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nelson Agudelo

nelson's Story

nelson joined Watsi on May 12th, 2013. 15 other people also joined Watsi on that day! nelson's most recent donation supported Naw Khu, baby girl from Burma, to fund a CT scan.

Impact

nelson has funded healthcare for 14 patients in 8 countries.

All patients funded by nelson

Ivan

Ivan is a two-year-old boy, and the son of subsistence farmers in Uganda. He currently lives with severe malnutrition. Ivan lives with his parents and newborn sister, who is only three weeks old. His parents grow millet, sweet potatoes, cassava and ground nuts. Ivan’s favorite food is bread, and he loves to sing along to music on the radio. Last year, Uganda went through an unusual harvest season, with a prolonged dry season followed by torrential downpour. The result was the widespread destruction of crops. Ivan’s family is one of many families who are feeling the strain of low crop yield and the associated malnutrition. Ivan has common symptoms of malnutrition, such as skin lesions, edema, and diarrhea. There is also an increased risk of stunting and cognitive impairment if he does not receive the nutrition needed. Our medical partner, The Kellermann Foundation, tells us that for $375 Ivan will receive IV fluids with therapeutic nutrition for 10 days, which is enough for Ivan to return to normal development and investigate for other causes of his symptoms. Ivan's mother will also receive nutritional education to give her the confidence she needs to provide her children with the nutrition they need on their budget and with the foods they have available. The treatment will help Ivan overcome these obstacles to development, and help him reach his full mental and physical potential. “I was worried about the hospital bills so I thank you very much," Ivan's mother shares. "May God bless you.”

100% funded

$375raised
Fully funded
Boniface

“I am very interested in joining the army in the future,” says Boniface, an 18-year-old student who enjoys playing soccer and running marathons. He lives with his parents and five younger siblings in Tanzania. When Boniface was eight years old, he touched an electrical wire during a rain storm and was electrocuted. “The palm of his right hand was badly burned,” our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF), shares. Although the skin on Boniface’s hand has healed, the scar has thickened and tightened over time, forming a contracture that limits movement of his hand and fingers. “The scar is pulling Boniface’s fingers, and there is a web between the thumb and the index finger,” explains AMHF. “Boniface is unable to fully use his right hand.” Boniface needs surgery to release the contractures on his hand. Without treatment, use of his hand will become more limited. “As Boniface continues to grow,” AMHF explains, “the scar on his palm will keep moving towards the fingers, further pulling the fingers down.” While Boniface’s mother attends school with sponsorship from her employer, the family relies on the money that Boniface’s father earns as a driver to cover their basic needs. Unfortunately, his earnings are not enough to pay for the surgery that Boniface needs. For $550, Boniface will undergo contracture release surgery on his hand. Funding also covers the costs of consultations before and after the surgery, three days of hospital care, imaging, lab work, medicine, dressing changes, and six weeks of accommodations at the Plaster House for recovery and rehabilitation. “Boniface’s fingers will be more flexible, allowing him to better use his right hand,” says AMHF.

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$550raised
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Caleb

Meet Caleb, a two-year-old boy who lives with his parents and elder sibling in a single roomed house in Central Kenya. Caleb’s father works odd jobs, and his mother spends her days caring for Caleb and his sister. The couple’s unsteady income has made it difficult for them to financially support their son through his medical complications. Caleb was born without an anus, making it impossible for him to pass stool. Despite their financial straits, Caleb’s parents made sure that “right after birth he got a colostomy,” says our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). A colostomy is a procedure during which an incision is made in the abdomen and the intestine or colon is routed to that opening, allowing the patient to relieve him or herself. However, colostomies are typically only temporary fixes for patients with Caleb’s condition. In order to achieve a more permanent means of passing stool, Caleb must undergo a procedure known as an anorectoplasty, or “pull-through” surgery. This operation will separate the urinary tract from the rectum, and create a new opening called a stoma, through which Caleb will be able to pass stool. AMHF reports that Caleb has already developed “inflammation around his colostomy site and is at a high risk of getting infections.” Thus, he needs this next surgery as soon as possible. Caleb’s parents have managed to raise $215 for their son’s operation, but need our help; their seven-year-old daughter recently fell and burned herself, so much of their money has gone towards her treatment. With an additional $1,260 Caleb will undergo his crucial “pull-through” operation, after which “he will be able to relieve himself normally and escape the risk of infection to which the colostomy site is prone,” explains AMHF. “We have only been able to raise a small amount of money, but without the whole amount, Caleb can't get treated. Please help make this treatment possible,” shares Caleb’s mother.

100% funded

$1,260raised
Fully funded