S

srinivasan sreenivasan

MONTHLY DONOR

United States

srinivasan's Story

srinivasan joined Watsi on April 23rd, 2015. Six years ago, srinivasan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. srinivasan's most recent donation traveled 8,800 miles to support San, an elderly farmer from Cambodia, to fund cataract surgery on her left eye.

Impact

srinivasan has funded healthcare for 77 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by srinivasan

Daw Mya

Daw Mya is a 59-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her daughter, granddaughter, son, daughter-in-law, and grandson in Yangon, Burma. Daw Mya is currently too ill to work, but her daughter works as a seamstress in a factory. Her granddaughter goes to school, her son is a taxi driver, her daughter-in-law looks after their son at home. Her daughter and her son both help look after Daw Mya and try to support her as best they can. Daw Mya was diagnosed with a heart condition that involves a malformation of the mitral valve, the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle. This valve controls the flow of blood, but certain conditions may cause blood to flow backward or the valve to narrow. Currently, Daw Mya feels tired and experiences heart palpitations with chest pain. She has no appetite and cannot sleep well at night, and both of her legs are swollen. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund a mitral valve replacement for Daw Mya. The treatment is scheduled to take place on February 21st and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably. Daw Mya said, “I want to get better soon so that I can help my family. I want to help them because my daughter-in-law is always looking after me and her child [my grandson], so she cannot work. If I can look after the household chores and take care of the family, they can go to work and earn more income for our family. I cannot go anywhere because of my condition. They always take care of me and they spend too much of their money on me.”

73% funded

73%funded
$1,109raised
$391to go
Khaing

Khaing is a 27-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her husband and a three-year-old son in a village in Tak Province. Originally from Karen State, Burma, they moved to their current home three years ago in search of better job opportunities. Her husband is a day laborer and she is homemaker. Ten years ago, Khaing started feeling like her nose was blocked and that she could not breathe well. She also had a runny nose and saw a small mass in her nostril while looking at her reflection in the mirror. At the time, Khaing did not go to see a doctor because she could not afford to pay for treatment, and she thought that she would feel better over time. However, four years ago she noticed that the mass had grown. Khaing went to her local hospital in Burma, where the doctor confirmed she had a mass in her nostril and gave her medication for a week. She did not go back to her follow-up appointment as she had run out of money. She then tried to treat herself with traditional medicine unsuccessfully as the mass continued to increase in size. In the beginning of May 2020, Khaing developed a severe headache and pain in her nose. The area around her nose also became swollen. She went to Mae Tao Clinic for treatment, where the medic found large masses in both of her nasal cavities. She was then taken to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. At MSH, she received an x-ray of her nose and the doctor told her that the masses were large and surrounded by a lot of pus. After a CT scan, the doctor diagnosed her with a nasal polyp and scheduled her for surgery on December 28th, 2020. Currently, the area around her nose is swollen and painful. Her nostrils feel itchy, her nose is blocked, and has to breathe through her mouth. She still has a headache, though since she received pain medication from the doctor at MSH, this has been less severe. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 28th, Khaing will undergo an endoscopic sinus surgery. Once recovered, she will be able to breathe normally again and her quality of life will significantly improve. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Khaing shared, "I really want to have surgery and feel better. I am not scared because I believe that the surgery will help me be free from headaches and breathe well again."

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Josphat

Josphat is a baby boy from Kenya. Josphat was born with an anorectal malformation, which caused him to not be able to pass stool at all. Eager to see their third-born child treated, his parents immediately came to Kijabe Hospital. The physicians reviewed him and recommended him to first go through a colostomy, which is a procedure where the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. Though they were not able to source funds for the surgery initially, a member of parliament ended up funding the entire procedure. Next, for the second surgery, a PSARP was performed with the support of Watsi donors. Josphat has successfully recovered from this surgery and is now scheduled for his third and final surgery. This surgery entails closure of the colostomy, enabling Josphat to pass stool normally and preventing future complications. Josphat’s father is a gardener in different people’s homes, and his mother is not working because she provides care for Josphat as he recovers. With no other source of income, Josphat’s parents are not able to raise extra money to pay for his surgery and are requesting financial help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $650 to cover the cost of a colostomy closure for Josphat. The surgery is scheduled to take place on October 19th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Josphat’s mother shared with gratitude, “Having received help from this program before, I am again requesting for your financial support for my son and his health.”

100% funded

$650raised
Fully funded
Tone

Tone is a 22-year-old agricultural day laborer in Thailand. He lives with his friend on his employer's land and he earns 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day from his work. He also supports his parents and four younger siblings who live in a refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border. In his free time Tone likes to watch cartoons and comedy soap operas on his phone. On the evening of 15 April 2020, Tone and his friend were preparing to go hunting after work. After he loaded his pellet gun, Tone placed it upright on the ground, propped against the wall of his hut. Since the hut’s wall is not stable, the gun fell down and went off, shooting Tone's left shin in the process. When Tone received an x-ray at the hospital, he learned that the pellet had fractured both bones in his lower left leg. Since his accident, Tone has been unable to work and support his family. He suffers from pain around the site of his injury, especially when that area is touched or pressure is applied to his leg. His lower left leg has not healed properly and he needs to use crutches to get around. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Tone will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for September 22nd and will cost $1,500. This treatment will allow Tone to regain mobility in his left leg. He will also no longer suffer from pain and he will be able to eventually return to work and continue to support his family. Tone said, “When I was injured, there were travel restrictions [in Thailand] due to the Covid-19 pandemic. I’m lucky that the traditional healer said Mantras over me, otherwise my leg would be rotten and in need of amputation already.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded