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Gaurav Sharma

MONTHLY DONOR

Gaurav's Story

Gaurav joined Watsi on February 6th, 2014. Four years ago, Gaurav joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Gaurav's most recent donation supported Samuel, a student from Kenya, to fund fracture surgery to walk again.

Impact

Gaurav has funded healthcare for 39 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Gaurav

Isaya

Isaya is a 16-year-old teenager from Tanzania. He is the firstborn child in a family of three children. Isaya never had the chance to join school due to his parent’s financial challenges. Despite not going to school, Isaya has been a very hardworking young man who helps his father look after the cattle. Isaya was born healthy and his growth has been normal, until last year when he noticed his right leg was bending inwards. He says the bend was very slight but over time it has increased significantly. Isaya has been walking over a long distance in search of green pasture for his father's cattle. However, due to his leg, Isaya can no longer go out with the cattle. Isaya was diagnosed with right genu valgus, or bowleggedness. His leg is bowed inward so that his knees touch. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he is in pain and discomfort after walking. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Isaya. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 22nd. Treatment will hopefully restore Isaya's mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications. Isaya shared, “I am unable to carry out my daily chores because of my leg. Please help me get this treatment so that I can return home and help my parents.”

63% funded

63%funded
$561raised
$319to go
U Win

U Win is a 54-year-old man who lives with his wife and youngest son in the Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. He has three sons and three daughters, with five of his children already married and working. His 17-year-old son left school because they were unable to pay school fees, and worked as a day laborer until COVID-19 happened. U Win used to work as a day laborer as well, but stopped working around two years ago due to his health condition. His family survives on 60,000 kyat (approx. 60 USD) each month that U Win's three other daughters and another son send them, enough to cover their basic expenses. In January 2012, U Win felt tired, had a headache, suffered from heart palpitations, and a rapid heartbeat. He went to a clinic where the doctor listened to his heart with a stethoscope and checked his blood pressure. U Win was told that he has high blood pressure and that he would need to take oral medication for a long time. He received an injection, oral medication, and another appointment for more medication. After he took the medication, he felt better and he went back to work. However, U Win continued to experience worsening symptoms over the next few years, returning to clinics and receiving the same treatment. He was told at one point to visit a cardiologist, but did not do so until later on. In August 2020, during another clinic visit in Yangon, the doctor diagnosed U Win with an atrial septal defect, and said that he would need to receive surgery to repair this hole in his heart. If not treated, the condition could weaken his heart further and cause lung problems later on. He was unable to receive surgery in November due to an upsurge in COVID-19 cases, and was also told the procedure would cost about 3,000,000 kyat (approx. 3,000 USD). Luckily, U Win’s wife remembered that there is a charity group in Yangon that might be able to help. The group told him about our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, to look for assistance with accessing the treatment he needed. U Win currently experiences chest pain and back pain, has no appetite, and cannot sleep well at night. He appeals for financial support for his cost of care. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 20th, U Win will undergo an atrial septal defect closure procedure. Once recovered, his quality of life will significantly improve and he will be able to return to work. Now, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. U Win shared, “I want to get better soon so that I can work for my family again. I am worried about my family’s future because we cannot find work in the village. My son also cannot go to Yangon to find another job because of COVID-19 travel restrictions.”

90% funded

90%funded
$1,361raised
$139to go
Stanley

Stanley is a manual labourer from Kenya. A father of 3 children, all between 11 to 22 years old, his children are in school and are dependent on him for support. Depending on the availability of work, he and his wife do daily manual jobs. As a result, their income is not stable, and they also do not have medical coverage. They live in a 2-room house in their ancestral home in Ndeiya. Last month, Stanley was working to offload and reload hay. He and some other workers had gone to deliver the grass to a client in a village a few kilometres from their town of Limuru. Stanley was trying to direct the lorry through a corner. Once the driver had finished driving through the corner, Stanley tried to jump back into the vehicle while it sped off. He missed a step and flipped, causing serious wounds on his thigh and a fracture on the left fibula head and left femoral condul. He also has an unstable knee. Following this accident, Stanley has undergone multiple debridement surgeries to treat the wound. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Stanley receive treatment. On November 18th, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure to finally help him heal and prevent infection. Now, Stanley needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Stanley shared, “My bills have really gone up and I am not able to settle them. I still need this surgery recommended by the doctors so that I can heal properly and avoid infections.”

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Ian

Ian, a very playful and curious boy happily entered our Watsi rep's interview room with a big smile on his face. He is a 12-year-old boy from Kenya. A few months ago while hanging out with his age mates, Ian started to understand that he had a condition that made him different than his other friends. He gathered his courage and approached his mother about the condition. She took Ian to a nearby facility for a doctor’s examination. A scan was done during the doctor’s examination and he diagnosed Ian with undescended testes. That facility was not able to do a surgery but the doctor referred them to our Medical Partner Care Center BethanyKids Hospital for treatment. Upon arrival, Ian was examined by the physician who recommended a surgery to be done as soon as possible because his testes were at risk of being damaged. The surgery will put Ian’s testes into the right place hence reducing the risk of future damage or infection. Further, the surgery would reduce instances of future infertility. Ian’s mother is a shopkeeper and his father is currently a casual laborer in a construction site near their home area. Both parents are not able to find stable jobs to provide for their family of two children. Their family cannot raise the required amount of money to fund the surgery and Ian’s mother is appealing for financial help. Ian was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Ian has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future. Ian will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on October 19. AMHF is requesting $569 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care. Ian’s mother says, “With the surgery scheduled to be done very soon because of his current situation, we are worried that his future of having a family is at risk. As a family, we are requesting for help.”

100% funded

$569raised
Fully funded
Immanuel

Immanuel is a 2-year-old child from Kenya and the last born in a family of four. His parents are both casual laborers who earn an average of $3 per day. His mother washes clothes while his father works in construction sites where they earn a daily wage. Immanuel’s parent’s income is inconsistent since they depend on the availability of work. In mid-June this year, Immanuel was playing in the kitchen as his mother prepared supper for the family. He dipped his left hand into a boiling pot of potatoes when his mother stepped out to fetch more firewood for the broth. He let out a loud scream which made his mother rush back to the kitchen only to find him burnt and in pain. Immanuel suffered burns on his chest and left arm. He is not healing well and he is prone to infection. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Immanuel receive treatment. On September 21st, surgeons will perform a debridement and skin graft procedure. This treatment will help clean his wounds and cover them with skin so as to reduce the risk of infection and improve his healing. Now, Immanuel needs help to fund this $1,185 procedure. Immanuel's mother shared, “For over two months now we have tried to source help for my baby to get this needed treatment. Unfortunately, we have been unsuccessful. The wounds are refusing to heal and his elbow has become immobile and stiff. This might affect him now and in the future, if something is not done soon.”

100% funded

$1,185raised
Fully funded
Poe

Poe is a five-year old boy who lives with his family in Shwe Koke Ko village of Karen State in Burma. In his free time, Poe likes to play with his friends and toys. He also likes to eat sweets. Poe does not go to school because of his condition. Poe's mother and father are divorced, and both are remarried. His father lives and works in Bangkok, Thailand and he contributes to Poe’s financial wellbeing by giving the household 5000 baht (approx. $167 USD) per month. His mother does not provide the family with any extra income. Poe stays with his grandmother and great grandmother from his father's side. His grandmother works as a cleaner. The rest of the family does not currently have work. When Poe was eight months old, he got a severe fever and his family took him to the Wang Pha clinic near Mae Sot, Thailand, which is the same place where he was born. He was admitted at the clinic for three days, but his condition did not improve. Doctors at the clinic told his family to take him to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further investigation. The family immediately took him to MSH and he was admitted for one week. At MSH, he received a blood test and was diagnosed with Thalassemia, a blood disorder. He received a blood transfusion and after the transfusion, Poe felt better, but only temporarily. His family went back for three follow-up appointments to MSH, where he had blood transfusions each time. When he was one year and five months old, the family could not afford going to MSH any longer, so they took Poe to Myawaddy Hospital. He received another blood transfusion and an IV line. He was admitted for three days at the hospital. Although he felt better after getting discharged in Myawaddy, since his condition is chronic, he needs regular blood transfusions to stay healthy. It became increasingly difficult for the family to pay for Poe’s care, however, they decided to come to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) for further help in 2016. Since then, he has received many blood transfusions at MTC, sometimes monthly and sometimes bi-monthly. With these treatments, he is able to survive. However, his condition also affects his spleen, the organ that filters blood. To prevent further problems, medics at MTC told his family that doctors need to remove Poe's spleen. Since it cannot be done at MTC, he needs to go back to MSH to undergo the operation. Currently, Poe has frequent bloody noses, coughs up blood, and has blood in his stool. He feels better after having a transfusion, but it wears off in the weeks following the procedure. When its nearing time for another transfusion, he feels weak and tired. When asked what he wants to do when he grows up, Poe was adamant that he wanted to be a medic. “I want to help people,” he said. “When he sees people that are sick, he always tells me he feels sorry for them,” added his great grandmother.

100% funded

$1,500raised
Fully funded