Jill AndersonMONTHLY DONOR
Jill's Story

Jill joined Watsi on January 30th, 2017. Five years ago, Jill joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Jill's most recent donation supported Velonica, a loving mother from Malawi, to fund thyroid surgery.

Impact

Jill has funded healthcare for 53 patients in 8 countries.

All patients funded by Jill

Velonica is a 43-year-old woman and a mother of three living children. She shared that she lost a set of twins just a few days after birth some 15 years ago but still holds fond memories of her lovely tiny twins. Her children are aged between 25 and 8 years old and they are all in school. The oldest daughter is at a teachers' training college and the youngest in 4th grade in primary school. Velonica lives with her children and husband in Dowa about 40 kilometers away from the city of Lilongwe in Malawi. She and her husband are subsistent farmers, although they usually don’t have enough food for the year and they seek support from her husband’s relatives that live in the same village. In 2013, Velonica developed a swelling on her neck. She visited different hospitals and finally was referred to Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) where a diagnosis of goiter was made. A partial thyroidectomy was done at the facility in 2014. However, in 2019 her neck swelling resurfaced again. She started feeling pain, having sleepless nights, difficulties in swallowing, feeling neck tightness, and headaches. She reported again to Kamuzu Central Hospital and a rescan was recommended but unfortunately, it was not done at the time. While seeking alternatives, Velonica came to Partners in Hope Medical Center. She was seen by a surgeon who, after laboratory tests and a scan, concluded that her goiter has recurred. He recommended surgery to remove the enlarged thyroid gland in a procedure called a total thyroidectomy. Velonica is currently unable to help her husband on the farm and has challenges in performing daily duties. She is unable to lift water on her head or to carry other heavy loads. Velonica feels the condition is interfering with her life and is looking forward to living her normal life again soon. Velonica said, “I live at my husband’s village among my in-laws and it has been about 2 years now of failing to do the things that every woman does, this is threatening my marriage and makes me feel bad. I hope this operation will bring an end to all this and I will be able to do my household chores again.”

69%funded
$707raised
$308to go

Klo is a 33-year-old man who lives with his wife in a village on the border of Thailand and Burma. He and is his wife are subsistence farmers, growing rice on rented land. Sometimes they work as day laborers when they can find extra work. However, due to a number of COVID cases around their area, they cannot find work right now. Late afternoon on 20 November 2021, Klo climbed a tree to pick cat tongue fruit, a type of local vegetable. Suddenly, the branch he was holding onto broke, and he fell out of the tree breaking both his wrists. Currently, both of Klo's wrists hurt badly. He cannot move his hands nor lift his arms up. He feels a bit better when he takes pain medication. He cannot dress himself and someone has to feed him and help him when he goes to the bathroom. He's worried that he cannot work on his farm since the accident. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Klo will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for November 26th and will cost $1,500. After surgery, he will be able to work on his farm again and he will no longer need someone to help him do everything such as eat and dress himself. Klo said, "I feel stressful that I cannot work during this time when I have to harvest. My wife has to work by herself and now also has to look after me. When I learned the large amount my treatment would cost, I felt hopeless. But when I learned from BCMF that donors would help me, I felt so happy and relieved! Thank you so much to all of the donors!"

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ohin Zain is a six-year-old boy who lives with his parents and his brother in a refugee camp. Ohin Zain and his brother usually study in the refugee camp but all schools have been closed since July 1st due to the outbreak of Covid-19 in the refugee camp. Ohin Zain's mother is a homemaker and his father works as a construction day labourer in the camp. Every month, Ohin Zain’s household receives 1,300 baht (approx. 43.33 USD) on a cash card from an organisation The Border Consortium. Their total monthly income is not enough for their daily expenses and sometimes, they have to borrow money with interest from their neighbour. In his free time, Ohin Zain shared that he enjoys playing with friends and drawing pictures. On the afternoon of October 24th, Ohin Zain and his friends went swimming in a stream outside of the refugee camp. While playing in the water, Ohin Zain slipped on a stone and hit his right arm against the stone. He went home and immediately his mother brought him to the clinic in the refugee camp, run by International Rescue Committee (IRC). At the clinic, a doctor examined his right arm and referred him to a nearby hospital. When they arrived at the hospital, Ohin Zain received an X-ray. The doctor explained that his lower arm is broken and that he will need to receive surgery. Currently, Ohin Zain’s right lower arm is very painful and swollen. He cannot grab nor lift anything. He cannot play nor sleep well because of the pain. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Ohin Zain will undergo surgery to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for October 27th and will cost $1,500. This procedure will help Ohin Zain be free from pain and will enable him to extend his arm and move it around. Ohin Zain said, “When I recover, I will try to study hard because I want to become a teacher. I would like to teach children.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Peter is a 42-year-old father who lives in Kenya but hails from the neighboring country Uganda. With no formal education, Peter works as a casual laborer, mostly working in people's farms to meet his daily needs. He is a father of three children, aged between 4 to 13 years old. He lives with his family here in Kenya in a rented single room in Chesoi village. Peter works hard but shared that his family struggles financially. None of his children are able to attend school, and his eldest son always accompanies him to the farm to help his father meet the needs of his younger siblings during these difficult times. On September 21st, Peter presented to the hospital late at night with complaints of abdominal pain and left inguino-scrotal swelling. Initially, the swelling was improving but has since worsened, becoming very painful. When Peter arrived at the hospital, he was walking in a stooping posture due to abdominal pain he has. An ultrasound confirmed irreducible inguinal hernia and was told that he needed to undergo an urgent herniorrhaphy. Because he had no money for the surgery, Peter considered postponing this urgent surgery, which doctors told him would be a dangerous move. Fortunately, the hospital enrolled him with Watsi and he slept at the hospital awaiting his treatment. On September 22nd, he'll undergo his much-needed surgery. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMH), is requesting $631 to fund Peter's surgery. Peter says, “My hope is to get treated. I want to be well and continue supporting my family.”

$631raised
Fully funded

John is very talkative and welcoming 46-year-old man. He arrived to the hospital with pain and distention for 3 days before admission to Kijabe Hospital this week. He had an x-ray and an endoscopy on the same day that revealed he has a Sigmoid Volvulus a condition in which the sigmoid colon wraps around itself, causing a closed-loop obstruction. This condition causes continued abdominal discomfort. He's now scheduled for a laparotomy and sigmoid colectomy to rectify the condition and needs financial support. Barely two weeks ago, John was very excited that he had found a job and was looking forward to his first day at work. Two days before he had to report to work, he noticed that he had not passed stool for some days. He started feeling uncomfortable but thought that he will be well soon enough. The day he was waiting for had arrived and he reported to work very happily but uncomfortable because his condition had worsened. He opened up to his immediate supervisor who advised him to go back home and seek medical attention. His supervisor went ahead to offer him some money to cater for the transport fee. John went to the terminus and boarded a matatu to head back home. Along the way, the pain worsened and was unbearable and he started vomiting. He requested the driver to drop him off at a nearby hospital. Luckily, the matatu was almost near our medical partner's care center Kijabe Hospital. The driver pulled over and helped him catch a taxi to Kijabe as fast as he could. He was admitted as an emergency case under the general surgery team. John is the father of six children, with his firstborn now 20 years old and married. Four of his children are in high school and the youngest is yet to join the school. Eight months ago, John lost his job as a security guard in a flower farm. After he was dismissed, he used the money he was given as service fees to buy a motorcycle, with which he started a bodaboda taxi business. His wife is involved in farming and mostly she sells the farm produce to supplement their family's earnings. John shared, “I feel sad for myself and my family because now I cannot do anything to provide for them as I am in hospital. I would really like to go back to work and earn enough for them.”

$616raised
Fully funded

Than is a 42-year-old woman from Thailand. She lives with her husband, three daughters, three sons, son-in-law and granddaughter. Than and her family moved from Burma to Thailand ten years ago in search of better job opportunities. Her husband, her oldest daughter, one son, and her son-in-law work as day labourers on their employer’s farm, growing and harvesting tapioca, corn, and cabbage. Her two other sons go to school, while her youngest daughter and her granddaughter are too young to go to school. Than and her second oldest daughter are homemakers. On November 7th, 2020, Than discovered that she had an incisional hernia. Currently, Than experiences abdominal pain throughout the week and has to take pain medication to decrease her pain. She feels uncomfortable when she sits, and when she is in pain, she has to walk or lie down for the pain to ease. Fortunately, on January 28th, she will undergo hernia repair surgery at Mae Sot General Hospital, our medical partner's care center. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Than's hernia repair surgery. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 28th and, once completed, will hopefully allow her to live more comfortably and go about her daily activities normally. Than shared, “I was so happy when I learned that I was to go to Mae Tao Clinic [and later Mae Sot Hospital] for treatment. My children are also happy that I will receive treatment with help from donors.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded