Burma

Showing all patients at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital

Thein lives with his mother and two younger brothers in Karen State, Burma. He and his brothers are day labourers but Thein stopped working in August 2021 after he injured his right foot. In his free time, he likes to clean their house. In August 2021, Thein was cleaning a fishpond as part of his work when he injured his right foot. At home, the area around his right instep was itchy, and he scratched his foot throughout the evening. When he woke up the next day, he saw a small blister where he had scratched his instep, which became swollen and itchier. He went to two different clinics, but the oral medications and the injections he received never helped. At the third clinic he went to, the doctor applied an ointment to his right instep, which was turning black, and told him they would have to amputate his foot if the ointment did not work. Luckily, their neighbour referred Thein just in time to Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) for assistance accessing further treatment. After BCMF referred Thein to Mawlayine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), he received surgery to remove necrotic tissue from his wound on 14 September 2021. However, two days after his surgery, the doctor checked his foot and saw that his foot was not healing, with new necrotic tissue. As Thein is still in a lot of pain despite taking painkillers, the doctor has decided that they will have to amputate his right leg below his knee on 21 September 2021. Currently, Thein's right foot is still swollen and painful. Due to the pain, he cannot sleep well and has little appetite, spending most of his day trying to sleep. Thein said, "I am so worried and scared to have my right foot amputated but the doctor told me that this is the only option left so that I can recover and be free from the pain. I have a friend whose foot was also amputated and when I told him about my condition, they encouraged me and told me that even though our feet are amputated, we can still do many things with an artificial foot. He told me not to worry. I feel better and stronger after I talked to him. I have told the doctor to go though with the amputation."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Zin Oo is a 36-year-old man who lives with his mother, younger sister, and his seven-year-old son in Mawlamyine, Burma. He is an assistant truck driver and he earns 4,000 kyat (approx. 4 USD) per day. Since the outbreak of CVOID-19, there is less work and he is only able to earn 64,000 kyat (approx. 64 USD) in a month. Zin Oo's son goes to primary school and his wife passed away last year. His mother goes house to house to see if anyone would hire her to wash their clothes. His younger sister lost her job at the factory after the outbreak of COVID-19 in Yangon. Since April, she looks after the household chores and she also works as a day laborer when she can find work. Zin Oo’s combined household income of 124,000 kyat (approx. 150 USD) in a month is just enough for their daily expenses and they cannot afford to pay the costs of basic healthcare. On August 3rd, Zin Oo was cutting firewood with an axe. While cutting the logs, his aim was off and he hit his fingers on his right hand against the log. His fingers became swollen and red after the accident, especially his small and index fingers. Without enough money to go to the hospital, Zin Oo bought traditional medicine and applied it to his fingers. He felt like his middle and ring fingers healed but his small and index fingers became more swollen and painful. Eventually when he noticed pus on his fingers, he told his friend about his problem and his friend suggested he go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), where treatment often cost less than other hospitals. At MLCH, the doctor completed a detailed assessment of his right hand and diagnosed him with cellulitis, a serious bacterial skin infection. The doctor told him that because of poor blood supply, he would need to amputate his small finger and probably his index finger as well. When Zin Oo told the doctor that he does not have any money to pay for the surgery, the doctor referred him to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) for assistance accessing treatment. Currently, the fingers on Zin Oo’s right hand are red, swollen, and warm to the touch. His fingers hurt a lot, especially his small and index finger. He cannot sleep at night without taking pain medication. He is not able to eat food with his right hand and he feels uncomfortable eating with his left hand since he is right-handed. Aside from this, Zin Oo feels stressed about his condition. He cannot work and his mother has to help look after him since he was admitted at the hospital. His mother then has no income while he receives treatment. They are worried that they will not have enough money for food and for Zin Oo’s treatment. In the future, Zin Oo wants to work as a truck driver to earn money for his family. Once he has fully recovered, he will accept any work he can find as he looks for a job as a truck driver. Zin Oo’s younger sister shared with us, “Now, I have to take care of my nephew while my mother accompanies my brother [Zin Oo] at the hospital. I cannot work and our family is worried about money. We owe our neighbor 50,000 kyat [approx. 50 USD] and we have to pay it back with 20% interest.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Kyaw is a 43-year-old man who lives in a village in Burma. Kyaw works as a motorbike taxi driver in his village. He is the sole provider for both his 17-year-old daughter and 16-year-old son. In August 2016, he was visiting his sister’s village for a wedding during the rainy season and fell while he was walking. He twisted his ankle and hurt the toes on his right foot. At the time, he did not think that it was a serious injury and never consulted a doctor. However, the pain in his foot increased, and he finally went to a clinic near his village, where the medics practiced traditional medicine. The medicine seemed to help his condition at first, but they proved ineffective over time. Kyaw finds it difficult to work as his condition continues to worsen. Kyaw's foot has become red and swollen and has caused him to walk with a limp. By February 2017, Kyaw’s two toes on his right foot had become black and ulcerated. His sister learned of his condition and insisted he seek treatment. Physicians have diagnosed him with gangrene, a condition in which body tissue dies. Gangrene can be caused by illness, injury, or infection, and it causes a loss of blood supply to surrounding tissue. If left untreated, it can spread, leading to further damage. On April 4, Kyaw is scheduled to have his foot amputated to prevent further spreading of the disease. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund his procedure. Though Kyaw is nervous for his procedure, he keeps his children's well-being in mind. He says, “Even if I lose my foot, I would like to get a prosthesis and return to work. I do not like taking money from my children.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded