T

Trevor Spiteri

MONTHLY DONOR

Malta

Trevor's Story

Trevor joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Five years ago, Trevor joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Trevor's most recent donation traveled 2,900 miles to support Faith, a four-year-old girl from Kenya, to fund a fracture repair procedure.

Impact

Trevor has funded healthcare for 72 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Trevor

Faith

Faith is a talkative four-year-old girl from Kenya. She is the second born child in a family of three. On December 24th, Faith was brought to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Kapsowar Hospital by her mother. She had a bad fall two days prior while playing with her friends. Faith sustained an injury on her left hand and is unable to flex her elbow. Upon arrival to the hospital, they conducted an x-ray which confirmed that she had a displaced supracondylar fracture. Doctors recommend that her fracture be fixed quickly so as to avoid improper healing. Faith has been admitted in the pediatrics ward and is waiting to undergo a fracture repair procedure. She is currently experiencing pain and discomfort. Though Faith's surgery has been scheduled, her family is still uncertain on how her care will be funded. Faith's father is a small shopkeeper and her mother is a housewife. Her father earns an average of US$52 in a month, and shared that his income is too little to meet all the needs of his children. Their family said it feels impossible to raise funds for Faith’s surgery. They are requesting any well-wisher to support them so that their daughter can have this operation. Fortunately, on December 28th Faith will undergo a type of fracture repair procedure called an open reduction and external fixation. Once recovered, her quality of life will significantly improve and she be able to use her hand normally again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $801 to fund this procedure. Her mother shared, “Nothing worries me like watching my child cry in pain. It has been a nightmare to me and a difficult time in our family. We are looking forward to seeing her in good spirits again."

100% funded

$801raised
Fully funded
Ma Ni

Ma Ni is a 30-year-old woman from Burma. In her free time, she likes to pray to Buddha. She and her husband work as government officers. Together they earn 414,000 kyat (approx. $414 USD) per month, which is not enough for any safety net after they pay their bills for utilities and other household expenses. One day in July 2019, Ma Ni stood up from her desk at work and had pain in her hip joints. She had to push her hand against her hips to help her walk. She did not think there was anything seriously wrong so she did not seek medical attention. However, two weeks after this incident, when she was going to work, she slipped and fell in front of her house. Right away her hips started to hurt and two weeks later, the pain gradually became severe. Her condition worsened day by day, although she visited several hospitals and had taken medications. Currently, Ma Ni has a lot of pain in her hips. She cannot walk for more than two minutes or the pain becomes unbearable. She does not feel comfortable when she lays down and has problems sleeping from the pain. She also needs help going to the bathroom and taking a shower. Fortunately, Ma Ni learned about Watsi's medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). At BCMF's care center, surgeons can perform a total hip replacement to relieve Ma Ni of her pain and allow her to walk easily. Treatment is scheduled for December 17th, and Ma Ni needs help raising $1,500 to pay for this procedure. Ma Ni said, "I had to send my son to my mother’s place in Mawlamyine and my husband also had to ask for leave. [When fully recovered] I want to take back my son from my mother and send him to school. I will support him in whatever he wants to become when he grows up.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Khin

Khin Htay is a 26-year-old-Araknese woman who lives with her younger sister in Yangon, Burma. She is in her final year of university. Her sister works as a seamstress in a shop and earns 200,000 kyat (approx.200 USD) per month. Their parents and their eldest sister are rice farmers in Rakhine State. Every year, they sell half of their harvest to earn an income. Htay's sister in Yangon sends their parents money occasionally, while their parents support Htay's medical expenses. The income that Khin Htay's sister earns is enough to cover their daily expenses and pay for basic health care. In 2018, Khin Htay started to feel very tired and could not sleep well at night. She also experienced chest pains if she walked anywhere far. She took traditional medicine which helped her feel and sleep better. However, she continued to feel tired and experience pain. One day in 2019, a neighbor who has a heart condition, told her that she could have a heart disease like her; the neighbor had also experienced the same symptoms. The neighbor advised her to seek treatment at Pinlon Hospital in Yangon, where the neighbor had undergone heart surgery. She decided to follow the neighbor's recommendation and also moved in with her sister in Yangon for extra support. In December 2019, Khin Htay went to Pinlon Hospital to see a cardiologist. After receiving an echocardiogram (echo), the doctor told her that two valves in her heart no longer work and that she would need to receive surgery to replace those valves. The doctor also told her that because her condition is not severe, she did not need surgery yet. She received six month's worth of medication and a follow-up appointment for June 17th, 2020. When she came back for her appointment, she received another echo and an x-ray. After checking her results, the doctor told her that her condition had progressed and she now needed surgery, which would cost 15,000,000 kyat (approx.15,000 USD). When they learned about the price of the procedure, Khin Htay and her sister lost hope of ever getting Khin Htay treatment; they could not afford to pay such a large sum of money. When she told a nurse at the hospital called Sandar Ko about their financial situation, the nurse told her about an abbot who might be able to help her. The abbot heads Kyaung Gyi Parahita Monastery and is a partner of Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Khin Htay called the abbot and asked for help accessing surgery. The abbot then referred Htay to Watsi's Medical Partner BCMF for assistance receiving treatment at Pinlon Hospital. Currently, Khin Htay feels tired and suffers from chest pains when she walks a lot. She cannot sleep very well at night and she feels short of breath at least twice a week. To try and cope with her symptoms mentally, she prays or recites Dhamma. She also tries to help her sister with household chore such as cooking and sweeping. She hopes that she will be able to continue her studies after surgery and she would like to work for the government as a civil servant once she graduates. Khin Htay shared, “When I graduate, I will work and support my parents because they are getting old and they will not be able to work on the farm in the future.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Lazaru

Lazaru was diagnosed with an anorectal malformation a day after birth. This is a condition where Lazaru was born without an anal opening. While changing his diapers, his mother noticed that Lazaru had not passed stool since he was born. His abdomen was distended and he was quite irritable. A closer look confirmed that their son lacked an anal opening. This was unheard of and discreetly, his parents rushed him to the nearest hospital. Lazaru was further referred and a colostomy put in place when he was three days old. A second surgery would be needed later on to create an anal opening. The funds they had were exhausted and thus could not afford to pay for the subsequent surgery. A previous Watsi beneficiary from their village advised them to visit BethanyKids Hospital where they could get assistance. With hopes high, they set out. The creation of an anal opening is needed without which, Lazaru risks scarring at the colostomy site due to occasional leakages and infection. Lazaru lives with his parents and elder brother in a one-room traditional house in the Rift Valley region of Kenya. His parents are subsistence farmers and own a few goats. His family was also advised to apply for national health insurance to support future needs, which they did not know was possible. They are appealing for help towards their son’s surgical care. “A friend told us that we would get help from here and we are happy even for the warm reception,” says Lazaru’s mother.

100% funded

$708raised
Fully funded