D

Diana Pechter

MONTHLY DONOR

Diana's Story

Diana joined Watsi on August 3rd, 2013. Four years ago, Diana joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Diana's most recent donation supported Zawadi, a friendly girl from Tanzania, to fund burn treatment.

Impact

Diana has funded healthcare for 51 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Diana

Zawadi

Zawadi is an eleven-year-old girl and the firstborn child in a family of three children in Tanzania. She is a friendly and cheerful girl. Zawadi was born healthy but when she was six years old, she was involved in a fire accident that left her with severe burns on her arms, hands, and fingers. On the fateful day, Zawadi and other children were playing cooking games behind their hut. One of the children went and picked a burning piece of wood from the kitchen and was trying to make a fire for them so that they could cook. Zawadi was the one blowing the fire and while doing this her clothes caught fire. She was wearing a sweater and had wrapped herself in Maasai clothing. She was severely burned resulting in five months of hospitalization during her initial treatment. Her wounds healed but have left her unable to straighten her left arm due to the contractures on her axilla. Zawadi has been scheduled for surgery to help release the contracture on her arm so that she is able to wear clothes and make her life a bit easier when trying to use her hands. Her parents are small-scale farmers who have a few cattle that they depend on for milk. Their income is not enough for them to afford Zawadi’s treatment cost and they are asking for help. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Zawadi receive treatment. On October 13th, surgeons at their care center will perform a burn contracture release surgery and skin graft so she will be able to utilize her hand with greater ease. Now, her family needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Zawadi’s father told us, “If my daughter is able to have this surgery she will be able to have more range of motion on her arm making her life easier than now. Please help because we can’t afford the treatment cost.”

47% funded

47%funded
$411raised
$463to go
Khin

Khin is a 39-year-old woman who lives with her family in Hpa-An Township, Karen State, Burma. Both her children are in preschool. She and her husband are subsistence farmers, growing rice during the rainy season on rented land. The rest of the year, her husband collects leaves used to make roofs, works as a daily labourer or collects branches to sell. Khin was born with a scar the size of an ant bite on her upper lip. Her parents thought that it would disappear or heal on its own but the scar developed into a growth and increased in size. Her parents passed away when she was young and after that she went to live with her brother’s family. By the time she was around 20 years old, the growth had become large and soft, covering the area between her upper lips and her nose. When the pain became unbearable in 2005, her uncle dropped her off at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) in Thailand, a free clinic close to where her uncle used to work. At this point, the growth had become so large that dragged her upper lip down and extended into her nostrils. At MTC, she was seen by doctors and medics, before she was diagnosed with a hemangioma. At this point, the growth had worsened, and she was bleeding from her lips. In April 2006, Khin went to Chiang Mai Hospital and had the hemangioma removed surgically. The growth later has returned. Overtime, the hemangioma has increased in size and become hard. It has now expanded into Khin’s nostrils, especially her left nostril, which causes her to have difficulty breathing at times. She feels uncomfortable but is not in pain. Sometimes she also feels like she has a blood clot in her nostrils during her nosebleeds. Because the nosebleed can start at any time and can last anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, her life revolves around managing her nosebleeds. She is unable to work or sleep properly, and if she is about to have a nosebleed, she is unable to eat. The nosebleeds have also affected her ability to earn an income for her children and continues to impact her social life. “When I socialise, I do not feel comfortable and some people think I have a disease that I can infect them with,” said Khin. “So, I hope to get better after surgery, and I hope I will no longer have nosebleeds. I don’t want to bleed, and I want to socialise with my friends and family happily. [Right now] my friends won’t even touch me.”

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded