Bingen EguzkitzaUNIVERSAL FUND MEMBER
Bingen's Story

Bingen joined Watsi on November 13th, 2015. Eight years ago, Bingen joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Bingen's most recent donation supported Gebra, a 10-year-old from Tanzania, to fund mass removal surgery.

Impact

Bingen has funded healthcare for 94 patients in 12 countries.

Patients funded by Bingen

Oliver is a married mother of four children, all of whom are married with children except the last one who is still in school. She is a farmer together with her husband. Her second child, a daughter, has been there for her support throughout her illness. Oliver likes chatting with her daughter and enjoys eating nsima made from cassava maize flour served with fresh fish. Oliver was well until one year ago when she noted a small lump on her right breast that was not painful. She visited her nearest hospital where some pain medication was provided. She visited many other hospitals after noting that the growth was becoming bigger as time passed. At one of the hospitals, a diagnosis of suspected breast cancer was made before proceeding to Kamuzu Central Hospital for further assessments. At Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH), different tests were done, and a diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma was made followed by four cycles of neoadjuvant therapy. Oliver was later scheduled for surgery on January 15th this year but unfortunately, she did not report back since she did not have the funds. On January 29th, Oliver went back to KCH where she was referred to our medical partner's care center Partners in Hope Medical Center (PIH) so that she can undergo surgery more urgently. Of late, Oliver has been experiencing needle pricking pains, and weakness affecting her farm work plus household chores as a mother. On January 30th, Oliver reported to PIH and met the surgeon who confirmed the need for a modified radical mastectomy. Modified radical mastectomy is the removal of the entire breast, including the nipple, areola, and skin plus most axillary lymph nodes. Oliver believes the surgical operation will help her get back home in a good condition and enable her to resume her farm work. Oliver said, “Kindly remove this breast for me to have my peace of mind after getting rid of these bad symptoms that I experience, I would rather be able to move on in my age.”

$1,194raised
Fully funded

Kyu is a 43-year-old teacher from Burma. She lives with her mother, husband, and two sons in Yangon Division, Burma. Kyu’s mother is retired, and her two sons are students. Kyu’s husband works as a motorcycle taxi driver. Kyu is a high school teacher who conducts classes from her home. Their combined monthly income is sufficient to cover their basic living expenses but they are not able to save money. When they have health issues, they rely on a nearby clinic for medical attention. In her free time, she enjoys reading books and she'd like to be able to continue teaching her students at home once she feels better. Kyu was born with an atrial septal defect (ASD), a condition in which a hole exists between the two upper chambers of the heart. Sometimes ASDs may close on their own during development, but sometimes this condition requires surgery to repair the hole and prevent long-term damage to the heart and lungs. Kyu is scheduled to undergo heart surgery on February 4th to correct the atrial septal defect and improve her quality of life. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to support the cost of Kyu's procedure and care. Kyu said “Since my heart condition worsened, I couldn’t teach my students due to my fatigue. Now I felt very happy when I learned that the BCMF organisation would support my surgery. Without the help of these donors, I couldn’t afford the treatment. I would like to be thankful to all donors and BCMF for supporting my surgery.”

$935raised
$565to go

Devie is a 31-year old woman from the Philippines. She has three children that she loves and supports alongside her partner. In 2018, Devie began to experience troubling symptoms, including discomfort in her neck, shortness of breath, easy fatigability, palpitations, and difficulty swallowing. Unfortunately, due to financial constraints, she couldn't seek medical consultation. Due to her condition, she cannot work. As time went on, Devie's condition worsened, and in 2019 she noticed a visible lump on her neck. This made it even more challenging for her to carry out her daily tasks. Devie traveled to Our Lady of Peace Hospital, where she underwent a thorough examination. She was diagnosed with Colloid Adenomatous Goiter, a thyroid gland disorder characterized by the development of multiple nodules or lumps within the thyroid tissue. These nodules are made up of abnormal thyroid cells that form small, fluid-filled sacs called colloid cysts. She needs surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. Fortunately, our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP), is helping Devie receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a thyroidectomy on July 22nd at Our Lady of Peace Hospital. Surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. The Philippine Health Insurance Corporation is covering a portion of the cost of Devie's treatment, and WSFP is raising the remaining $935. Devie shared, "I am grateful to Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines because I have been enduring this illness for a long time, waiting for someone to help and for something to happen, and they are my answered prayer. Please never get tired of helping less fortunate people like me."

$935raised
Fully funded

Naw Aye is a 28-year-old woman who lives with her husband, son, sister-in-law, brother, two nephews, and two nieces in a refugee camp in Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand. Originally from across the Burmese border in a conflict-area called Karen State, she fled to the refugee camp with her family in February 2023 due to airstrikes on her village. Her husband and her brother are unemployed, while her son, nieces, and nephews go to school. She and her sister-in-law are homemakers. During her free time, she loves to play with her son and enjoys planting vegetables in her small garden. She is currently expecting her second child. Her doctors recommended that she deliver via cesarean section because In January 2020, when Naw Aye was pregnant with her first child, her water broke prematurely which put her baby's life at risk. She was brought to a hospital in Burma, where she gave birth to her son through a caesarean section (C-section). In February, after they had fled to the refugee camp, Naw Aye became pregnant. She went to the hospital in the refugee camp regularly for antenatal care. She was told during one of her visits that although her pregnancy was going well, she would need to give birth through a C-section to ensure the safety of both mother and child. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, will help ensure a safe C-section on November 3rd. This procedure costs $1500, and Naw Aye needs your support. “I want to sell sacks or Mohinga (Burmese soup) for extra income soon. But I don’t have enough cash to start doing that, and I am pregnant. I hope I can do that after I give birth,” Naw Aye said.

$1,500raised
Fully funded