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Success! Paw from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund heart surgery.

Paw
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Paw's treatment was fully funded on February 1, 2018.

Photo of Paw post-operation

January 16, 2018

Paw underwent heart surgery.

She feels much better after surgery. She can walk and talk without growing tired, and her heart palpitations have stopped.

She says, “I’m very happy to receive this treatment. I would like to wholeheartedly thank all of the donors and people associated with BCMF who have helped me through the medical treatment processes.”

She feels much better after surgery. She can walk and talk without growing tired, and her heart palpitations have stopped. She says, "I’...

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December 7, 2017

44-year-old Paw is originally from Burma, but has been living in a refugee camp in Thailand for the past 20 years. She lives there with her husband and their two young daughters. While Paw’s husband sometimes finds miscellaneous work as a day laborer outside the camp, neither of them has a steady job. They primarily rely on the aid given out in the refugee camp.

At the beginning of this year, Paw began experiencing heart palpitations on a regular basis. These palpitations frighten her and leave her extremely fatigued. Sometimes, she is so exhausted from the palpitations that she can only walk short distances at a time.

The refugee camp’s health center referred Paw to Mae Sot Hospital, where she was diagnosed with atrial septal defect. This means that there is a hole in the wall that divides the upper chambers of her heart. As a result, oxygen-poor blood mixes with oxygen-rich blood, and her brain, organs, and other body parts receive an inadequate oxygen supply.

Paw needs surgery to close this hole in her heart. However, without a reliable income, she and her husband cannot pay for the procedure. But we can help. By raising $1,500, we can pay for Paw’s operation on December 10, as well as her lab tests, four-day hospital stay, and travel to Chiang Mai for doctors’ visits.

Paw’s family was very distressed when she received her diagnosis. But by securing her surgery, we can help them take steps towards their hope of someday moving out of the camp. “I want my children to have a better future in the U.S.,” shares Paw.

44-year-old Paw is originally from Burma, but has been living in a refugee camp in Thailand for the past 20 years. She lives there with her ...

Read more

Paw's Timeline

  • December 7, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Paw was submitted by Ma Tu, Senior Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • December 12, 2017
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Paw received treatment at Lampang Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 18, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Paw's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 16, 2018
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Paw's treatment was successful. Read the update.

  • February 1, 2018
    FULLY FUNDED

    Paw's treatment was fully funded.

Funded by 20 donors

Funded by 20 donors

Treatment
ASD Closure
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $7,825 for Paw's treatment
Subsidies fund $6,325 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,009
Medical Staff
$721
Medication
$39
Supplies
$4,994
Travel
$580
Labs
$84
Radiology
$312
Other
$86
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience excessive sweating, extreme tiredness and fatigue, irregular heartbeat, rapid breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis (a blue tinge to the skin), clubbed fingernails, lightheadedness, or loss of consciousness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients cannot do labor work—even doing household chores may tire them. Adults will be unable to care for their families, and children will be unable to play or attend school. As the condition progresses, patients may become unable to eat.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Burma has a long queue of congenital cardiac patients who need surgery. With only four fully trained cardiac surgeons in Burma, children with congenital heart defects may have extreme difficulty accessing treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Doctors may combine catheter and surgical procedures to repair complex congenital heart defects. If the defect cannot be fixed with a catheter, the patient will undergo an open heart surgery to close holes in the heart.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This surgery saves lives. Children will return to school, and adults will return to working and caring for their families.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, fever, swelling, inflammation, arrhythmias, damage to surrounding organs, stroke, and death. Heart surgery is more likely to be life-threatening for patients who are very sick before the surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Many of our medical partner's patients live in remote areas. They cannot afford or access treatment because it is only available in large cities.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, this heart condition will become life-threatening for patients.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mercy

Mercy is a 28-year-old subsistence farmer from Malawi. She lives in a grass-thatched house with her husband and their three children. Her oldest child is nine years old and attends school, while her youngest is five years old. She and her husband also take care of her 93-year-old grandmother who depends on them. Mercy and her husband farm together and their farm produces enough food to feed the family, but not enough to sell a surplus. To supplement their income, she and her husband also work on other people's farms. In 2018, Mercy noticed a small lump on the left side of her neck. Over the years, the lump has grown and is hard and painful. After having several appointments rescheduled, Mercy finally got a scan and was referred to a lab for thyroid tests and to a surgeon. The lab tests and transportation costs have greatly impacted her family’s income, and it has taken her three years to have all of the required testing. She was finally diagnosed with an enlarged thyroid and surgery was recommended to heal her condition. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH) is helping Mercy to receive treatment. On September 2nd, she will undergo a thyroidectomy at AMH's care center. Now, she needs help raising $1,015 to fund her procedure and care. Mercy shared, "this condition is not only affecting me, but mainly my helpless 93 years old grandmother and also my family. I can no longer draw water for my grandmother and my children are too young to help. My husband is now getting exhausted combining farm work and household chores. Please assist me with this surgery so I can start helping my family again."

75% funded

75%funded
$763raised
$252to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.