Joe KingtonMONTHLY DONOR
Joe's Story

Joe joined Watsi on March 12th, 2013. Six years ago, Joe joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Joe's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support Mengsim, a tour guide from Cambodia, to fund arm surgery so he can resume work.

Impact

Joe has funded healthcare for 65 patients in 13 countries.

All patients funded by Joe

Benard is a 35-year-old man from Kiambu County in Kenya. He works as a laborer, off-loading trucks carrying construction materials. His wife is a housemaker and together they have three children aged 10 years, 9 years and 3 months old. In December 2020, Benard slipped and fell from a raised water tank he was inspecting, fracturing his right tibia and fibula. He was taken to a clinic in the neighbourhood, where first aid was administered. Afterwards, Benard went to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Nazareth Hospital for an x-ray, which confirmed a fracture of his right tibia and fibula close to his ankle joint. Surgeons recommend he undergoes a fracture repair surgery. If not treated, Benard’s fracture could heal while misaligned or be malunited, resulting in limited use of his right limb, deformity, and infection. However, this procedure is costly for Benard and his family. He is the sole breadwinner of the family, and does not have savings to pay for his care. He appeals for financial support. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 5th, Benard will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. The surgery will ease his pain, allow him to recover, and help him to be able to walk with ease again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. Benard shared, “My head is spinning because I do not know what would happen to my family if I was unable to go to work due to my injury. I would really appreciate help with the surgery so that I can continue providing for my family.”

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Su is 14-year-old girl from Thailand. She lives with her parents in a village in Take Province, Thailand. After Su completed grade five she was unable to continue her schooling since there are no middle or high schools in their area and her parents could not afford to send her to school in nearby Burma. Today she and her parents are agricultural day laborers, each earning 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day. In the past, they used to have enough work but for the past four months they are not able to work as much as they would like to. Due to COVID-19 restrictions on the number of people who can gather, employers are only able to hire five to seven workers in a day. To ensure that everyone has a chance to work in their community, all the day laborers take turns working in a week. Around April or May 2020, Su noticed that she was not feeling well. When she explained how she felt to her mother, she was reassured that this was normal. However, around September 15th, Su started to suffer from terrible lower back and abdominal pain. When she went to Mae Tao Clinic she received an ultrasound which indicated a mass in her uterus. She was then referred to Mae Sot Hospital where she received another ultrasound and physical examination. The doctor then confirmed there was a growing mass in her uterus. The doctor told her they will be able to remove the mass with surgery. Su sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. She is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on October 1st and is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once she recovers, Su hopes to help her parents out financially. “I will go back to work with my mother and I will save money,” she said. “I will build my parents a new house on our land in Burma. I will also learn to sew and do that [becoming a seamstress] for the rest of my life in my own shop."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Khin Htay is a 26-year-old-Araknese woman who lives with her younger sister in Yangon, Burma. She is in her final year of university. Her sister works as a seamstress in a shop and earns 200,000 kyat (approx.200 USD) per month. Their parents and their eldest sister are rice farmers in Rakhine State. Every year, they sell half of their harvest to earn an income. Htay's sister in Yangon sends their parents money occasionally, while their parents support Htay's medical expenses. The income that Khin Htay's sister earns is enough to cover their daily expenses and pay for basic health care. In 2018, Khin Htay started to feel very tired and could not sleep well at night. She also experienced chest pains if she walked anywhere far. She took traditional medicine which helped her feel and sleep better. However, she continued to feel tired and experience pain. One day in 2019, a neighbor who has a heart condition, told her that she could have a heart disease like her; the neighbor had also experienced the same symptoms. The neighbor advised her to seek treatment at Pinlon Hospital in Yangon, where the neighbor had undergone heart surgery. She decided to follow the neighbor's recommendation and also moved in with her sister in Yangon for extra support. In December 2019, Khin Htay went to Pinlon Hospital to see a cardiologist. After receiving an echocardiogram (echo), the doctor told her that two valves in her heart no longer work and that she would need to receive surgery to replace those valves. The doctor also told her that because her condition is not severe, she did not need surgery yet. She received six month's worth of medication and a follow-up appointment for June 17th, 2020. When she came back for her appointment, she received another echo and an x-ray. After checking her results, the doctor told her that her condition had progressed and she now needed surgery, which would cost 15,000,000 kyat (approx.15,000 USD). When they learned about the price of the procedure, Khin Htay and her sister lost hope of ever getting Khin Htay treatment; they could not afford to pay such a large sum of money. When she told a nurse at the hospital called Sandar Ko about their financial situation, the nurse told her about an abbot who might be able to help her. The abbot heads Kyaung Gyi Parahita Monastery and is a partner of Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Khin Htay called the abbot and asked for help accessing surgery. The abbot then referred Htay to Watsi's Medical Partner BCMF for assistance receiving treatment at Pinlon Hospital. Currently, Khin Htay feels tired and suffers from chest pains when she walks a lot. She cannot sleep very well at night and she feels short of breath at least twice a week. To try and cope with her symptoms mentally, she prays or recites Dhamma. She also tries to help her sister with household chore such as cooking and sweeping. She hopes that she will be able to continue her studies after surgery and she would like to work for the government as a civil servant once she graduates. Khin Htay shared, “When I graduate, I will work and support my parents because they are getting old and they will not be able to work on the farm in the future.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded