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Success! Mu from Burma raised $1,500 to fund an amputation.

Mu
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Mu's treatment was fully funded on January 8, 2018.

Photo of Mu post-operation

November 3, 2017

Mu underwent an amputation.

Before the operation, Mu experienced aching pain in her hand, and she could not grip anything. After the operation, she feels much better. She is no longer experiencing those symptoms, and her hand is no longer swollen. Mu’s plan now is to care for her two grandchildren, who are students.

Mu said, “I am very thankful for the donors, because I had no money or other options. I know that without the donors I would not have been able to receive this surgery.”

She added, “I want to spend the rest of my life surrounded by my family and giving myself to charity work.”

Before the operation, Mu experienced aching pain in her hand, and she could not grip anything. After the operation, she feels much better. S...

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August 3, 2017

Mu is 68 years old and lives with her family in a village in Burma. She does not work anymore and relies on her two children to provide for her.

About a month ago, Mu’s finger started to itch, and she developed bullae, a fluid-filled sac. That turned into an ulcer, and the bones of her ring finger were exposed more and more. On July 25, half her ring finger was amputated, but the ulcer continued causing her finger to deteriorate.

On August 3, Mu will undergo treatment to amputate the rest of her ring finger and possibly its nearest finger. For the treatment, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, requests $1,500 to help cover some of the costs.

Mu says, “I hope to get well soon again so that I can continue a life of devotion and rest.”

Mu is 68 years old and lives with her family in a village in Burma. She does not work anymore and relies on her two children to provide for ...

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Mu's Timeline

  • August 3, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Mu was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • August 03, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Mu received treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 28, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Mu's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 03, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Mu's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • January 08, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Mu's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 29 donors

Treatment
Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,397 for Mu's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,897 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,558
Medical Staff
$108
Medication
$2
Supplies
$158
Travel
$16
Labs
$20
Radiology
$5
Other
$530
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Diagnosis involves broken bones, pain, and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Broken bones lead to decreased mobility. Patients are unable to do their normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in remote areas try to fix the broken legs/arms by themselves. People go to spiritual healers or traditional massagers for healing. Sometimes the broken bone heals, but not in the correct position.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor then decides on surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time, especially for bones. When the bones have completely healed, patients will be able to get back to their normal activities without pain and/or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks include allergic response, infection, malignancy (very rare), osteoporosis, and migration.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Since most of our medical partner's patients come from remote areas of Burma, the treatment is not easily accessible, as it is only available in big cities like Rangoon. Patients cannot afford the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None. If the broken bones are not fixed, patients will have to spend their lives in pain. If the swelling turns out to be malignant then it will spread faster, costing the patient’s life.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.