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Success! Israel from Colombia raised $799 to fund a polydactyly procedure so he can learn to walk.

Israel
100%
  • $799 raised, $0 to go
$799
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Israel's treatment was fully funded on July 12, 2021.

Photo of Israel post-operation

October 11, 2021

Israel underwent a polydactyly procedure and is now learning to walk.

Israel’s surgery was postponed a couple times to ensure he was healthy enough for surgery, but he’s now underwent his treatment and is doing really well! His family is relieved that Israel will be able to wear shoes and walk normally as he grows now.

His mother said: “I’m really thankful for all you did for my son. I know we had to reschedule the procedure many times but God’s timing is perfect.”

Israel's surgery was postponed a couple times to ensure he was healthy enough for surgery, but he's now underwent his treatment and is doing...

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June 17, 2021

Israel is a one-year-old baby from Colombia who loves animals. His mother came to Colombia from Venezuela to seek better opportunities, where she fell in love with a Colombian man who became Israel’s father. Israel loves to play with cars and his dog. Even though he doesn’t speak a lot yet, he is constantly looking for a phone to call his grandmother.

Israel was born with polydactyly of both feet. This means that he has an extra toe on each foot, which prevents him from wearing shoes and walking normally.

On August 17th, surgeons from our medical partner will perform a polydactyly repair procedure to remove the extra digits. Our medical partner, ClĂ­nica Noel, is requesting $799 to fund this procedure. After surgery, Israel will be able to start wearing shoes and learn to walk and run.

His mother offered advice for other mothers in a similar situation to stay hopeful: “The only thing that worried me was to know if he was going to be able to walk normally and wear shoes. I would tell a mother whose son was just diagnosed with polydactyly to just calm down and let the doctors help her, fortunately, this is not a complex pathology and the treatment already exists.”

Israel is a one-year-old baby from Colombia who loves animals. His mother came to Colombia from Venezuela to seek better opportunities, wher...

Read more

Israel's Timeline

  • June 17, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Israel was submitted by SofĂ­a Gaviria Miranda, Head of Donations at ClĂ­nica Noel.

  • June 21, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Israel's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • July 12, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Israel's treatment was fully funded.

  • September 28, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Israel received treatment at ClĂ­nica Noel in Colombia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • October 11, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Israel's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
Bilateral Polydactily
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $799 for Israel's treatment
Hospital Fees
$454
Medical Staff
$300
Medication
$45
Supplies
$0
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The patient is born with extra fingers or toes on one or both of their hands and/or feet. The extra finger might or might not contain bones, joints, and functioning tissues.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Since there are extra fingers or toes, the extremity might not be completely functional. Esthetic differences might lead to psychological problems caused by social acceptance or bullying at school.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In the country, it’s hard to have access to good health insurance coverage, is rare that patients are driven to a specialized institution, and even when they are, families often don’t have enough money to pay for the treatment or to travel to the city where they are going to get surgery.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

When patients are driven to an orthopedist, the doctor orders x-rays to decide the best treatment approach when in surgery. During surgery the doctor removes the extra fingers or toes, trying to save as much tissue as possible to keep functional extremities.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

When the malformations are treated, the patient gains the greater ability to have functional extremities. The risk of psychological impact decreases because of the functional and esthetic improvement.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

There’s a chance this treatment leaves residual malformations, scars, or relapses of the treatment. As in any surgery, there is a risk of bleeding and infection.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

In the country, it’s hard to have access to good health insurance coverage, is rare that patients are driven to a specialized institution, and even when they are, families often don’t have enough money to pay for the treatment.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Leaving the extra fingers or toes as they are.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Nchambi

Nchambi is a bright and creative 8-year-old student. She is the fifth born in a family of seven children from her mother. She is currently in class six, but she unfortunately had to stop her studies to seek treatment for her condition. Some of her favorite subjects in school are arts and crafts, social studies, and mathematics. Nchambi was diagnosed with left genu varus, meaning her left leg is bent at the knee, making it difficult to walk. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, she struggles with walking to school and carrying out her daily life activities, such as helping her mother with small home chores like cleaning cloths, washing plates, and sweeping. They shared that fetching water is now something she cannot do at all due to her leg condition. Recently, every morning before school, Nchambi has had to wake up extra early to prepare because it takes her a long time to make the one-kilometer walk to her school. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Nchambi. The procedure is scheduled to take place on July 5th. Treatment will hopefully restore Nchambi's mobility, allowing her to participate in a variety of activities and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Nchambi shares, “I can’t catch up with my friends when walking to school because I am slow. I can’t walk as fast as them because of my leg.”

34% funded

34%funded
$300raised
$580to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Nchambi

Nchambi is a bright and creative 8-year-old student. She is the fifth born in a family of seven children from her mother. She is currently in class six, but she unfortunately had to stop her studies to seek treatment for her condition. Some of her favorite subjects in school are arts and crafts, social studies, and mathematics. Nchambi was diagnosed with left genu varus, meaning her left leg is bent at the knee, making it difficult to walk. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, she struggles with walking to school and carrying out her daily life activities, such as helping her mother with small home chores like cleaning cloths, washing plates, and sweeping. They shared that fetching water is now something she cannot do at all due to her leg condition. Recently, every morning before school, Nchambi has had to wake up extra early to prepare because it takes her a long time to make the one-kilometer walk to her school. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Nchambi. The procedure is scheduled to take place on July 5th. Treatment will hopefully restore Nchambi's mobility, allowing her to participate in a variety of activities and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Nchambi shares, “I can’t catch up with my friends when walking to school because I am slow. I can’t walk as fast as them because of my leg.”

34% funded

34%funded
$300raised
$580to go