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Success! Wilson from Kenya raised $1,097 to fund spina bifida surgery.

Wilson
100%
  • $1,097 raised, $0 to go
$1,097
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Wilson's treatment was fully funded on January 8, 2018.

Photo of Wilson post-operation

December 11, 2017

Wilson underwent spina bifida surgery.

Wilson’s surgery to repair the open spine defect was successful. This has highly minimized his risk of developing tethered cord syndrome, paralysis of the lower limbs, or infection.

“I appreciate Watsi for help accorded towards my son’s treatment,” says Wilson’s mother.

Wilson’s surgery to repair the open spine defect was successful. This has highly minimized his risk of developing tethered cord syndrome, pa...

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October 18, 2017

Wilson is a happy and active five-month-old boy who often pulls at his mother in order to get her attention. He lives with his parents and grandparents in Eastern Kenya. They are subsistence farmers and have no cash income.

Wilson was diagnosed with spina bifida at birth. Spina bifida is a condition in which the spinal cord does not close all the way, causing cerebrospinal fluid to emerge in a pouch-like fashion from the back along the spine. If left untreated, this condition will put Wilson at risk for serious infection and hydrocephalus, and potentially prevent him from learning to walk. Surgery has been recommended.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,097 to fund Wilson’s surgery. He is scheduled for treatment on October 19 at our medical partner’s care center, BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital. After treatment, he will be able to grow and develop normally.

“I would wish to see my son well and thriving,” Wilson’s mother says.

Wilson is a happy and active five-month-old boy who often pulls at his mother in order to get her attention. He lives with his parents and g...

Read more

Wilson's Timeline

  • October 18, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Wilson was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • October 19, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Wilson's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 23, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Wilson received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 11, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Wilson's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • January 8, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Wilson's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 32 donors

Treatment
Spina Bifida Closure
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,097 for Wilson's treatment
Hospital Fees
$889
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$82
Supplies
$0
Labs
$126
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The patient has a mass or lesion on the back that leaks cerebral spinal fluid, which puts him or her at risk of infection.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Spina bifida can cause incontinence, bladder and kidney damage, and paralysis and numbness in the lower limbs, bladder, and sphincter. It can also lead to hydrocephalus as a result of disturbance to the fluid in the brain. Hydrocephalus can lead to cognitive dysfunction, blindness, and death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Spina bifida is more common in developing countries due to improper and inadequate nutrition. Foods containing folic acid are scarce, and food is not fortified. In Kenya, however, the Ministry of Health has recently started a program to give expectant mothers folic acid for free at government facilities.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient's hospital stay ranges from two days to three weeks. The length of stay depends on the healing rate of the wound and will be extended if the patient also undergoes a shunt insertion to treat hydrocephalus. However, shunt insertions are usually performed about one month after this surgery. The patient is continually monitored. If the wound heals and the patient is in a neurologically stable condition, the surgery is considered successful.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Surgery performed within the first days of a child’s life prevents infection and saves the spine and brain from further damage. Early surgery also minimizes the risk of paralysis. Later treatment may save the child's life and prevent further damage.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This surgery is moderately risky, and complications depend on the severity of the case.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition. With about one neurosurgeon per 10,000,000 people in East Africa, initial treatment for spina bifida is often unavailable.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Surgery is the primary option for most types of spina bifida.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Ni

Ni lives with her mother & four siblings in Yangon, Burma. Her two younger sisters work in a clothing factory, while her mother and one brother are homemakers. Her other brother works as a driver assistant. Ni works in a factory that produces alcohol and in her free time, she enjoys watching television with her family. She also enjoys teaching English to their neighbor's children on the weekends. In July 2019, Ni started to experience chest pain and difficulty breathing. She went to a hospital in Yangon and was told she might have a problem with her kidney. When she did not feel any better after taking medication for a month, she went to another hospital in Yangon. She received multiple diagnostic tests and was told that her kidney is healthy but she has a heart condition. After receiving an echocardiogram, she was diagnosed with atrial septal defect (ASD). The doctor told her she would need heart surgery, but Ni told the doctor she could not afford to pay for it. Ni received medication and went back home. Unfortunately, she was unable to go back to the hospital for follow up because the hospital closed after the country's military coup. Due to the deteriorating security condition in their area, Ni’s family decided to go back to their village near Mandalay. Around her village, she could not find a pharmacy that sold her medication. When her family finally traveled back to Yangon she was feeling better and decided not to purchase more of the special medication she needed. Then in January, Ni felt like she could not breathe well, and experienced chest pain and rapid breathing again. She went to a hospital, where the doctor referred her to Pun Hlaing Hospital. After she undergoing more diagnostic tests, the doctor told her she would need to receive surgery costing 9,000,000 kyats (approx. $9,000 USD). When she told the doctor she could not afford to pay for it, the doctor gave her the phone number of a nurse who may be able to help. When Ni called the nurse, the nurse told her about our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) who is now helping Ni access treatment. On March 13th she will undergo cardiac surgery to close the Atrial Septal Defect. Currently, Ni has chest pain and difficulty breathing. Sometimes, she has rapid breathing at night. She cannot sleep well because she is always worried about her condition. Ni shared, "I am very scared to receive surgery but if I do not receive this treatment, I will not live a long life. I am so happy to receive treatment and I would like to say thank you so much to all the donors."

77% funded

77%funded
$1,168raised
$332to go
Ann

Ann is a 45-year-old woman from a remote area in Kiambu County of Kenya. She is married and they have four children. Ann takes care of their house and children without a source of income and her husband works as a driver. What he earns is just enough to cater to their family needs and children's education. Transportation is a great challenge where they live. To come to the hospital today, Ann left her house at 4 a.m. to make it to Nazareth Hospital by the morning time. Since the age of four, Ann started having on-and-off bouts of tonsillitis. Two of her children, as well as other family members, have already undergone tonsillectomy, but she has not yet managed to be healed. Over the past year, she has been repeatedly needing to go to the hospital and has had many injections. She has been experiencing neck pain, swollen and infected tonsils, headaches, and earaches. The ENT surgeon has advised her to have her tonsils removed. Ann’s husband has coverage under a national health insurance plan, but her surgery was not approved for support. Our Medical Partner African Mission Healthcare is now helping to raise $565 to cover her treatment. "Our insurance is currently having issues, but I can’t wait to have the tonsils removed. They have disrupted my normal life and the injections are too many and even more painful than the tonsils. I am pleading for support so that I can get over this problem, to regain my normal life, and take care of my family," said Ann.

26% funded

26%funded
$148raised
$417to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Ni

Ni lives with her mother & four siblings in Yangon, Burma. Her two younger sisters work in a clothing factory, while her mother and one brother are homemakers. Her other brother works as a driver assistant. Ni works in a factory that produces alcohol and in her free time, she enjoys watching television with her family. She also enjoys teaching English to their neighbor's children on the weekends. In July 2019, Ni started to experience chest pain and difficulty breathing. She went to a hospital in Yangon and was told she might have a problem with her kidney. When she did not feel any better after taking medication for a month, she went to another hospital in Yangon. She received multiple diagnostic tests and was told that her kidney is healthy but she has a heart condition. After receiving an echocardiogram, she was diagnosed with atrial septal defect (ASD). The doctor told her she would need heart surgery, but Ni told the doctor she could not afford to pay for it. Ni received medication and went back home. Unfortunately, she was unable to go back to the hospital for follow up because the hospital closed after the country's military coup. Due to the deteriorating security condition in their area, Ni’s family decided to go back to their village near Mandalay. Around her village, she could not find a pharmacy that sold her medication. When her family finally traveled back to Yangon she was feeling better and decided not to purchase more of the special medication she needed. Then in January, Ni felt like she could not breathe well, and experienced chest pain and rapid breathing again. She went to a hospital, where the doctor referred her to Pun Hlaing Hospital. After she undergoing more diagnostic tests, the doctor told her she would need to receive surgery costing 9,000,000 kyats (approx. $9,000 USD). When she told the doctor she could not afford to pay for it, the doctor gave her the phone number of a nurse who may be able to help. When Ni called the nurse, the nurse told her about our medical partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) who is now helping Ni access treatment. On March 13th she will undergo cardiac surgery to close the Atrial Septal Defect. Currently, Ni has chest pain and difficulty breathing. Sometimes, she has rapid breathing at night. She cannot sleep well because she is always worried about her condition. Ni shared, "I am very scared to receive surgery but if I do not receive this treatment, I will not live a long life. I am so happy to receive treatment and I would like to say thank you so much to all the donors."

77% funded

77%funded
$1,168raised
$332to go