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Stanley is a manual labourer from Kenya who needs $1,185 to fund a debridement and skin graft procedure.

Stanley
84%
  • $996 raised, $189 to go
$996
raised
$189
to go
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November 18, 2020

Stanley is a manual labourer from Kenya. A father of 3 children, all between 11 to 22 years old, his children are in school and are dependent on him for support. Depending on the availability of work, he and his wife do daily manual jobs. As a result, their income is not stable, and they also do not have medical coverage. They live in a 2-room house in their ancestral home in Ndeiya.

Last month, Stanley was working to offload and reload hay. He and some other workers had gone to deliver the grass to a client in a village a few kilometres from their town of Limuru. Stanley was trying to direct the lorry through a corner. Once the driver had finished driving through the corner, Stanley tried to jump back into the vehicle while it sped off. He missed a step and flipped, causing serious wounds on his thigh and a fracture on the left fibula head and left femoral condul. He also has an unstable knee. Following this accident, Stanley has undergone multiple debridement surgeries to treat the wound.

Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Stanley receive treatment. On November 18th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to finally help him heal and prevent infection. Now, Stanley needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure.

Stanley shared, “My bills have really gone up and I am not able to settle them. I still need this surgery recommended by the doctors so that I can heal properly and avoid infections.”

Stanley is a manual labourer from Kenya. A father of 3 children, all between 11 to 22 years old, his children are in school and are dependen...

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Stanley's Timeline

  • November 18, 2020
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Stanley was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare, our medical partner in Kenya.

  • November 19, 2020
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Stanley was scheduled to receive treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 20, 2020
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Stanley's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Stanley is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Stanley's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

Funded by 25 donors

Funded by 25 donors

Treatment
Debridement & Skin Graft
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,185 for Stanley's treatment
Hospital Fees
$1,020
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$85
Supplies
$0
Labs
$23
Other
$57
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms include burns, open wound, pain and Inability/difficulty in walking, infection, scarring and disfigurement. Debridement and skin grafting are surgical processes used to treat serious wounds and burns.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The condition involves an open wound, pain and inability or difficulty in walking. The wound affects the ability to work or perform normal daily tasks.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Damaged skin and wounds are common in Kenya due to poor living conditions. Families use open flames for cooking and warmth, leading to burns. Traumatic wounds from farming accidents, road accidents, and violence are also common. Poorly controlled diabetes, an emerging problem, also causes infection and skin breakdown.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Debridement is the removal of dead/damaged tissue skin, and skin grafting is the process of covering damaged areas with healthy skin. Skin grafting involves the transplantation of skin from one body site to another. The transplanted tissue is called a skin graft.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment heals the wound and restores normal functioning.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

The risks of treatment are limited. The skin graft may fail or may become infected.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality centers in developing countries. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Amputation, if treatment is delayed. Usually, by the time the patient has come to one of the AMHF partner hospitals, other approaches such as antibiotics and dressing changes have already been tried.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Jue

Jue is a 25-year-old woman who lives with her family in a village in Hmawbi Township, Yangon Division, Burma. Her parents are housekeepers, and her youngest brother is a first-year university student who has been seeking work. Jue used to run a beauty salon, but had to stop working four months ago when her health deteriorated. In her free time, Jue likes to watch the news and videos relating to her work at the beauty salon. She also likes to read books and wants to write a book of her own someday. In August 2020, Jue felt pains in her stomach and chest. She would also experience difficulty breathing sometimes, and she would feel tired when she walked for a longer period of time. Jue went to the clinic in her village, where she received oral medication, but she did not feel better after taking it. She returned to the clinic several times over the course of two months, but her condition continued to worsen – the chest pain, difficulty breathing and feeling of fatigue happened more often. Jue decided to go to another clinic in North Okkala Township in Yangon in November 2020. At the clinic, the doctor listened to her heart with a stethoscope, and informed her that she has a congenital heart condition. The doctor recommended she receive a blood test, an echocardiogram (echo) and an electrocardiogram (ecg) at a hospital. After visiting a hospital to receive those tests, the doctor there told her that she was born with a hole in her heart and that she might need to receive surgery at the general hospital. However, the cost of surgery was too high. Luckily, Jue crossed paths with another former patient and was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) to seek assistance with accessing treatment. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 24th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, her quality of life will significantly improve and she will be able to return to working at her beauty salon. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Jue shared, “I want to get better as quickly as possible and go back to work. I’m worried about my younger brother. He doesn’t have a job, and he needs to graduate from university. I’m also worried about Covid-19 because nobody has a job right now.”

64% funded

64%funded
$973raised
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Busingye

Busingye is a 46-year-old small scale farmer from Uganda. She has one child who is 10 years old and in primary school, class three. Both she and her husband used to harvest and sell their agricultural produce across the Uganda-Rwanda border, until the border closed and caused their business to close as well. They currently produce crops only for home consumption. For the last 18 years, Busingye has been experiencing severe abdominal pain. She was diagnosed with uterine fibroids when she was 28 years old. After getting married, Busingye gave birth prematurely by emergency C-section, and was advised to seek further care for her fibroids after recovery. Now, as a result of her condition, her stomach bulges out and prevents her from doing work. Busingye experiences dizziness and loss of appetite, and experiences severe abdominal pain. To remedy this, Busingye needs to undergo a hysterectomy, a procedure in which surgeons will remove her uterus. If not treated, she could develop endometrial cancer. Severe pains could worsen, and prevent her from carrying out her usual day to day activities completely. Over the past few years, Busingye has visited many hospitals and spent a lot of money to take care of her child, so she does not have the financial means to fund her surgery. She appeals for financial help. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $228 to fund Busingye's surgery. On December 11th, she will undergo a hysterectomy at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Busingye will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and her quality of life will improve. Busingye shared, “My family cannot currently afford the surgery and ask for your support. I will resume farming as soon as possible once given treatment.”

35% funded

35%funded
$80raised
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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Jue

Jue is a 25-year-old woman who lives with her family in a village in Hmawbi Township, Yangon Division, Burma. Her parents are housekeepers, and her youngest brother is a first-year university student who has been seeking work. Jue used to run a beauty salon, but had to stop working four months ago when her health deteriorated. In her free time, Jue likes to watch the news and videos relating to her work at the beauty salon. She also likes to read books and wants to write a book of her own someday. In August 2020, Jue felt pains in her stomach and chest. She would also experience difficulty breathing sometimes, and she would feel tired when she walked for a longer period of time. Jue went to the clinic in her village, where she received oral medication, but she did not feel better after taking it. She returned to the clinic several times over the course of two months, but her condition continued to worsen – the chest pain, difficulty breathing and feeling of fatigue happened more often. Jue decided to go to another clinic in North Okkala Township in Yangon in November 2020. At the clinic, the doctor listened to her heart with a stethoscope, and informed her that she has a congenital heart condition. The doctor recommended she receive a blood test, an echocardiogram (echo) and an electrocardiogram (ecg) at a hospital. After visiting a hospital to receive those tests, the doctor there told her that she was born with a hole in her heart and that she might need to receive surgery at the general hospital. However, the cost of surgery was too high. Luckily, Jue crossed paths with another former patient and was referred to Watsi's Medical Partner Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF) to seek assistance with accessing treatment. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 24th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, her quality of life will significantly improve and she will be able to return to working at her beauty salon. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Jue shared, “I want to get better as quickly as possible and go back to work. I’m worried about my younger brother. He doesn’t have a job, and he needs to graduate from university. I’m also worried about Covid-19 because nobody has a job right now.”

64% funded

64%funded
$973raised
$527to go