a teacher, I can return to my village and live with my parents.”

Before surgery, Khin would feel tired and suffer from chest pain when she walked for a longer period of time. She had difficulty sleeping an...

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August 24, 2020

Khin Htay is a 26-year-old-Araknese woman who lives with her younger sister in Yangon, Burma. She is in her final year of university. Her sister works as a seamstress in a shop and earns 200,000 kyat (approx.200 USD) per month. Their parents and their eldest sister are rice farmers in Rakhine State. Every year, they sell half of their harvest to earn an income. Htay’s sister in Yangon sends their parents money occasionally, while their parents support Htay’s medical expenses. The income that Khin Htay’s sister earns is enough to cover their daily expenses and pay for basic health care.

In 2018, Khin Htay started to feel very tired and could not sleep well at night. She also experienced chest pains if she walked anywhere far. She took traditional medicine which helped her feel and sleep better. However, she continued to feel tired and experience pain. One day in 2019, a neighbor who has a heart condition, told her that she could have a heart disease like her; the neighbor had also experienced the same symptoms. The neighbor advised her to seek treatment at Pinlon Hospital in Yangon, where the neighbor had undergone heart surgery. She decided to follow the neighbor’s recommendation and also moved in with her sister in Yangon for extra support.

In December 2019, Khin Htay went to Pinlon Hospital to see a cardiologist. After receiving an echocardiogram (echo), the doctor told her that two valves in her heart no longer work and that she would need to receive surgery to replace those valves. The doctor also told her that because her condition is not severe, she did not need surgery yet. She received six month’s worth of medication and a follow-up appointment for June 17th, 2020.

When she came back for her appointment, she received another echo and an x-ray. After checking her results, the doctor told her that her condition had progressed and she now needed surgery, which would cost 15,000,000 kyat (approx.15,000 USD). When they learned about the price of the procedure, Khin Htay and her sister lost hope of ever getting Khin Htay treatment; they could not afford to pay such a large sum of money. When she told a nurse at the hospital called Sandar Ko about their financial situation, the nurse told her about an abbot who might be able to help her. The abbot heads Kyaung Gyi Parahita Monastery and is a partner of Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Khin Htay called the abbot and asked for help accessing surgery. The abbot then referred Htay to Watsi’s Medical Partner BCMF for assistance receiving treatment at Pinlon Hospital.

Currently, Khin Htay feels tired and suffers from chest pains when she walks a lot. She cannot sleep very well at night and she feels short of breath at least twice a week. To try and cope with her symptoms mentally, she prays or recites Dhamma. She also tries to help her sister with household chore such as cooking and sweeping. She hopes that she will be able to continue her studies after surgery and she would like to work for the government as a civil servant once she graduates.

Khin Htay shared, “When I graduate, I will work and support my parents because they are getting old and they will not be able to work on the farm in the future.”

Khin Htay is a 26-year-old-Araknese woman who lives with her younger sister in Yangon, Burma. She is in her final year of university. Her si...

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Khin's Timeline

  • August 24, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Khin was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • August 25, 2020
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Khin received treatment at Pinlon Private Hospital in Burma. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 27, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Khin's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 29, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    Khin's treatment was fully funded.

  • February 6, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Khin's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Treatment
Double Valves Replacement (Mitral and Aortic) with Tricuspid
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $6,378 for Khin's treatment
Subsidies fund $4,878 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$2,200
Medical Staff
$1,066
Medication
$0
Supplies
$2,600
Labs
$100
Radiology
$15
Other
$397
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Patients cannot afford to go to the hospital. Many people rely on medications provided by dealers who are not authorized pharmacists.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Damaged valves are repaired and replaced during open heart surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mercy

Mercy is a 28-year-old subsistence farmer from Malawi. She lives in a grass-thatched house with her husband and their three children. Her oldest child is nine years old and attends school, while her youngest is five years old. She and her husband also take care of her 93-year-old grandmother who depends on them. Mercy and her husband farm together and their farm produces enough food to feed the family, but not enough to sell a surplus. To supplement their income, she and her husband also work on other people's farms. In 2018, Mercy noticed a small lump on the left side of her neck. Over the years, the lump has grown and is hard and painful. After having several appointments rescheduled, Mercy finally got a scan and was referred to a lab for thyroid tests and to a surgeon. The lab tests and transportation costs have greatly impacted her family’s income, and it has taken her three years to have all of the required testing. She was finally diagnosed with an enlarged thyroid and surgery was recommended to heal her condition. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH) is helping Mercy to receive treatment. On September 2nd, she will undergo a thyroidectomy at AMH's care center. Now, she needs help raising $1,015 to fund her procedure and care. Mercy shared, "this condition is not only affecting me, but mainly my helpless 93 years old grandmother and also my family. I can no longer draw water for my grandmother and my children are too young to help. My husband is now getting exhausted combining farm work and household chores. Please assist me with this surgery so I can start helping my family again."

75% funded

75%funded
$763raised
$252to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.