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Tina You

MONTHLY DONORSF Native, hoping to help bit by bit.

United States

Tina's Story

Tina joined Watsi on September 19th, 2016. Four years ago, Tina joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Tina's most recent donation traveled 8,700 miles to support Salmani, a 6-month-old baby from Tanzania, to fund hydrocephalus treatment.

Impact

Tina has funded healthcare for 54 patients in 9 countries.

All patients funded by Tina

Salmani

Salmani is a six-month-old baby from Tanzania and the second born in his family. His parents live in Arusha where they are both subsistence farmers. Salmani was born healthy, but at the age of three months, Salmani’s mother observed that his head size looked abnormal. His neck was not as strong as a 3-month-old, and she felt his other body parts were somewhat weak. As a result of his condition, Salmani has been experiencing an increasing head circumference and inability to sit on his own. His mother took him to Mount Meru Hospital and they referred their family to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center ALMC Hospital for treatment. She decided she had to wait to go because they could not afford to proceed with Salmani's treatment, doctor’s visits, or the tests required. Later on, they heard about Watsi's ALMC-The Plaster House program and how children with disabilities are able to be supported. Salmani's parents wish to see him be able to sit, walk one day, and also to see his head size return back to normal. Salmani has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. Without treatment, Salmani will experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Salmani that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 14th and will drain the excess fluid from Salmani's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life. With proper treatment, Salmani will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Salmani’s mother shared, “Please help my son get this treatment so that we can save his life and he can be able to play like other children.”

100% funded

$1,300raised
Fully funded
Brighton

Brighton is three-year-old boy and the youngest in his family of nine children. Brighton is a friendly and playful boy. Brighton's parents have been wanting to enroll him in school and start kindergarten but they are concerned because Brighton's right foot is deformed after being involved in a fire accident two years ago, making walking for him difficult. Brighton was left at home sleeping while his mother went out to fetch water. His older siblings were inside the house playing and one of them took a matchbox and started playing with it. The fire caught the bed in which Brighton was sleeping in. The oldest child seeing the fire ran and called their mother who rushed in to save Brighton. He was saved, though he sustained burns on his right foot and was rushed to the hospital. Thankfully Brighton was treated, his wound healed, and was able to walk. However as time went on the scars around his foot contracted to pull on his toes, deforming his foot and making it difficult for him to walk well. His parents tried to seek treatment for him but the cost turned out to be expensive for them to afford. Both parents are small scale farmers and their income is not enough to support the family and cover Brighton's treatment cost. They are asking for help. Brighton’s mother says, “We would love to see our son’s foot well so that he can be able to walk like other normal children, but the cost of treatment is too high for us to afford. Please help us.”

100% funded

$1,088raised
Fully funded
Joseph

Joseph is a 10-month-old baby boy and the last born in his family to his mother who has eight other children. His father is polygamous with two wives, and the second wife has five children making them a large family of fourteen children. Four children in his family have been able to join school, but the rest have not had a chance to join yet. Joseph's older siblings who do not go to school help their parents look after their herd of five cows and five goats. Both parents depend on small-scale farming of maize, beans and vegetables for their food and are able to sell a goat once in a while to be able to get money to buy other commodities. Joseph was born at home earlier this year with the help of midwives since their nearest local hospital is a long distance from home. At birth , the midwives noticed Joseph had a swell with an open wound along his spine and advised his parents to take Joseph to hospital and seek medical care. They were able to get a small amount of money and took Joseph to a local hospital where he had his wound dressed and were referred to Watsi's Medical Partner ALMC Hospital. At the hospital, Joseph's parents were informed that their son would need to undergo surgery to help correct his Spina Bifida. Without treatment Josep was in danger of getting his spine infected, which could lead to him losing limb movement making him permanently disabled or even lead to death in case of a serious infection. Through Watsi donors' incredible support, Joseph was able to have this life-saving surgery. Unfortunately, he has since acquired hydrocephalus which is putting him in danger of brain damage due to the fluids accumulating in his head, increasing head size and pressure. His parents cannot afford the treatment cost thus they are asking for help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,300 to cover the cost of surgery for Joseph that will treat his hydrocephalus. The procedure is scheduled to take place on October 12th and will drain the excess fluid from Joseph's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve his quality of life now and in the future. With proper treatment, Joseph will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young boy. Joseph’s mother says, “After my son had his first surgery he was so well, but now his head is increasing in size and he is vomiting a lot accompanied with fevers. Please help save my baby.”

100% funded

$1,300raised
Fully funded
Ye

Ye lives with his wife and daughter on the Thai-Burma border. He used to work as a carpenter but had to stop working two years ago when his health deteriorated. His wife is a homemaker and his daughter works as a vendor selling mobile phones. Her monthly income of 10,000 baht (approx. 335 USD) is just enough to cover their family's daily needs. In the beginning of 2018, Ye started to experience swelling in his hands and feet, pain in his lower back, and difficulty passing urine. At first he thought that it was caused by overworking and would disappear over time. Six months later, when he still felt unwell, Ye finally decided to go see a doctor. He went to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) where the doctor conducted tests and concluded that he had high blood pressure. The doctor also sent him to another hospital for an ultrasound because at that time the ultrasound machine was broken at MSH. When Ye returned to MSH with his ultrasound results, the doctor diagnosed him with stones in both of his kidneys. He was told to drink lots of water and was provided with oral medication. When Ye returned for his follow-up appointment, he received another ultrasound and more oral medication. As his condition went on, he received a catheter in both of his kidneys while admitted at the hospital. Ye kept returning regularly for his follow-up appointments. Up until 2020, he had the catheter replaced a number of times and also asked the doctor twice if he could receive surgery. However, both times the doctor told him that he would have to wait because there were too many patients on the waiting list. Eventually in the beginning of 2020, Ye was scheduled to receive surgery. When he was admitted in the middle of March 2020, he first received treatment for a urinary tract infection before he received surgery to remove the stone from his right kidney. After surgery, Ye had difficulty breathing and was placed in the intensive care unit for four days. By the time he was discharged, he was left with a 127,000 baht (approx. 4,233 USD) hospital bill. Ye paid what he could by selling all their jewelry and using up their saving. However, most of his bill was paid by borrowing money from his relatives in Burma. Before he was discharged, the doctor told him that he will need to receive laser treatment to breakup the stone in his left kidney. However, if the procedure was not successful he would need surgery to remove the stone. His daughter was no longer able to pay for his laser treatment so a nurse at MSH told him to ask for help at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC). When Ye went to the clinic and told the medic that they cannot afford to pay for his laser treatment, the medic referred him to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund for assistance accessing further treatment and we now are raising $1500 to support his care. “I am very depressed, and I feel stressed about my health condition. I have used up all my savings for my treatment. Now I have to rely on my daughter’s income and I feel really feel bad as she works hard," said Ye.

83% funded

83%funded
$1,249raised
$251to go
Kyaw

Kyaw is a 37-year-old man who lives with his wife in a village in Tak Province, Thailand. He has two daughters that they support and who live with their maternal aunt in Burma. His wife is an agricultural day laborer while Kyaw has been a homemaker for the past two years. Unfortunately, his wife has been unable to find work for the past two months, due to COVID-19 restrictions. Even when she was working, the income she earned was not enough to cover their basic necessities and sometimes they would have to purchase items from the shop on credit. In 2013, Kyawa was injured in a car accident that took his brother's life. His doctors implanted a steel rod to repair his fractured left leg. He was told that he would need to have the steel removed in three to six years. Recently, Kyaw started experiencing pain in his left leg again. He traveled to Mae Sot Hospital to have the steel removed so that his leg could finish healing properly. Our medical parter, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the cost of his surgery. A surgery that will alleviate his pain and enable him to walk again. Now, we are asking for your help in funding Kyaw's life-changing treatment. Kyaw shared, “I am very upset about my leg. I want to work like other people but because of my condition no one will offer me a job. I'm also worried about my wife and daughters' future. As a father I want to fulfill their needs which I can’t at present. Instead I rely on my wife's income. If the surgery doesn't help to improve my condition, I'm worried that my leg will be amputated. My wife is also worried that my condition will worsen, but she urges me to be strong and accept our fate.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded
Wai

Wai is a 14-year-old student from Thailand. He temporarily lives with his grandparents and great grandmother in Huay Ka Lote Village in Thailand, but Wai usually lives with his parents across the border in Burma. He came to visit his grandparents during his school break in mid-March 2020 after completing seventh grade, however, he was unable to return to his parents and home when Thailand closed it borders due to COVID-19. His parents are subsistence farmers and they also raise a few chickens, pigs, and goats to sustain their livelihood. When they need money to buy clothes or pay for healthcare, they sell some of their livestock. Meanwhile, his grandparents look after a landowner’s garden and land for 2,000 baht (approx. 67 USD) per month. The income that Wai’s grandparents earn from the landowner is just enough for their daily expenses. Wai is diagnosed with cataract and currently he has lost most of the vision in his right eye and is only able to see light. His right eye also looks red. Aside from that, he has no other symptoms and his eye does not hurt. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Wai. On June 16th, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Wai's natural lens and replace it with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, he will be able to see clearly. Now, he needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. “I want to become a farmer when I grow up and follow in my parent’s footsteps, but I also want to become a nurse if I receive a chance to do so. I overheard my parents say that they don’t have enough money to continue supporting my studies once I graduate from grade eight, so I’m not so sure whether I’ll be able to continue my studies after next year,” said Wai.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded