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Caleb from Kenya raised $1,260 for life-changing anorectal surgery.

Caleb
100%
  • $1,260 raised, $0 to go
$1,260
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Caleb's treatment was fully funded on March 15, 2016.

Photo of Caleb post-operation

March 2, 2017

Caleb underwent anorectal surgery.

Unfortunately, Caleb has had a long and difficult treatment journey. He successfully underwent a pull-through procedure in February 2016. He was supposed to undergo another surgery three months later, but the procedure was continuously postponed due to complications, including insufficient healing and a bout of the flu.

Fortunately, Caleb underwent surgery on January 26, 2017. However, he continues to experience abdominal pain and bowel dysfunction. He will need to undergo another procedure, which his doctor is in the process of planning.

Unfortunately, Caleb has had a long and difficult treatment journey. He successfully underwent a pull-through procedure in February 2016. He...

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February 7, 2016

Meet Caleb, a two-year-old boy who lives with his parents and elder sibling in a single roomed house in Central Kenya. Caleb’s father works odd jobs, and his mother spends her days caring for Caleb and his sister. The couple’s unsteady income has made it difficult for them to financially support their son through his medical complications.

Caleb was born without an anus, making it impossible for him to pass stool. Despite their financial straits, Caleb’s parents made sure that “right after birth he got a colostomy,” says our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). A colostomy is a procedure during which an incision is made in the abdomen and the intestine or colon is routed to that opening, allowing the patient to relieve him or herself.

However, colostomies are typically only temporary fixes for patients with Caleb’s condition. In order to achieve a more permanent means of passing stool, Caleb must undergo a procedure known as an anorectoplasty, or “pull-through” surgery. This operation will separate the urinary tract from the rectum, and create a new opening called a stoma, through which Caleb will be able to pass stool.

AMHF reports that Caleb has already developed “inflammation around his colostomy site and is at a high risk of getting infections.” Thus, he needs this next surgery as soon as possible.

Caleb’s parents have managed to raise $215 for their son’s operation, but need our help; their seven-year-old daughter recently fell and burned herself, so much of their money has gone towards her treatment. With an additional $1,260 Caleb will undergo his crucial “pull-through” operation, after which “he will be able to relieve himself normally and escape the risk of infection to which the colostomy site is prone,” explains AMHF.

“We have only been able to raise a small amount of money, but without the whole amount, Caleb can’t get treated. Please help make this treatment possible,” shares Caleb’s mother.

Meet Caleb, a two-year-old boy who lives with his parents and elder sibling in a single roomed house in Central Kenya. Caleb’s father works ...

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Caleb's Timeline

  • February 7, 2016
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Caleb was submitted by Beatrice Njoroge, Curative Medical Support Program Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • March 11, 2016
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Caleb's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 15, 2016
    FULLY FUNDED

    Caleb's treatment was fully funded.

  • January 26, 2017
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Caleb was scheduled to receive treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 2, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Caleb's treatment was started but not completed. Read the update.

Funded by 26 donors

Funded by 26 donors

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100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Chit Htun

Chit Htun is a 21-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his mother and two younger sisters and a younger brother. His father is deceased and his mother is a homemaker. She takes care of the household and her children. All of his younger siblings are students, while Chit Htun and his eldest sister are doing an online general education diploma. Chit Htun has two aunts who help the family financially as they can. He also has a former teacher who is able to contribute some money consistently to the family. This normally has been enough to cover the family’s basic necessities but since the February 2021 coup, prices have increased significantly and there is not always enough money to pay for food. Sometimes the family has free meals at the local monastery. Chit Htun was born with spina bifida as well as hydrocephalus at the Maternal and Child Hospital in Myawaddy in Burma and when he was just over a month old, he had a stent inserted in his brain to control hydrocephalus. He has multiple conditions arising from the spina bifida, including bilateral atrophy to his lower legs with club feet, a neurogenic bladder requiring a suprapubic catheter, a neurogenic bowel requiring a colostomy, along with scoliosis. Despite the number of surgeries he has undergone, and the pain he endures, he is a pleasant and engaging young man, thoughtful and independent. In Oct 2021, Chit Htun fell down from some stairs at his home. Though there was no loss of consciousness at the time, he hit his head with the fall. Since that time, he has been experiencing headaches and dizziness with occasional loss of consciousness. His mother brought him to the hospital in Yangon and a scan showed that the original shunt was in place. A second shunt was inserted, and it appeared to help with the loss of consciousness, but headaches and dizziness continued to be a problem. After the second shunt was cleared of partial blockage, Chit Htun still continued to have headaches and dizziness and then in October, he had a seizure, accompanied by nausea and vomiting. His family cannot afford to go for further investigation and treatment so that they came to Mae Tao Clinic across the border in Mae Sot, Thailand. Doctors want Chit Htun to undergo a CT scan, a procedure in which x-ray images taken from several angles are combined to produce cross-sectional images of the body. This scan will hopefully help doctors diagnose his condition and formulate an appropriate treatment plan. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $414 to cover the cost of Chit Htun's CT scan and care, scheduled for November 28th. Chit Htun said, “My condition is interrupting my education and my future. When I always have to stop my studies for treatment, it makes it difficult to continue.”

10% funded

10%funded
$45raised
$369to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.