Meet another patient

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Yo Sue from Burma raised $1,500 to fund eye surgery.

Yo Sue
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Yo Sue's treatment was fully funded on November 8, 2017.
June 20, 2017

Yo Sue did not undergo eye surgery.

While doctors had planned to operate on Yo Sue on February 27, they had to postpone Yo Sue’s surgery upon his arrival due to a large influx of emergency patients who needed surgery first. Yo Sue’s surgery is scheduled for August, however due to the length of the surgery schedule, Yo Sue’s will be re-submitted for Watsi funding when the time for his surgery draws nearer.

While doctors had planned to operate on Yo Sue on February 27, they had to postpone Yo Sue's surgery upon his arrival due to a large influx ...

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February 23, 2017

Yo Sue is a 24-year-old man who lives in a village in Burma. He lives with his mother, older brother, and cousin. The family farms and sells pigs and chickens. Yo Sue used to work as a security guard in Bangkok. However, he left his position when he started to experience vision problems.

Yo Sue lost vision in his right eye when he was 14 years old. A cataract was diagnosed and surgically treated. The cataract replacement procedure was not successful, and he never recovered vision in his right eye.

Recently, he began to experience vision problems with the left eye, causing him great concern. One day, Yo Sue was riding his motorbike and the bright sunlight made it difficult for him to see. When he arrived home and took off his helmet, his vision was blurred.

Yo Sue visited his local clinic and was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for further evaluation. His symptoms were blurred vision and lack of visual acuity. He was diagnosed with retinal detachment. The retina of his eye has separated from the layer underneath, allowing fluid to leak out of the eye behind the retina.

Yo Sue’s doctors recommended he have a vitrectomy to salvage his vision. Surgeons will clear the inner jelly, remove scar tissue, inject dense liquids to smooth the retina, and inject a gas or silicone oil to secure the retina in place as it heals. The procedure, supplies, medication, and three days of inpatient care costs $1,500. His procedure has been scheduled for February 27.

Yo Sue will use eye drops for several weeks following surgery to help the recovery. Barring any complications in the procedure, he will have his vision restored.

“I hope to restore my vision so that I can help my mother, brother, and cousin with the needs of the family,” shares Yo Sue.

Yo Sue is a 24-year-old man who lives in a village in Burma. He lives with his mother, older brother, and cousin. The family farms and sells...

Read more

Yo Sue's Timeline

  • February 23, 2017
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Yo Sue was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • February 27, 2017
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Yo Sue was scheduled to receive treatment at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • March 1, 2017
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Yo Sue's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 20, 2017
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Yo Sue's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

  • June 20, 2017
    FUNDING ENDED

    Yo Sue is no longer raising funds.

Funded by 27 donors

Funded by 27 donors

Treatment
Vitrectomy (Retinal Detachment)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $3,463 for Yo Sue's treatment
Subsidies fund $1,963 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$559
Medical Staff
$1,704
Medication
$152
Supplies
$599
Travel
$341
Labs
$63
Other
$45
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience blurred or dim vision, shadows or blind spots in the field of vision, sensitivity to light and glare, and double vision.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Reduced vision can result in social isolation, depression, increased risk of falling and accidents, and ultimately a greater tendency to be disabled. Without surgery, the patient will have no choice but to live with end-stage ocular disease, often resulting in blindness or pain.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The healthcare system in Burma does not permit the average citizen to receive proper eye examinations. This lack of attention to ocular health is due to a variety of reasons. However, a low optometrist-to-population ratio and insufficient funds are the leading causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery will only be performed if the pressure in the eye is stable. The time it takes to stabilize the pressure in the eye depends on the severity of damage to the eye.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The patient will regain his or her vision, though it may not be perfectly clear. Fortunately, the surgery prevents a complete loss of vision.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, scarring, persistent swelling, wound separation, and the need to undergo additional surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Burma has 309 ophthalmologists and 150 eye nurses. Fewer than half of the ophthalmologists perform surgery, and almost two-thirds confine their practice to the cities of Yangon (with a population of about six million) and Mandalay (about three million), where many people have the financial capacity to meet high out-of-pocket healthcare expenses. Aside from these main facilities, there is roughly one ophthalmologist for every 500,000 people, and eye health screening and treatment for children and adults is neither comprehensive nor consistent.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, the patient will eventually lose his or her vision completely.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Pai

Pai is a 63-year-old woman who lives alone in a refugee camp in the border region of Thailand and Burma. She receives 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) each month on a cash card from The Border Consortium, to purchase food in the refugee camp. This support is just enough to cover her daily needs, since she sometimes shares meals with her sister. In June 2019, Pai first notice that the vision in both of her eyes was blurry. By late 2021, she could no longer see with her left eye. She then went to the hospital in the refugee camp, run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC). A medic checked her eyes, gave her some eyedrops, and told her that they would refer her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further follow up. IRC staff brought Pai to the hospital in January where the doctor completed a vision test and also checked her eyes with specialized equipment. The doctor diagnosed her with cataracts and shared that she would need surgery to be able to see clearly again. Currently, Pai can only see objects near to her with her right eye and even then, she cannot see objects clearly. She can only perceive light with her left eye. When she walks, she has to do so slowly to avoid stubbing her toes on stones and other objects. At night, she now needs someone to assist her to get around at all. She also has difficulty cleaning her house and doing other household chores like washing her clothes or cooking. She shared that when she tries to cook on her own, she will sometimes mixed up the ingredients now. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Pai. On February 22nd, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Pai's natural lens and replace this with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Pai said, “I do not want to depend on my sister as she has to look after her family too. However, now I have to depend on her for many things and I feel sad about this.” Pai is thankful to the donors who can help pay for her treatment cost. She is very happy that there will be a donor for her. She said, “I hope that I can see again, and I really want to see the donors and everyone at BCMF’s organisation who was willing to help me. Thank you so much for your kind support.”

79% funded

79%funded
$1,187raised
$313to go
Dismas

Dismas is a boda boda taxi driver from Kenya. He is a bright and hardworking young man from a highland region in Elgeyo Marakwet County. Dismas is the third born in a family of four. He studied up to the 7th grade in primary school, but then had to stop attending due to the school fees. Now he lives in a rental house with his wife and their son. His parents live in a place far from him in a semi-arid area, and he moved to look for work and to earn a living. Before his recent accident, Dismas was employed as a motorcycle driver and his limited wages enabled him to sustain his family and give his parents a little support. After a severe road traffic accident about three weeks ago, Dismas was taken to the hospital on a stretcher and is still unable to walk. The bill for his care has been accumulating and he had no funds to pay due to his current state and inability to work. Well-wishers helped him pay the bill and he was discharged home with his fracture stabilized on a splint. One of his brothers reached out to a friend who knew of our medical partner's care center, Kapsowar Hospital, and he was brought in to see if they could help him. An x-ray found that he sustained fractures of the distal tibia and fibula. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On April 26th, Dismas will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After he heals from this surgery, he will be able to walk easily again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $1145 to fund this procedure. Dismas says, "It really hurts when I see my family suffering. I am worried about their future if my condition doesn’t change. Kindly help me get well so that they may not be impacted even more.”

51% funded

51%funded
$593raised
$552to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Pai

Pai is a 63-year-old woman who lives alone in a refugee camp in the border region of Thailand and Burma. She receives 350 baht (approx. $12 USD) each month on a cash card from The Border Consortium, to purchase food in the refugee camp. This support is just enough to cover her daily needs, since she sometimes shares meals with her sister. In June 2019, Pai first notice that the vision in both of her eyes was blurry. By late 2021, she could no longer see with her left eye. She then went to the hospital in the refugee camp, run by the International Rescue Committee (IRC). A medic checked her eyes, gave her some eyedrops, and told her that they would refer her to Mae Sot Hospital (MSH) for further follow up. IRC staff brought Pai to the hospital in January where the doctor completed a vision test and also checked her eyes with specialized equipment. The doctor diagnosed her with cataracts and shared that she would need surgery to be able to see clearly again. Currently, Pai can only see objects near to her with her right eye and even then, she cannot see objects clearly. She can only perceive light with her left eye. When she walks, she has to do so slowly to avoid stubbing her toes on stones and other objects. At night, she now needs someone to assist her to get around at all. She also has difficulty cleaning her house and doing other household chores like washing her clothes or cooking. She shared that when she tries to cook on her own, she will sometimes mixed up the ingredients now. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund lens replacement surgery for Pai. On February 22nd, doctors will perform a lens replacement, during which they will remove Pai's natural lens and replace this with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly. Now, she needs help to fund this $1,500 procedure. Pai said, “I do not want to depend on my sister as she has to look after her family too. However, now I have to depend on her for many things and I feel sad about this.” Pai is thankful to the donors who can help pay for her treatment cost. She is very happy that there will be a donor for her. She said, “I hope that I can see again, and I really want to see the donors and everyone at BCMF’s organisation who was willing to help me. Thank you so much for your kind support.”

79% funded

79%funded
$1,187raised
$313to go