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Success! U Min from Burma raised $1,500 to fund surgery on his leg.

U Min
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
U Min's treatment was fully funded on October 20, 2020.

Photo of U Min post-operation

March 19, 2020

U Min underwent surgery on his leg.

After his surgery, U Min is no longer in pain. He can sleep well at night. The doctor told him to do exercises and practice to walk with crutches for six months. Before he was discharged, he received crutches. After six months, he will be able to walk with a prosthetic leg. He and his family is very happy that he is able to move around without suffering from pain.

U Min said, “Now, I still have to depend on my wife but after I get my prosthetic leg, I will be able to work again. Now, I am happy that I am free from pain and can move around.”

After his surgery, U Min is no longer in pain. He can sleep well at night. The doctor told him to do exercises and practice to walk with cru...

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November 26, 2019

U Min is a 49-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his wife, son, and daughter. He and his son work as day laborers. His wife stays home to look after household chores, while his daughter studies in grade school.

About a month ago, U Min’s right heel was injured while he was getting off from the tractor he was driving at work. It was very painful that he went to a clinic in his village to receive treatment. However, his condition did not improved with the treatment, and the wound worsened day by day. He was then advised by the health workers at his village to go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) for further treatment.

At MCLH, the doctor did detail assessment of U Min’s condition and said that because of his injury, the blood supply to his heel was insufficient. His wound by then has turned into black color, as the tissues around his heel were damaged and have died, and it causes him severe pain, especially at night. Since the doctor could no longer help to make his ulcer healed by treatments, the only option is to do a below knee amputation.

U Min said, “It’s so painful that I can’t bear it anymore. I just want to receive surgery as soon as possible.”

U Min is a 49-year-old man from Burma. He lives with his wife, son, and daughter. He and his son work as day laborers. His wife stays home ...

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U Min's Timeline

  • November 26, 2019
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    U Min was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund, our medical partner in Burma.

  • November 26, 2019
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    U Min received treatment at Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 29, 2019
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    U Min's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • March 19, 2020
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    U Min's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • October 20, 2020
    FULLY FUNDED

    U Min's treatment was fully funded.

Treatment
Amputation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $4,397 for U Min's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,897 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$3,558
Medical Staff
$108
Medication
$2
Supplies
$158
Travel
$16
Labs
$20
Radiology
$5
Other
$530
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Diagnosis involves broken bones, pain, and swelling.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Broken bones lead to decreased mobility. Patients are unable to do their normal daily activities.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Most people in remote areas try to fix the broken legs/arms by themselves. People go to spiritual healers or traditional massagers for healing. Sometimes the broken bone heals, but not in the correct position.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After a series of x-rays, the doctor then decides on surgery.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Healing takes time, especially for bones. When the bones have completely healed, patients will be able to get back to their normal activities without pain and/or swelling.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Risks include allergic response, infection, malignancy (very rare), osteoporosis, and migration.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Since most of our medical partner's patients come from remote areas of Burma, the treatment is not easily accessible, as it is only available in big cities like Rangoon. Patients cannot afford the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

None. If the broken bones are not fixed, patients will have to spend their lives in pain. If the swelling turns out to be malignant then it will spread faster, costing the patient’s life.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Tushabomwe

Tushabomwe is a 44 year old woman who lost her husband in 2009 when unfortunately they were attacked by gunmen in their house. Tushabomwe was shot in her thigh and she was pregnant with her third child, who luckily survived. Tushabomwe suspected the attack was planned by relatives and this forced her to move very far away to start a new life. She has not gotten married again. Tushabomwe works hard, selling dry produce such as beans in the nearby markets and was able to construct a three-room semi-permanent house for shelter. She later started small-scale farming as a way to generate food for her children. Her oldest is 15 years old and in secondary school class one, her second born in primary school class seven and her youngest is 10 years old and in primary school class four. She is proud to independently take care of her children, although it is a challenge. Tushabomwe developed a small swelling on her neck in 2019 and it kept on increasing in size as time went on. The swelling became prominent with severe pain. She went to a local health centre and was given tablets hoping that the swelling would reduce as well as the pain, but all this did not help. The swelling reduces and increases occasionally, currently, it is in its smallest size but after some time it increases in size and so does her pain. In its largest state, she has difficulty swallowing and speaking. She decided to come to Watsi's Medical Partner Care Center Rushoroza Hospital to seek medical advice and treatment. Doctors there told her that if not treated through a thyroidectomy, Tushabomwe may develop airway obstruction, thyrotoxicosis and further difficulty in swallowing. Tushabomwe says, “This condition hinders the smooth running of my business because of the pain. After surgery, I will be comfortable and I will take on my business activities and be able to take care of my family.”

61% funded

61%funded
$190raised
$117to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.