Klara MoldovaMONTHLY DONOR
Klara's Story

Klara joined Watsi on November 26th, 2016. Five years ago, Klara joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Klara's most recent donation traveled 4,100 miles to support Emanuel, a teenager from Tanzania, to fund clubfoot surgery so he can walk without difficulty.

Impact

Klara has funded healthcare for 69 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Klara

Pai is a 63-year-old woman who lives alone in a refugee camp in the border region of Thailand and Burma. She receives 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) each month on a cash card from The Border Consortium, to purchase food in the refugee camp. This support is just enough to cover her daily needs, since she sometimes shares meals with her sister. In June 2019, Pai first notice that the vision in both of her eyes was blurry. By late 2021, she could no longer see with her left eye. She then went to the hospital in the refugee camp, run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC). A medic checked her eyes, gave her some eyedrops, and told her that they would refer her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further follow up. IRC staff brought Pai to the hospital in January where the doctor completed a vision test and also checked her eyes with specialized equipment. The doctor diagnosed her with cataracts and shared that she would need surgery to be able to see clearly again. Currently, Pai can only see objects near to her with her right eye and even then, she cannot see objects clearly. She can only perceive light with her left eye. When she walks, she has to do so slowly to avoid stubbing her toes on stones and other objects. At night, she now needs someone to assist her to get around at all. She also has difficulty cleaning her house and doing other household chores like washing her clothes or cooking. She shared that when she tries to cook on her own, she will sometimes mixed up the ingredients now. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Pai. On February 22nd, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Pai's natural lens and replace this with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Pai said, “I do not want to depend on my sister as she has to look after her family too. However, now I have to depend on her for many things and I feel sad about this.” Pai is thankful to the donors who can help pay for her treatment cost. She is very happy that there will be a donor for her. She said, “I hope that I can see again, and I really want to see the donors and everyone at BCMF’s organisation who was willing to help me. Thank you so much for your kind support.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Salomy is a sixty-two-year-old farmer, a mother of 6 (3 boys and 3 girls), and a wife to a loving husband who had a stroke in 2010. Salomy is a very responsible woman and able to take care of the family including her grandchildren through small-scale farming and business. She sells Irish potatoes the she grows on her family farm in Malawi. She owns a big farm and used to make lots of produce; unfortunately the productivity has now gone down as she is unable to work or supervise the farm work due to her current health condition. Eight years ago Salomy developed a swelling in the neck and she assumed it would go away with time. When she noticed that the swelling was still growing, she started visiting the nearest health center. At that point then she was able to continue working in her field and do her business as usual. For the past 2 years however, the condition has destabilized her normal life since she cannot breathe properly and she cannot walk a long distance to buy the products she needs to sell. This has been a very challenging part as a breadwinner to sustain the home and provide the required support to her sick husband. Salomy visited a number of hospitals but had no chance to meet a surgeon to discuss how her problem will be solved. A month ago she was talking to a friend who partially knows about Partners in Hope and she asked a relative from Lilongwe to enquire for her. She learned that she could be able to meet the surgeon and traveled all the way from Mzimba to Lilongwe where she is now temporarily lodging at her distant relative’s home just to have her surgery. She met the surgeon who made a diagnosis of goiter and recommended surgical removal of the goiter in a procedure called thyroidectomy. Goiter is an abnormal enlargement of the thyroid gland on the front and sides of the neck. Thyroidectomy, on the other hand, is the surgical removal of the enlarged thyroid gland as treatment for the goiter. Salomy is unable to meet the whole cost of surgery due to her multiple responsibilities and she has no medical insurance. She believes the surgical operation will give her peace of mind, the symptoms will go away and she will continue providing her best support to her family and especially her husband who is unable to do most of the things by himself. The surgery will restore Salomy’s multiple abilities as the main pillar of the family. Salomy says, "My main fear is the responsibilities that I carry as a farmer, a breadwinner, a mother, a wife, and a grandmother. If I go unassisted all these important roles will suffer. When successful, the surgery will not only benefit me but mostly the whole family that I care for."

$1,015raised
Fully funded

Moses is a young boy and the third born in a family of four children. His parents separated when he was still small. More than two years ago, his mother went to visit one of his grandmothers with his siblings and abandoned them there. With four children to take care of at her age, it became impossible for the grandmother and so she reached out for help from other relatives who were willing to help financially. One of his grandmothers opted to take care of Moses and he has been living with her since then. A few months ago, Moses learnt from his friends that he did not have testes as the other boys his age did. He shared it with his grandmother who took him to the hospital for the doctor’s advice. Moses was examined and diagnosed with bilateral undescended testes and he was referred to another facility for treatment. His grandmother did not have enough funds at the time and so she gathered some funds and a few weeks later she took Moses to the facility. He was examined again, some tests were done but he was not booked for any surgery. Time went by and his grandmother became very concerned. She consulted from one of her children and she was referred to BethanyKids Hospital where Moses has now been booked for bilateral orchidopexy surgery. Moses’ grandmother cannot raise the required money for the surgery and is requesting financial help. Moses was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Moses has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Moses will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 21st. AMHF is requesting $646 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Moses’ grandmother says, “As a child, Moses has gone through a lot and I would like to make his life as smooth as possible but the main hindrance is finances. Please help us.”

$646raised
Fully funded

Fred is a motorbike delivery man from Kenya. He is the last born in a family of five. Fred recently got a job in Nairobi making deliveries using a motorbike. He has only been working for two months at his job. On average, he can make $4 a day. The single young man lives in an apartment costing $30 a month. He does not have active medical insurance coverage do to the cost. His parents are small-scale farmers who grow food crops for home-use on their half an acre piece of land in Kisii. Fred's parents rely on him for upkeep and income since not all his siblings have jobs. To save money, he had travelled to his ancestral home in Kisii (about 500 km from Nairobi) to visit his elderly parents using his work motorbike. He was involved in an accident along Maai Maihiu road while going back to Nairobi. A personal car was on the wrong side of the narrow road and unfortunately hit him. He was rushed to Kijabe Hospital as an emergency case and admitted right away. X-rays revealed that he has a midshaft fracture femur, distal fibular fracture, ulna styloid fracture, Scaphoid fracture, and fracture of his finger.. The Orthopedic team has recommended right femur and right distal tibia fracture repair surgery. He is currently unable to walk or use his right leg and arm. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 25th, Fred will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. He will be able to walk again and use his arm again Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Fred says, “I am young and have a life to lead, I cannot lose my leg. I recently started working with high hopes for my future and supporting my elderly parents. I also promised my brother to pay for his college fees. Sadly, I now cannot walk or use my legs”.

$1,500raised
Fully funded