Ted's Story

Ted joined Watsi on June 27th, 2014. Nine years ago, Ted joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Ted's most recent donation traveled 8,200 miles to support Donnalyn, a 31-year-old factory worker from Philippines, to fund gallbladder removal surgery.

Impact

Ted has funded healthcare for 117 patients in 14 countries.

Patients funded by Ted

Phorp is a 21-year-old rice farmer from Cambodia. He lives at home with his parents and 18-year-old brother. His family also works as rice farmers in Siem Reap province. At home, in his free time, Phorp loves to play volleyball. In August, Phorp was in a motorbike accident and fell on his left shoulder. He sustained multiple injuries, including lacerations and paralysis of his left arm due to nerve damage. He visited the local provincial hospital for stitches for the lacerations, but he did not receive care for the nerve damage. Phorp has been diagnosed with a brachial plexus injury on his left side. The brachial plexus is a nerve network that transmits signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Injuries to this nerve network can result in loss of function and sensation. There has been no improvement in his arm over the last several months. Currently, he cannot use his hand and, consequently, cannot work outside in the rice paddies with his family. Fortunately, Phorp traveled to our medical partner's care center for treatment. This is the only center in the country where this treatment is available. On November 3rd, he will undergo a brachial plexus repair surgery. After recovery, he should be able to use his arm once again. Our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre (CSC), is requesting $709 to fund this procedure. Phorp contributed $100 to his care. Phorp said, "After surgery, I hope that I can lift my shoulder and arm and be able to work."

$709raised
Fully funded

Imani is a 4-year-old boy from Tanzania. His family resides in Karatu, a small district located in the Arusha region. He is the second born among three children. His mother, a farmer, takes care of him and his siblings with the invaluable assistance of his grandfather. He has recently started school and enjoys spending time with his new friends there. His fmaily hopes that he can continue with school and do well there as he grows. One of his favorite activities is his art class, where he already likes to draw and paint. Imani was diagnosed with genu varus, also known as bow legs. This condition may present from infancy through adulthood and has a wide variety of causes including excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. It causes lateral knee thrusting and a waddling gait. It can also impact his hips and ankles as the condition continues to worsen. As a result, he cannot walk and play like his friends and other students. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), was able to create a treatment plan for Imani. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 1st. Treatment will hopefully restore Imani's mobility, allowing him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. AMH is requesting $880 to help fund corrective surgery for Imani. Imani’s mother says: “I wish for my son to be able to walk and play without falling repeatedly. I have high hopes that this treatment will significantly improve his life and bring about positive changes for him.”

$880raised
Fully funded

Three year old Tilian is the youngest of the 12 children in his family. They all live in a remote village in the Kiteto Manyara region of Tanzania. The family resides in a communal boma, consisting of small mud houses, which are just enough to accommodate them all. Tilian's parents are small farmers who depend on agriculture and livestock for sustenance and income. However, their region has been plagued by prolonged dry seasons, leading to the death of cattle and reduced harvests. As the sole provider for the family, the father has been compelled to seek day jobs to support them. Unfortunately, his income falls short of meeting the most basic necessities for their family. In September 2022, while Tilian was playing with his friends, he inadvertently came into contact with a stove, and accidentally knocked over a container of hot water. This resulted in Tilian sustaining severe burns to his arms and chest. His injuries were extensive, and Tilian was brought to the nearest dispensary for immediate first aid and wound care. After the initial treatment, Tilian was discharged and sent home with instructions for caring for the wounds, because the dispensary lacked the resources to continue caring for him. The burns on Tilian's hands took more than two months to heal, while the one on his chest required even more time for proper recovery. In March 2023, Tilian was brought to our medical partner's center. The medical team thoroughly assessed his condition, and told his parents about the availability of visiting doctors who specialize in treating similar cases. Initiating a daily wound care regimen, the medical team began to attend to Tilian’s needs. However, Tilian's father struggled to afford the transportation for multiple trips to the center. As a result, the family had to make the difficult decision to leave Tilian at the facility as a resident, while he underwent his wound care, and awaited treatment at the plastic surgery clinic. During a plastic surgery clinic this month, Tilian was evaluated by visiting surgeons. The proposed course of action is surgery to facilitate the healing of the wound on his chest. Additionally, the doctors will need to address the burn scar contractures that have developed, tightening the skin around his arm. His parents are appealing for help to ensure their son receives the proper and necessary treatment for his wounds. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is helping Tilian receive treatment. On August 15th, surgeons will perform a burn contracture release surgery to enable him to use his hand with ease. With continued care, the wound on his chest will heal completely, preventing any further risk of infection, and allowing Tilian to lead a normal life as he grows. Now, his family needs your help to fund this $874 procedure. Tilian’s father says: “We hope for his improvement, which would reduce the concerns about the risk of infection in his wound and allow him to play freely with his friends.”

$874raised
Fully funded

Kaung is a 2-year-old baby boy who lives in Burma with his grandmother, uncle, aunt, and five-month-old cousin. His grandmother is retired, his uncle is a motorbike taxi driver and his aunt is a homemaker. Kaung was born with a condition called Congenital Hydrocephalus. Congenital Hydrocephalus is caused by a brain malformation or birth condition that causes excessive cerebrospinal fluid to accumulate in brain cavities. Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless liquid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, protecting them from injury. It carries nutrients to the brain and spinal cord and takes away waste. In a healthy person, the amount of this fluid produced by the brain is absorbed by the body. In hydrocephalus, the fluid fails to drain and accumulates, leading to pressure on the brain. Kaung's symptoms include intensifying nasal congestion and coughing with mucus. Additionally, his head is gradually increasing in size as the fluid continues to put pressure on his brain. The condition is most often treated by inserting a shunt. The shunt diverts excess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the brain to another part of the body where the fluid can be reabsorbed. Kaung's family visited a doctor when he was born to address the issue. At the time, the doctor advised the family to seek further treatment. However, Kaung was never brought to a hospital or clinic due to the financial difficulties of the family. Fortunately, Kaung was able to meet with our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). With the help of BCMF and Watsi, Kaung received a CT scan at Mae Sot General Hospital. The doctor was able to diagnose his condition and scheduled Kaung to undergo surgery immediately. Kaung is scheduled for surgery on May 26th. Kaung's aunt said, "My nephew becomes cuter by the day, and he is always smiling. I tried to save money to treat him, but I could not. But now, we are so happy to have met you all at BCMF. We are happy to know that Kaung will have the opportunity to get treated because of your support.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Sai Laung, who is 18 years old, lives with her parents and her younger sister in Shan State in Burma. Sai Laung used to be an agriculture day laborer, but she stopped working in July 2022 due to her illness. In her free time, Sai Laung likes to read Buddhist books and study English online. During the first week of July 2022, Sai Laung began to feel very tired and she developed a fever. At first, she thought it was because she was working a lot, but when she had difficulty breathing a few days later, her mother brought her to the hospital. She was told she might have a congenital heart condition, and the doctor recommended that she have an echocardiogram to confirm the diagnosis. Sai Laung had an echocardiogram at another hospital, confirming that she has a ventricular septal defect, or a hole in her heart. The doctor advised her to go to the Pun Hlaing Hospital in Yangon to see a cardiologist, which Sai Laung did towards the end of November 2022. During that visit, the doctor also diagnosed her with aortic valve regurgitation, and told her that she needs surgery. Currently, Sai Laung has difficulty breathing and is only able to walk short distances before experiencing fatigue. Performing ordinary household chores like cooking or cleaning is exhausting for her. Her lips turn blue, and she has sharp chest pain, fever, and difficulty sleeping. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, has stepped in to assist Sai Laung access the care that she needs. On March 7th, she will undergo surgery to repair her heart at Pun Hlaing Hospital. Now Sai Laung and her family need your help to raise the $1,500 to fund this life-saving procedure. “I have felt so sad since I was diagnosed with this [heart disease]. I need surgery and we have no money. I look at my parents and I pity them because they work so hard to help me get treatment. I want to recover quickly and go back to work so I can help my parents with the extra income. When I learned that there are donors who will help pay for my treatment cost, I felt so happy," said Sai Luang.

$1,500raised
Fully funded